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Switch to Forum Live View What's a Degree REALLY Worth???
5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 9:37AM #71
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Feb 8, 2010 -- 4:01PM, Girlchristian wrote:


Feb 7, 2010 -- 11:38AM, rangerken wrote:


My wife's Bachelors and Masters were necessary for her to be a regular army officer and to advance to lieutenant colonel...and they helped her get her current, civilian job. My son's Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) is what got him into the army job he now has, and will enable him to continue in it as a civilian when his enlistment ends next May. My degrees definitely had real 'worth'. I had to have a Bachelor's Degree to keep my commission in the army. Then I had to get a Masters to get promoted beyond major. And then I needed my PhD to teach college courses. On the other hand, my late father ran a 1000 store retail company very well with one year of college! And a close friend has five very successful auto body repair shops and he didn't go to college. Another friend and neighbor is a master plumber, and a fine one... no college there either. The value of any sort of degree depends entirely on what you need it for and what you do with it. Some are indeed 'worthless'... and some are woth pure gold. Some careers need them (medical doctors and dentists, lawyers, accountants, engineers), and some careers only use them as 'dues paying' things while the degree itself means nothing in terms of helping with the job. Non subject specific education degrees come to mind here. the college level courses i had to take to get my Massachusetts teaching certificate in chemistry were totally WORTHLESS!!!!...totally 'dues paying' crap. I was not considered 'qualified' to teach high school chemistry or physics even though I WAS teaching college level chemistry with a PhD at the time! But I wanted to teach high school students so I wasted my time and money and took the ridiculous, meaningless, unnecessary, and worthless ed courses... I have no strong feelings about this of course . I've long been a loud proponent of doing away with this in Massachusetts...with zero success of course... teachers union loves such things so politicians are their usual cowardly selves. I think the union was happy when I retired last June.... no such idiocy re: my college teaching of course.


Don't you just love my subtlety????


Anyway, the whole degree thing depends on the career field... some justifiably need degrees, and many, if not most, do not.


Ken



\


At the age of 32, I'm back in school and I think it's absolutely ridiculous that I am required to take so many courses that have nothing to do with my major. Courses which add to the time I'll be in school. I'm in school under COVB (Child of a Veteran Benefits) so I don't have the additional student loans from courses that won't help me later, but I know many students that do.




Hey, don't feel bad. I'm thinking that at age 42 and after a career that lasted nearly two decades, I'm going to have to go back in order to stay relevant and employable in today's market. As far as courses that have "nothing to do with the major" -- sometimes, those are the best thing about going to college. They are the ones that really expand your mind and broaden your perspective -- which to me, is what getting an education is really all about.


For example, the logic course I took way back in the dinosaur days (LOL) remians one of my favorites and the most relevant, in terms of overall life skills. And it had nothing to do with either my major or my two minors.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 9:41AM #72
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,552

Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:37AM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Feb 8, 2010 -- 4:01PM, Girlchristian wrote:


Feb 7, 2010 -- 11:38AM, rangerken wrote:


My wife's Bachelors and Masters were necessary for her to be a regular army officer and to advance to lieutenant colonel...and they helped her get her current, civilian job. My son's Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) is what got him into the army job he now has, and will enable him to continue in it as a civilian when his enlistment ends next May. My degrees definitely had real 'worth'. I had to have a Bachelor's Degree to keep my commission in the army. Then I had to get a Masters to get promoted beyond major. And then I needed my PhD to teach college courses. On the other hand, my late father ran a 1000 store retail company very well with one year of college! And a close friend has five very successful auto body repair shops and he didn't go to college. Another friend and neighbor is a master plumber, and a fine one... no college there either. The value of any sort of degree depends entirely on what you need it for and what you do with it. Some are indeed 'worthless'... and some are woth pure gold. Some careers need them (medical doctors and dentists, lawyers, accountants, engineers), and some careers only use them as 'dues paying' things while the degree itself means nothing in terms of helping with the job. Non subject specific education degrees come to mind here. the college level courses i had to take to get my Massachusetts teaching certificate in chemistry were totally WORTHLESS!!!!...totally 'dues paying' crap. I was not considered 'qualified' to teach high school chemistry or physics even though I WAS teaching college level chemistry with a PhD at the time! But I wanted to teach high school students so I wasted my time and money and took the ridiculous, meaningless, unnecessary, and worthless ed courses... I have no strong feelings about this of course . I've long been a loud proponent of doing away with this in Massachusetts...with zero success of course... teachers union loves such things so politicians are their usual cowardly selves. I think the union was happy when I retired last June.... no such idiocy re: my college teaching of course.


