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Switch to Forum Live View The Poor and Being Fat
3 years ago  ::  Aug 20, 2011 - 5:21PM #11
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Fruit will make you fat if you eat enough of it.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 20, 2011 - 5:40PM #12
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
I like the Japanese phrase, hara hachibu, which means you're wise to eat only until you estimate you're about 80% full. Stop when you'd like to eat more and don't yet feel full.

Another method that I still use when stressed is the one-bowl one. Find a bowl that holds about a cupful of food, a bowl that you can hold easily in one hand as you eat. Fill the bowl close to but not entirely to the top, and if you have much difficulty sensing when you feel full, go to another room and sit facing a blank wall or corner if you usually eat with others. Focus upon each bite individually before picking up another, eating with chopsticks preferably. A good means of eating more deliberately, making me less likely to shovel in food without being aware how much I was consuming.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 20, 2011 - 5:42PM #13
solfeggio
Posts: 9,346

There was a piece in the LA 'Times' last month about a study that was done showing that access to supermarkets did not necessarily mean that poor people were going to be eating better:


articles.latimes.com/2011/jul/17/health/...


It was quite an extensive study, and it showed that the biggest factors involved in low-income people's diets were income and proximity to fast food restaurants.  And then, there was the fact that supermarkets contain a lot of processed foods that are just as fattening as fast food, and just as tempting to the shopper.


I've read that 'healthy' foods are supposed to be more expensive than fast food, but I've never believed that because I just can't see where a bag of apples, oatmeal, rice, onions, or potatoes, or a box of pasta, which will last a family for a week at the very least, would be, in the long run, more expensive than $5 worth of burgers, fries and cokes that constitute only one meal for maybe one or two persons.


Then, note this piece saying that one in four California families cannot afford food for their kids:


newamericamedia.org/2011/08/one-in-four-...


What I think is certainly one of the problems is that so many people simply don't know how to even boil water in order to cook potatoes or pasta or rice or oatmeal, don't know that chopping up onions and frying them will add flavour to just about any dish, and that apples can be cooked down into applesauce which can be very tasty.


People sorely need to be educated in cooking skills and food values so that they can make educated choices.


Here in NZ, Polynesian people are much more apt to be overweight than Caucasions, and they are also more likely to be in a lower income bracket.  Nevertheless, they frequent the local MacDonalds and KFC and Starbucks.  


And I'm sorry to say that recent newspaper article pointed out that New Zealand has now become equal with the U.S. in percentages of fat people.  This is not something to be proud of.


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 20, 2011 - 10:20PM #14
rabello
Posts: 21,683

There is a difference between the medical term "overweight" and the medical term "obesity".   So when the experts: medical/public health/sociologists talk about the "obesity epidemic," they aren't talking about the "overweight epidemic" and severe or morbid obesity certainly does follow socioeconomic divisions.  

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 5:19AM #15
Wanderingal
Posts: 5,504

Aug 20, 2011 -- 1:36PM, TemplarS wrote:


Well, I've known overweight rich people, and overweight poor people.


But perhaps not all overweight is equal?


Like Erey, I'm probably technically overweight, and I'm certainly not poor.  But so far as I can see, this is not from eating low quality "junk" food.  I hate McDonalds, don't like french fries or most other fried food, I don't eat much cake or pie or cookies for dessert, and I don't drink soft drinks.


I eat a lot of veggies, and I eat a lot of fish and seafood, and I eat a lot of fruit.  But, perhaps, a lot is the operative word.  I eat big portions. I can afford to, in any event, and so can other rich people.  Calories are calories, so the weight goes on.  


But I don't consume "empty" calories, so in terms of nutrition I imagine I'm doing okay.


 But I wonder if poor people who are overweight  can say the same thing.  Maybe they do in fact consume (or are forced to consume for lack of alternatives) more foods which give the calories but not the nutrition? 




Unless you are doing a LOT of weightlifting and the weight you've added is muscle mass--then your body is storing those calories as FAT--same as the unhealthy FAT the people who eat junk food are carrying.


Interessting how we see food snobbery-IE--


"My fat gain is 'healthier' than your fat gain...."


NO it's not.


BTW--I've seen autopsiees performed on slender people and on fat people--and trust me--the fat that's stored inside fat people is NOT pretty--not in the least.


