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Switch to Forum Live View Living on the cheap
6 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2008 - 12:46PM #1
RiverMoonlady
Posts: 773
I've been pinching pennies for most of my life - I learned it from my parents.

Here is the simplest hint:  IF YOU CAN'T AFFORD IT, DON'T BUY IT!

I'll be back with more later.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 15, 2008 - 12:33PM #2
REteach
Posts: 13,547
Cooking yourself can be huge, too.

A ham, for example, might seem expensive, but after having baked ham, I have a bone for ham soup--and dried beans are really cheap.  I can make scalloped potatoes and ham, and potatoes are cheap.  I can make red beans and rice, and rice is cheap.  I can make scrambled eggs and ham and eggs are cheap.  We can get a lot of means from one ham.
I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize what you heard was not what I meant...
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 16, 2008 - 12:45PM #3
RiverMoonlady
Posts: 773
Use those wonderful leftovers to make cheap lunches for your children and to take to work, too.  Why buy "Lunchables" and single-serving packages of ANYTHING when  you can do the same at home with a box of cheap sandwich bags, or even better, reusable containers?

Give up on restaurants and fast food.  Cooking a great meal at home does NOT require exotic ingredients or gourmet chef skills.  Fresh, locally-grown food can be gotten in many areas and is so much better for you and for the environment.

And, BOTTLED WATER - one of my pet peeves!!!  Did you know that bottled water costs 1,900 times more than tap water?  Buy good-quality containers with a wide opening (so that you can add ice) and fill them with tap water (or spring water, if you can get it cheaply) for you and your kids to take to work, soccer games, etc.  If your tap water isn't very tasty, it is worth it to buy a good water filtering system.

Cheap is great!!
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 17, 2008 - 10:05AM #4
Pam34
Posts: 2,637
Unless you have really advanced washers and dryers, they aren't USING any energy when they are off, so flipping the breaker is useless. But the items that DO pull power when 'off' are the TV, the computer and other electronics. Those you can plug into a power strip, and turn the strip off when you are 'done' using the electronics. The only drawback is the loss of 'instant on' features.

Other easy habits - turn the lights off when you leave the room.
Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 20, 2008 - 10:26AM #5
IreneAdler
Posts: 2,849
Really think about what you are buying and where you make your purchases. 

Buying in large bulk sizes isn’t always cheapest – do the math.  In some cases, the cost per ounce or serving is more expensive in the bulk size than the regular size. Couldn’t hurt toting around a small calculator to facilitate doing these calculations while you shop. 

Also, items aren’t always cheapest at the warehouse store.  Again, do the math- and be sure to factor in the annual membership fee- if any.

I have a deep freezer at home. Really handy -and cost effective-to stock up on items that can be stored frozen.  But keep track of what you put into freezer- otherwise you may end up with something inedable if it's been in the freezer way too long.

Irene.
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 20, 2008 - 12:51PM #6
Agnosticspirit
Posts: 9,253
Cooking from scratch is the best way to reduce your food bill. And when you cook from scratch, you have greater control over the ingredients in your food. I buy organic whenever possible and cook in more quantities than I'll need. Place leftovers in single serving containers and stick them in the freezer for those times when I don't have the time or energy to cook.  At this time, dining out in restaurants is now considered a treat, not a way of life. I've saved money and even lost a few pounds.

Stopping at Starbucks everyday for a daily cup of joe went out the window a long time ago. I rarely go there any more.

I've learned how to make a lot of personal toiletries and skincare myself and purchase the raw ingredients from ethical and smaller companies. Not only do I save $$ but I'm supporting companies that don't test on animals, promote fair trade ethics and the organic and bio-dynamic small farmers as well.

Before I take a longer road trip, I calculate how much I'll spend in gas and sometimes find I'll save money by taking the bus or train instead. One of the great advantages of living in a metro area with a built-in public transportation infrastructure as well.

And Yeah, I used to be a bottled water junkie too. Weaned myself off of that by buying a Britta water bottle for my refrigerator. The water container cost $25.00, I pay $12 USD for 2 filters that'll last for 4 months. Not only do I have filtered water available at all times for cooking, tea and coffee, but when I head out for my long walks I fill up a bottle of water to take along. Better for my wallet, better for the environment.

Oh, buy spices in the plastic bags, usually found in the Mexican food section of your grocery store and fill up the old glass containers for your spices. So much is spent on packaging.

