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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 12:09AM #1
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,802

At 16:02, outside is 36°C. Unfortunately the housing in my suburb averages a low energy efficiency rating (EER). At night I open all windows and doors. And I have a portable evaporative cooler. Still I have suffered insomnia all summer! Tongue out


Do you have any thoughts on home siting, orientation, shading, insulation and air conditioning?Photovoltaic chart

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5 years ago  ::  Apr 12, 2010 - 6:34AM #2
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,802
Paid for by a government environmental employment scheme, my ceiling cavity got filled with thick fibreglass insulation batts.
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4 years ago  ::  Dec 12, 2010 - 8:24PM #3
posterboy
Posts: 91

I don't have an  air conditioner.  All I do if it gets a little warm is set a fan in the window after about 8 pm to cool the bedroom off.  By that time the outside air is about 70 degrees.  This is known as Canadian air conditioning.

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4 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2011 - 10:22AM #4
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,802

G'day posterboy:


I presume that you meant Fahrenheit.


I moved to a new house with the top energy efficiency rating. I put my evaporative cooler upwind of the rest of the house.

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 02, 2011 - 3:29AM #5
posterboy
Posts: 91
Hi Karma-Yeshe-Dorje

I meant Fahrenheit of course.  Canada has been officially metric for about thirty years and we use Celsius.  Americans do most of the posting on Beliefnet and I know for sure they have the antiquated system.  Certainly I prefer metric because of the obvious and convenient relationship between volume, specific gravity, and weight.  It might interest you that the Canadian Imperial gallon  was 20% more in volume than the American one.  During the reign of Queen Anne, wine merchants complained that they were unfairly taxed because 20% of their cask volume was wastage from sediment.  So what did the crazy English  do?  They created a special larger wine gallon.  Over time the big gallon was adopted as standard in British North America, and the smaller one was adopted in the United States.  An American Quart is less than a litre but the old Imperial quart was 1.14 litres. Nevertheless they were both English gallons originaly.

English weights and measures  were standardized during the reign of Henry II to facilitate consistent tax collection and not through altruism on the part of the King.  Tradition says that his reach from the tip of his nose to the end of his middle finger was the yard, and the thickness of his thumb the inch, and of course his foot was the standard foot.  I am glad that we have a system  now that is based on science rather than on the fact that our ancestors had a King with big feet. Speaking of Kings (but not cabbages!)have you seen "The King's Speech"?

All the best,
Posterboy
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 02, 2011 - 3:50PM #6
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,802
Hello posterboy:

Thanks for the entertaining story. The metre, I recall, was based on a distance measured from Paris.

I normally like to chat lots (on forums) before claiming new friends here. If you click my handle, you can find the forums where I'm currently posting. I have recently been posting on Hot Topics, World & US News, and Village Green.

I have been able to do more in my new home this summer, than I had in my previous one in hot weather. But I have still been wiped out for many hours during the last week.

Since yesterday, cyclonic weather far north in Queensland, has dumped rain here also. That knocked the top temperature down 8 °C. Today's forecast is for a top of 30 °C. 
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10 months ago  ::  Feb 23, 2014 - 7:02AM #7
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 12,802
I have been trying to keep my ferns moist. But my hand-watering is sporadic! And they tend to die back in summer.
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