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Switch to Forum Live View Bake Temp for Quick Bread
5 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2008 - 11:52PM #1
ManzanitaBear
Posts: 946
I need input from someone who really knows baking on this one:

Will quick bread come out right if it's baked at a temperature 75 - 100 F lower than the recipe calls for, but for longer?  Is there a way to determine how much longer?  Would adjustments need to be made to the recipe (i.e. more or less liquid)?
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2008 - 12:08AM #2
mountain_man
Posts: 38,095
[QUOTE=ManzanitaBear;898794]I need input from someone who really knows baking on this one:

Will quick bread come out right if it's baked at a temperature 75 - 100 F lower than the recipe calls for, but for longer?  Is there a way to determine how much longer?  Would adjustments need to be made to the recipe (i.e. more or less liquid)?[/QUOTE]
If you want a heavy, thick crusted, bread you can cook at lower temps. I wouldn't though.

What's wrong with baking at the regular temp?
Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2008 - 12:31AM #3
ManzanitaBear
Posts: 946
I'm also baking something that needs a much lower temp, and they'll both need to come out of the oven about the same time.  If I baked them separately, one would get cold in the time it took to bake the other, and they both need to be served warm.  And I have only one oven!
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2008 - 12:02PM #4
mountain_man
Posts: 38,095
[QUOTE=ManzanitaBear;898830]I'm also baking something that needs a much lower temp, and they'll both need to come out of the oven about the same time.  If I baked them separately, one would get cold in the time it took to bake the other, and they both need to be served warm.  And I have only one oven![/QUOTE]
That won't work with bread. While it is nice just out of the oven, it really does need time to finish. As the bread cools there are some chemical reactions going on that give the bread some body and help it to say up. You can't slice bread right out of the oven. It's just too soft. Bake the bread the day before and put it in a bread warmer an hour or so before you serve it.
Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2008 - 12:42PM #5
ManzanitaBear
Posts: 946
I'm talking about biscuits or muffins, not a loaf of bread.  And I don't have a bread warmer.  I've never even heard of them.

The other thing needs to bake for at least an hour, and would probably burn if baked at a much higher temperature than called for.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2008 - 11:05PM #6
mountain_man
Posts: 38,095
[QUOTE=ManzanitaBear;899483]I'm talking about biscuits or muffins, not a loaf of bread.  And I don't have a bread warmer.  I've never even heard of them.


Biscuits have to reach a certain temp in order to rise. The baking soda and baking power have to reach, I forget the exact temp, for the chemical reaction to make the gasses that cause the batter to rise. I use my grandmothers bread warmer. No one has them any more since people buy store bought sliced bread/tasteless sponge instead of making their own.

The other thing needs to bake for at least an hour, and would probably burn if baked at a much higher temperature than called for.[/QUOTE]
Then, like I said, bake the muffins the day before and reheat them. It will turn out better that way.

One thing to think about:
The turkey has to sit for at least 20 minutes before you carve it. Take the bird out, raise the temp and cook the muffins while the turkey is "resting."

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 17, 2008 - 12:57PM #7
ManzanitaBear
Posts: 946
[QUOTE=mountain_man;900642]
One thing to think about:
The turkey has to sit for at least 20 minutes before you carve it. Take the bird out, raise the temp and cook the muffins while the turkey is "resting."[/QUOTE]

Who said anything about turkey?  That's not what I'm baking.  It's vegetarian stew in a pumpkin, and that would get cold while the muffins or biscuits baked, since they take 20 - 30 minutes.  And it really does need to be served shortly after it's done, because the pumpkin gets mushy and starts to collapse.

Besides, turkey can cook at higher temperatures.  All that changes is the time it takes to cook it.  Stew in a pumpkin is more likely to burn.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 17, 2008 - 1:01PM #8
mountain_man
Posts: 38,095
[QUOTE=ManzanitaBear;901607]Who said anything about turkey?  That's not what I'm baking.  It's vegetarian stew in a pumpkin, and that would get cold while the muffins or biscuits baked, since they take 20 - 30 minutes.  And it really does need to be served shortly after it's done, because the pumpkin gets mushy and starts to collapse.

Besides, turkey can cook at higher temperatures.  All that changes is the time it takes to cook it.  Stew in a pumpkin is more likely to burn.[/QUOTE]
I had no idea what else you were baking. You never mentioned.

It's your kitchen. Cook it the way you want to. ;)
Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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5 years ago  ::  Nov 17, 2008 - 1:34PM #9
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849
Can you bake the biscuits/muffins ahead of time and then re-heat them? I find this works for me.

I'm thinking either re-heat biscuits/muffins in the oven with the pumpkin for the final 10-15 minutes of pumpkin baking time,  or warm them (wrapped) in the microwave.  The microwave will make the biscuits/muffins soft, so factor this into your approach.

Lower baking temps for quick cooking breads (like biscuits/muffins) means that they won't rise as you would expect them to.  This can result in "hockey pucks" -something not as light and fluffy as folks expect biscuits/muffins to be.   It won't be entirely inedible.  Check with toothpick to assure centers are done- not doughy or batter-like.

ARe you using double-acting baking powder in the muffins/biscuits? That can help- some. It rises a bit without incr. temps -and then more in the hot oven - but, as mountain man pointed out, the lower temps are less than optimal for proper rising. 



Irene.
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