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3 years ago  ::  Dec 30, 2010 - 10:24PM #1
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937

I recently read an interesting short article about RSVPing and how its mostly a thing of the past, and how a lot of people probably do not know what it stand for (largely the younger generation). I believe that RSVPing (replying to an invitation, no matter what for) is important. If one receives an invitation 'you are happily invited to Jonny's first birthday party' and that is all the invitation says, one still reply. Invitees should not assume that the host KNOWS that they are coming. Its especially important to reply to invitations where there is a sit down meal involved. With this, the host has to account for seating and food (a lot more so then if potluck  and a little bit more then if buffee). If there are too few seats (as in zero extra seats, and very little if any extra food for extra people) then 'surprise' extras will be kinda left out. The worst (on the side of invited people) is when they feel the host was rude for not accounting for them and assuming they were coming. But how could the host? Too many non responces and the host has to consider how much they can afford to spend on food and seating/ space that MIGHT get wasted? If they cannot spend a whole lot then people who do not respond would obviously be left out. When all people respond with a yes or no, then one can plan accordingly with their budget. The less that respond, the more that could be spent per person. The worst time for non response to an invitation where the invitee is planning on attending is a wedding. A wedding is a significant event, and if the couple has inviteed a lot of people (say 200-250 people) a non response of say 50-75 is significant. If a lot of that group is planning on coming, there could be a significant shortage of food, and definitely not (since most weddings are sit down) enough seating. What is worse is when the invied person (who did not respond to invitation but showed up to wedding reception) feels the couple getting married was rude for not accounting for them. People planning a wedding would spend their money differently (for the wedding) if 125 guests responded saying they would be coming as opposed to 200 or 225. The place might be smaller but could be slightly nicer, and the food could be slightly nicer too, or there could be an open bar, with say a champane toast or wine free/ open bar (to wine). I think it could be a good idea to include on an ivitation 'please reply by x date.' Hopefully this would give invited persons the clue that the host wants to know who is and is not coming.


JFG

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3 years ago  ::  Jan 07, 2011 - 7:53AM #2
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937

One major problem (maybe I said this) of not responding to an invitation, has to do with where the person immediately knows they are coming to the event. Hosts cannot play for every 'maybe' or unresponded to invitation, particularly with more formal parties and such. Assuming that the host WILL know you are coming means they should know who is and is not coming and (likely) why. That is not possible if the initial guest list is long, and the number of no respondes is also long (say initial guest list of 200 with 50-75 no responses). How can one know that about everyone they invite who does not respond?


JFG

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