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Switch to Forum Live View Mom's make better employees?
4 years ago  ::  Sep 10, 2010 - 5:38AM #1
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937

Recently there was an article published in the daily mail  where the author of it (Carol Sarler) believes that the days of bosses and collegues shunning working mothers are over, and now working mothers make better employees then non working mothers. The article I read was in response to that article. Here is a link to it: www.lemondrop.com/2010/08/31/i-don-t-wan...


To me, I don't think being a mom or not would not change weather or not an employee was good or dedicated or whatever or not. It was argued by the daily mail article that non- moms are the ones who turn up to work late and hung over. The response article writer was upset by this saying that she hardly ever goes to bard anymore, or even drinks. On top of that, I am a Christian who does not believe in drunkness. I hardly ever drink, and this has been true my entire life. Aside from that, I am 30, but currently have no children because I am single, and cannot afford to have/ raise any. Other people chose not to have kids because of health conditions they have (that would either make their health condition worse/ progress faster, or because they have a good chance of passing the disease on to their child). The trouble with the daily mail author is that she is forgetting that a lot of mothers miss work for children's illnesses, school plays, school trips (maybe) and such. Mothers, particularly in the united states, also do not have great maternity leave (for the most part) so are returning to work before the child is even a year old, so are still getting up during the night to feed their child. Its wrong to argue that 'she does not have kids and therefore will go out and party a lot more then a mom, and therefore it WILL effect her job/ work" or " She is a mom so she stays home and ALWAYS has a good nights rest."  While mom's are less likely to go out and party, this does not guarentee that they have always gotten a good nights rest and such. I also think that being a mom or not being a mom won't have any effect on your job dedication (ok, minus the people who are in their job, mom or not, because thay cannot find anything else at the moment and REALLY need the money, for survival). Sure it can be argued that mom's are more likely to use up all of their sick time, but often not for their own illness, but it also can be argued that a non mom might be more likely to use up all their vacation time because they have no kids and take (and possibly afford to take) more vacations. I believe that for women, of they like their job enough, and are going to be sticking around for a while, they will be properly dedicated and do a good job whether or not they are a mom.

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 10, 2010 - 10:35AM #2
Tolerant Sis
Posts: 4,201

Being a mother definitely makes one pretty organized, by default, so perhaps working mothers are typically better employees, but speaking as a working mother with a small nursery in my office and a young high school daughter, I can very definitely say that I get called away a LOT more than my employees without children.  Kids get sick, somebody needs a ride to a game or a play, and Mom tends to be the Bus of First Resort, four kids are leaving college on the same day and it will require four two-car trips to get all their stuff home.  


I had an employee for about three months who had five young children.  While she was great as a freelancer, when she came on board full time, she was not able to make the transition, and always needed extra time off practically every week.  By the end of the third month, she came to me and asked if she could go back to being a freelancer, which I was delighted to hear, because I didn't want to fire her (especially since I am often in similar straits) and knew what she was going through, but at the same time she couldn't meet the workload.


My single employees, with one exception, have been dedicated and pretty single-minded.  They have their eyes on a higher prize.


 

First amendment fan since 1793.
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4 years ago  ::  Sep 15, 2010 - 6:28AM #3
jesusfreakgal
Posts: 937

Higher prize being to advance their career? I 100% do not believe that mothers make bad employees. In fact, I know a woman with children whose husband is a stay at home dad. She wouldnèt have the ètieè to her kids in that she wouldn't need sick time to look after sick kids or whatever. Its hard, because on the one hand there may be skills mom's have that single women do not have, but I feel that more non- mom's have more time to give overtime. Even if a mom had their child in daycare, it's likely that they have a time they need to pick their child up by. Its not as though mom (or dad) can work until 8pm 3 days a week and then be able to pick up their child from daycare. Also, the more / later mom/ dad work, the worse it could be for their children. It kind of reminds me of the beginning of hook (was the dad not the mom here), where Peter promised jack that he would be at his big baseball game, but then, because of work he wasn't. It made Jack very upset, even to the point of drawing a picture where Peter was the only one with out a parachute (plane was on fire). I don't believe employers should chose their employees based on anything other then their skills, and not whether or not they have children.


JFG

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 20, 2010 - 4:53PM #4
Tolerant Sis
Posts: 4,201

They don't want to be in a regional weekly forever.  They want to earn their awards, get their portfolios together, and hit the big time.  Mothers - and I include myself, although as the person who runs this shindig, my motivations are mixed - want a job they can do and go home and take care of the kids.  


If that's the job on offer, a working mother is great.  They're organized, they can multi-task, they are flexible to a degree, and so forth.  But if you want a media star, a working mom with multiple children may not be able to do it.  


Because I am fairly well known in my state, I can get away with the baby in a backpack during an interview, or my secretary might watch my two year old while I'm interviewing the governor, or what have you.  Most working mothers don't have that luxury.  But neither do I want a job as city editor of the Washington Post or the New York Times.  I'm quite happy where I am at this point in my life.

First amendment fan since 1793.
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