On clothing - I've shopped places like TJMaxx, Ross, Marshalls, Nordstrom's Rack and other great discount fashion outlets for years. No plans to change that at all.... :D Who was it that said you don't need to spend a million to look like a million? Very wise, whoever said that... ;)
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 20, 2008 - 4:36PM #7
natureboy_the0
Posts: 1,740

RiverMoonlady wrote:

I've been pinching pennies for most of my life - I learned it from my parents.

Here is the simplest hint: IF YOU CAN'T AFFORD IT, DON'T BUY IT!


Yeshua's teaching in Matthew 6:24-34 eliminates house, utilities, shoes and clothing costs. I find that walking eliminates auto and fuel cost. I find being able to eat raw from any vegetable having a seed eliminates food cost. The only thing I have to pay is the sharing of my expriences in living the gospel brought by him.

However, if United Statesman want to continue to live socially they should, as the Declaration of Independence suggests, overthrow this government to impliment a "service for Survival" government that if a person don't work they don't eat.  That would eliminate the national debt, government corruption, court corruption, police corruption, crimes of greed and need, taxation and classes.  Why should the people with the least be servants to the people with the most money?  Eliminate that and the nation would beome a "Utopia" and nation of peace.


Elijah, aka, NatureBoy

Are you questioning your beliefs, ask I AM THAT I AM to clarify them!
Elijah Alfred "NatureBoy" Alexander, Jr. presenting SEEDS OF LIFE
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2008 - 12:51AM #8
Pam34
Posts: 2,637
Nice idea if you can survive that way - ninety percent of the world population likely can't.

No housing? It gets down to 40 below zero here - care to try to survive that without protection from the elements?
Vegetables? sure - we can grow potatoes and onions and hay. That's about it. The growing season is usually less than 90 days long. So we could eat potatoes and onions for a month or two. That leaves ten months of the year with hay, I suppose.
I am not a horse. Hay is not a human diet.

Walking? Let's see - I live in the nearest town to my work area, and that work area is 47 miles away. If I walk 3 miles per hour, I could walk to work in - what? - 15 plus hours? That doesn't work too well with a 24 hour day. I couldn't even get there and back in a day, much less work. Plus since I'm apparently shoeless, I don't think I'd even get there in the first place - too many rocks and thorns. Move closer you say? Not at option. The government owns most of the land and we can't camp out for more than two weeks in any one spot. There are two thousand of us working there. Where do we go?

Oh - and there's no way to grow anything without water, and water is scarce. plus of course, the growing season is still just 90 days - or less.

Of course, once you eliminate the government, we'll most all be dead anyway, which would certainly alleviate the food supply issues for the survivors. They could always eat each other.
Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2008 - 12:44PM #9
RiverMoonlady
Posts: 773
Unfortunately, I cannot walk to work - it's 25 miles each way - but I pick up a friend who works in the same city and close to my job so that HER car is off the road.  She pays me a nominal amount for gas and insurance, but it is less than it would cost her to use her own car - plus my vehicle has 4-wheel drive (we get snow here) and air conditioning (which I rarely use), two things lacking in her car.

My brother used to bicycle to work and back frequently, but now works in other states.  He still has no gym membership (none of us do) and gets his exercise by biking, even riding in races.  I walk whenever possible and have managed to lose weight and increase my stamina by leaps and bounds - I am now up to walking as much as eight miles in a day.

Gym memberships are a waste of money.  Forget about them and use your imagination.  Walking is a perfect form of exercise if you do it with some vigor and swing your arms while you walk.  Stop to take a break and do some stretching, too.  Swimming is also great for you!
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5 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2008 - 1:49PM #10
RAFFEY
Posts: 49
Adding my two cents,coming from a family of have nots i was raised frugal and learned at a very young age how to budget which is now coming in very handy with savings.I suport teaching frugalness to children growing up to meet the demands of life in their future as it worked with me it cant hurt to raise a child up in the way they should go and they will not depart from it,responsibility is a very hard lesson to teach a child and falls in with budgeting but is well worth the investment to show why its necessary to save.Those of us hwo never had the privelage of opening a bank account as a child now know the inportance of obtaining a 401k never having the privilage of choosing a good diet having to purchase whatever we could afford with foodstamps and gov,aide now have to downsize/limit our monthly shoping list to the bare essentials, all this is being taught to my younger nieces/nephews as well as how the upcoming election may play a role in the economy,in short this is a good time to teach/show what life is all about while holding fast to faith in GOD we will get through these times as we,ve done in the past.
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