Don't you just love my subtlety????


Anyway, the whole degree thing depends on the career field... some justifiably need degrees, and many, if not most, do not.


Ken



\


At the age of 32, I'm back in school and I think it's absolutely ridiculous that I am required to take so many courses that have nothing to do with my major. Courses which add to the time I'll be in school. I'm in school under COVB (Child of a Veteran Benefits) so I don't have the additional student loans from courses that won't help me later, but I know many students that do.




Hey, don't feel bad. I'm thinking that at age 42 and after a career that lasted nearly two decades, I'm going to have to go back in order to stay relevant and employable in today's market. As far as courses that have "nothing to do with the major" -- sometimes, those are the best thing about going to college. They are the ones that really expand your mind and broaden your perspective -- which to me, is what getting an education is really all about.


For example, the logic course I took way back in the dinosaur days (LOL) remians one of my favorites and the most usefull, in terms of overall life skills. And it had nothing to do with either my major or my two minors.




I agree to a point.  For those of us like me who are back in school full-time and working full-time, the classes that have nothing to do with my major just cause a headache.  I'm not reading anything for enlightenment or to broaden my perspective due to a lack of time. I'm reading to pass a test or write a paper.  If I didn't have to take the extra courses, I could focus on those that are in my major and actually gain something from the classes.  I think schools need to be more flexible for those working adults that are back in school and recognize that they're not in school for the same reasons as 18-24 year olds are and they don't have the same time available.

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible.” Stuart Chase
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 12:08PM #73
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:41AM, Girlchristian wrote:


Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:37AM, mytmouse57 wrote:


Feb 8, 2010 -- 4:01PM, Girlchristian wrote:


Feb 7, 2010 -- 11:38AM, rangerken wrote:


My wife's Bachelors and Masters were necessary for her to be a regular army officer and to advance to lieutenant colonel...and they helped her get her current, civilian job. My son's Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) is what got him into the army job he now has, and will enable him to continue in it as a civilian when his enlistment ends next May. My degrees definitely had real 'worth'. I had to have a Bachelor's Degree to keep my commission in the army. Then I had to get a Masters to get promoted beyond major. And then I needed my PhD to teach college courses. On the other hand, my late father ran a 1000 store retail company very well with one year of college! And a close friend has five very successful auto body repair shops and he didn't go to college. Another friend and neighbor is a master plumber, and a fine one... no college there either. The value of any sort of degree depends entirely on what you need it for and what you do with it. Some are indeed 'worthless'... and some are woth pure gold. Some careers need them (medical doctors and dentists, lawyers, accountants, engineers), and some careers only use them as 'dues paying' things while the degree itself means nothing in terms of helping with the job. Non subject specific education degrees come to mind here. the college level courses i had to take to get my Massachusetts teaching certificate in chemistry were totally WORTHLESS!!!!...totally 'dues paying' crap. I was not considered 'qualified' to teach high school chemistry or physics even though I WAS teaching college level chemistry with a PhD at the time! But I wanted to teach high school students so I wasted my time and money and took the ridiculous, meaningless, unnecessary, and worthless ed courses... I have no strong feelings about this of course . I've long been a loud proponent of doing away with this in Massachusetts...with zero success of course... teachers union loves such things so politicians are their usual cowardly selves. I think the union was happy when I retired last June.... no such idiocy re: my college teaching of course.


Don't you just love my subtlety????


Anyway, the whole degree thing depends on the career field... some justifiably need degrees, and many, if not most, do not.


Ken



\


At the age of 32, I'm back in school and I think it's absolutely ridiculous that I am required to take so many courses that have nothing to do with my major. Courses which add to the time I'll be in school. I'm in school under COVB (Child of a Veteran Benefits) so I don't have the additional student loans from courses that won't help me later, but I know many students that do.




Hey, don't feel bad. I'm thinking that at age 42 and after a career that lasted nearly two decades, I'm going to have to go back in order to stay relevant and employable in today's market. As far as courses that have "nothing to do with the major" -- sometimes, those are the best thing about going to college. They are the ones that really expand your mind and broaden your perspective -- which to me, is what getting an education is really all about.


For example, the logic course I took way back in the dinosaur days (LOL) remians one of my favorites and the most usefull, in terms of overall life skills. And it had nothing to do with either my major or my two minors.




