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Switch to Forum Live View New Year's Good Luck Food
4 years ago  ::  Jan 02, 2010 - 4:56PM #1
Lahnjules
Posts: 14

First of all, I wish all of you the bestest (not a typo but a borrowed term  from my son :-D) new year!

I had the delicious, comforting,  Korean traditional food called dduk-guk for the new year. I believe  eating dduk-guk on January 1st is meant  to bring good luck to me with a long life.

This got me wondering, “What is considered the “good luck” food in other countries or according to different beliefs?”  I would love to hear it if anyone has something to share about the topic.


Below is a video showing  what dduk-guk looks like and how it's  prepared. Yum!







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4 years ago  ::  Jan 07, 2010 - 3:30PM #2
hopethrufaith
Posts: 92

In the South black-eyed peas are eaten on New Years for good luck in the new year. I don't know why and I am not sure if I ever knew (my mom says she forgot why) so I think finding out will have to be my next Google search.

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4 years ago  ::  Jan 13, 2010 - 12:56PM #3
darcamani
Posts: 2,152

Ah food and folk lore.  With in  my family food stories  beans / black eyed peas especially meant abunance the (eye)  being the future.   The beans plump when they are cooked so a little goes a long way. The greens served with them  stand for loose money, folded bills, fun money.  The rice is always for sustanence and fertility.


My next and first New Year experience is Ths Chinese New Year.   I am caucasian and my Chinese partner  and her family is including me this year.  


I hear I am in for a real treat.:) Something tells me no black eyed peas will be there, but I bet you beans of some kind in some way will be... and rice and greens and  banquet foods I am thrilled to get a chance to taste for the very first time.


dar


 

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4 years ago  ::  Jan 14, 2010 - 8:37AM #4
hopethrufaith
Posts: 92

Yummm, it all sounds good. Thanks for the info. about the black-eyed peas, etc. Good eating at the celebration.Cool

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4 years ago  ::  Jan 14, 2010 - 8:41AM #5
hopethrufaith
Posts: 92

Oh yeah...don't forget the "hog jowls". (not so "yummm")


Traditional New Year foods are also thought to bring luck. Many cultures believe that anything in the shape of a ring is good luck, because it symbolizes "coming full circle," completing a year's cycle. For that reason, the Dutch believe that eating donuts on New Year's Day will bring good fortune.


Many parts of the U.S. celebrate the new year by consuming black-eyed peas. These legumes are typically accompanied by either hog jowls or ham. Black-eyed peas and other legumes have been considered good luck in many cultures. The hog, and thus its meat, is considered lucky because it symbolizes prosperity. Cabbage is another "good luck" vegetable that is consumed on New Year's Day by many. Cabbage leaves are also considered a sign of prosperity, being representative of paper currency. In some regions, rice is a lucky food that is eaten on New Year's Day.

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4 years ago  ::  Jan 14, 2010 - 2:50PM #6
darcamani
Posts: 2,152

:).


Back in the day what ever parts of what ever critter was givin to the "help", during the holidays.  It was simply dinner until white people decided it actually tasted good.   It was the 'peas and greens'  that made the dinner.   It was the gift of the leftover pig that made  this special.   It gave hope  to folk who had little else.


The pork by products were leftovers. . Hocks,jowls, tail... it was the african cooks that added these to greens to serve their masters, mainly because that was what they had and sustained their own families, this practice  simply went to the big house by default. 


This story comes from a very old black woman who told me  this was the why behind the meal.  She  comes from a family that remains 'help'.   They got their 40 acres and a mule and loads of cooking tradition that comes from afar.


That aside, I can't wait to find out what Chinese New Year holds.  I think duck is involved.


dar


 

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