 

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 5:29AM #16
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Solf, I think there's a good deal of merit in the belief that poor people eat fast food and highly processed foods because they don't know basic cooking techniques. Ability to read directions effectively may be another factor.

If a person can't read well, you're far more likely to gravitate toward selecting heat-and-eat foods.

And then, as you indicated, cooking healthy ingredients from scratch takes basic skills, determination, time and effort, things that even the working poor may not possess.

I'm amazed at reports on how few more affluent, well-educated Americans know how to cook and do so regularly.

I suspect that the appeal of fast food is in the satisfaction from fat and sugar-laden calories, too. Add that to ease and convenience, and it's no wonder that even more affluent people take the fast food path of least resistance.
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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 11:04AM #17
TemplarS
Posts: 6,865

Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:19AM, Wanderingal wrote:


 


"My fat gain is 'healthier' than your fat gain...."


NO it's not.




Oh, absolutely true.


But there are bad health effects to a poor diet other than weight.  There are vitamins, calcium and other minerals, fiber, micronutrients, antioxidants, omega oils.  You don't get these from a Coke and a super-size order of french fries.   


Excess of calories is not healthy, but excess of empty calories is in fact worse.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 12:34PM #18
newsjunkie
Posts: 5,748

Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:29AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

Solf, I think there's a good deal of merit in the belief that poor people eat fast food and highly processed foods because they don't know basic cooking techniques. Ability to read directions effectively may be another factor.   If a person can't read well, you're far more likely to gravitate toward selecting heat-and-eat foods.   And then, as you indicated, cooking healthy ingredients from scratch takes basic skills, determination, time and effort, things that even the working poor may not possess.   I'm amazed at reports on how few more affluent, well-educated Americans know how to cook and do so regularly.   I suspect that the appeal of fast food is in the satisfaction from fat and sugar-laden calories, too. Add that to ease and convenience, and it's no wonder that even more affluent people take the fast food path of least resistance.



I know how to cook, but sometimes I am just too lazy or too busy/tired or want the "treat" of eating out. A lot of people are much more busy than I am, and I think cooking is one of the easiest things to let fall by the wayside. For more affluent people, it's a lifestyle choice to focus more on work, or your kids' afterschool activities, than on having a home-cooked meal. For less affluent people, it might not be a choice.

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 1:06PM #19
TemplarS
Posts: 6,865

Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:29AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

 Cooking healthy ingredients from scratch takes basic skills, determination, time and effort, things that even the working poor may not possess.  




I'm not sure about skills.  Maybe so, but if so, there is a significant cultural loss going on.  In the old days (meaning, like when I was young), mothers had the skills, and passed them along.  But like any skills, don't use them, you lose them.  Poor families where perhaps people need to work multiple minimum wage jobs- time might also be a problem.


 



Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:29AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

 I'm amazed at reports on how few more affluent, well-educated Americans know how to cook and do so regularly.





Same issue, now you've got both parents working to afford the high life style.  No time or energy left to cook.  But at least these people can afford to go out and get a decent meal in a restaurant.


 


 


Maybe another contributing factor- single parents.  If one parent has to do it all, how much time or energy are they going to have left  for cooking?

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3 years ago  ::  Aug 21, 2011 - 1:50PM #20
mytmouse57
Posts: 9,782

Aug 21, 2011 -- 1:06PM, TemplarS wrote:


Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:29AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

 Cooking healthy ingredients from scratch takes basic skills, determination, time and effort, things that even the working poor may not possess.  




I'm not sure about skills.  Maybe so, but if so, there is a significant cultural loss going on.  In the old days (meaning, like when I was young), mothers had the skills, and passed them along.  But like any skills, don't use them, you lose them.  Poor families where perhaps people need to work multiple minimum wage jobs- time might also be a problem.


 



Aug 21, 2011 -- 5:29AM, DotNotInOz wrote:

 I'm amazed at reports on how few more affluent, well-educated Americans know how to cook and do so regularly.





Same issue, now you've got both parents working to afford the high life style.  No time or energy left to cook.  But at least these people can afford to go out and get a decent meal in a restaurant.


 


 


Maybe another contributing factor- single parents.  If one parent has to do it all, how much time or energy are they going to have left  for cooking?





 


That's so true. I used to love to cook. But it seems like I don't have any damn time for it lately. And I'm in a two-adult household.

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