I agree to a point.  For those of us like me who are back in school full-time and working full-time, the classes that have nothing to do with my major just cause a headache.  I'm not reading anything for enlightenment or to broaden my perspective due to a lack of time. I'm reading to pass a test or write a paper.  If I didn't have to take the extra courses, I could focus on those that are in my major and actually gain something from the classes.  I think schools need to be more flexible for those working adults that are back in school and recognize that they're not in school for the same reasons as 18-24 year olds are and they don't have the same time available.





I always worked while I was in college. I had to, if I wanted any money to spend on myself. For one insane two-or-three month stretch, I actually worked three jobs and had a full load of classes. But then again, I was 22 at the time and had no other obligations in my life -- no spouse or girlfriend, no children, not even a pet.


But, you are right, most adults have more going on in their lives than an 18-24 year old. And I think more colleges are getting that, and trying to come up with programs that are more flexible and focused for adults going to school.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 9:02PM #74
solfeggio
Posts: 9,468

Jane -


I want to go off-topic for just a moment to ask you something about your grandson who has cerebral palsy.  My seven-year-old grandson has athetoid cerebral palsy, and I was wondering if this is the same thing as the severe floppy cerebral palsy that afflicts your grandson.  Like your daughter, our daughter and her husband have virtually dedicated their lives to trying to find ways of making their son's life easier. 


You said that your grandson needs a 'scribe.'  What, exactly, is that, and how does it work?  Our grandson does not have the power of speech, and his muscles are so weak that he has a hard time even holding a spoon.  So, as you can see, it's very difficult for him to communicate.


Does your grandson go to a school for special needs children?  Our grandson goes to such a school five days a week, and he seems to like it very much.  We're fortunate that our government provides many services for special needs people, as well as medical care whenever it is needed. 


If you or your daughter would like to pass along any tips or information that we might find useful in dealing with our little guy's illness, I'd appreciate it. 


Thank you.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 9:40PM #75
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:02PM, solfeggio wrote:


Jane -


I want to go off-topic for just a moment to ask you something about your grandson who has cerebral palsy.  My seven-year-old grandson has athetoid cerebral palsy, and I was wondering if this is the same thing as the severe floppy cerebral palsy that afflicts your grandson.  Like your daughter, our daughter and her husband have virtually dedicated their lives to trying to find ways of making their son's life easier. 


You said that your grandson needs a 'scribe.'  What, exactly, is that, and how does it work?  Our grandson does not have the power of speech, and his muscles are so weak that he has a hard time even holding a spoon.  So, as you can see, it's very difficult for him to communicate.


Does your grandson go to a school for special needs children?  Our grandson goes to such a school five days a week, and he seems to like it very much.  We're fortunate that our government provides many services for special needs people, as well as medical care whenever it is needed. 


If you or your daughter would like to pass along any tips or information that we might find useful in dealing with our little guy's illness, I'd appreciate it. 


Thank you.




Solf


I'll be glad to share what I know.


I'm not sure of my grandson's exact diagnosis--my daughter calls it floppy Cerebral Palsy. Joe has partial use of his right hand only--just enough to manage his power wheelchair, provided by Medicaid. He has been in various therapies since he was six months old, including speech therapy so he can speak but has to form each word with care. We are fortunate to be in a metro area with therapies available. Joe cannot feed himself, etc.


He is very bright and my daughter spent two years before he started school making certain he would be mainstreamed with parapro personal help. In higher math he needs a "scribe" who understands the processes who can write down the advanced equations and graphing Joe can do in his head.


He is also very funny and can hang out when he is comfortable. He even ran for class president in the 8th grade this year. We're hoping he can go to GA TECH--his mom is a grad.


I'll see if my daughter has info we can pass on.


Last Saturday his mom and I went to the supermarket together. Told her I wished I could get Joe a New Orleans Saints tee-shirt to watch the game on Sunday. Joe loves American football and Super Bowl Sunday is huge for him. My daughter said she would pick up a tee-shirt for me.


Jane




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5 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 9:51PM #76
solfeggio
Posts: 9,468

Jane -


So nice of you to reply so quickly.  I see it is 10:00 p.m. there.  Here, it is 3:40 p.m. in the afternoon of Wednesday.  This is when I'm often online in the discussions, but because of the time differences people are usually logging off about now, so I rarely get to 'talk' to people in real time.


Anyway, I'm going to tell my daughter everything you said, and ask her if she knows about getting a scribe for our little Phoenix.  He has a wheelchair, too, but he is too weak to even be able to push a button to make it go.


BTW:


You had said you live in Atlanta.  I'm very familiar with the state of Georgia, because we spent much time there many years ago on a long visit.  When we visited Atlanta, we made sure to drive down Peachtree Street on purpose, because we knew of it from Gone With the Wind!  We saw the zoo, too, which was very modern, and the Cyclorama, which was very impressive.


Even after all these years, we have very fond memories of Georgia, with its beautiful camellias, friendly people, and lovely red earth.  When we saw that President Jimmy Carter had been governor of Georgia, we automatically liked him!  He may not have been the greatest president, but we still liked him anyway.  He and his wife are good people, just like other Georgians.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 10, 2010 - 8:59AM #77
Girlchristian
Posts: 11,552

Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:02PM, solfeggio wrote:


Jane -


I want to go off-topic for just a moment to ask you something about your grandson who has cerebral palsy.  My seven-year-old grandson has athetoid cerebral palsy, and I was wondering if this is the same thing as the severe floppy cerebral palsy that afflicts your grandson.  Like your daughter, our daughter and her husband have virtually dedicated their lives to trying to find ways of making their son's life easier. 


You said that your grandson needs a 'scribe.'  What, exactly, is that, and how does it work?  Our grandson does not have the power of speech, and his muscles are so weak that he has a hard time even holding a spoon.  So, as you can see, it's very difficult for him to communicate.


Does your grandson go to a school for special needs children?  Our grandson goes to such a school five days a week, and he seems to like it very much.  We're fortunate that our government provides many services for special needs people, as well as medical care whenever it is needed. 


If you or your daughter would like to pass along any tips or information that we might find useful in dealing with our little guy's illness, I'd appreciate it. 


Thank you.




Solf, I don't know if this will help as I don't know much, but a friend of mine's daughter has CP and is not able to speak (she can grunt and laugh, but not a whole lot more than that).  She has a computer system that attaches to her wheelchair that allows her to "speak." There is a "dot" that goes on her forehead and is a laser pointer of some sort so she can use it to "type" out words and then the computer speaks for her.  She's even been able to speak to people in different languages through it. I know Medicaid pays for it, but I don't know more than that.

"No matter how dark the moment, love and hope are always possible." George Chakiris

“For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don't believe, no proof is possible.” Stuart Chase
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5 years ago  ::  Feb 10, 2010 - 5:17PM #78
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Feb 9, 2010 -- 9:51PM, solfeggio wrote:


Jane -


So nice of you to reply so quickly.  I see it is 10:00 p.m. there.  Here, it is 3:40 p.m. in the afternoon of Wednesday.  This is when I'm often online in the discussions, but because of the time differences people are usually logging off about now, so I rarely get to 'talk' to people in real time.


Anyway, I'm going to tell my daughter everything you said, and ask her if she knows about getting a scribe for our little Phoenix.  He has a wheelchair, too, but he is too weak to even be able to push a button to make it go.


BTW:


You had said you live in Atlanta.  I'm very familiar with the state of Georgia, because we spent much time there many years ago on a long visit.  When we visited Atlanta, we made sure to drive down Peachtree Street on purpose, because we knew of it from Gone With the Wind!  We saw the zoo, too, which was very modern, and the Cyclorama, which was very impressive.


Even after all these years, we have very fond memories of Georgia, with its beautiful camellias, friendly people, and lovely red earth.  When we saw that President Jimmy Carter had been governor of Georgia, we automatically liked him!  He may not have been the greatest president, but we still liked him anyway.  He and his wife are good people, just like other Georgians.




I always wanted to go to one of Jimmy Carter's Sunday School classes although I am not Baptist. Unfortunately his own party did him in when he was President. He and Rosalyn are decent people. I admire their work in Habitat for Humanity. Georgia can be a charming place to live: there is a civility that remains even with all of us from different parts of the country. In the spring North Georgia is spectacular with the dogwoods, azaleas and then the magnolias.


Last evening I was thinking of Joe's ongoing therapies: physical for strength, occupational for finer motor skills and the karate the family pays for. Joe does karate a half-hour a week in a private session with his master: on the floor on a mat. The karate helps with his strength, breathing and can-do attitude. Many kudos to his master.


Jane




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5 years ago  ::  Feb 17, 2010 - 11:00AM #79
Merope
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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 7:21PM #80
Karma_yeshe_dorje
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