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3 years ago  ::  Mar 06, 2012 - 3:42PM #1
Goyboy
Posts: 232
I am having trouble defending an element of the Jewish faith on a debate board that does not normally pertain to Judaism. Being that I myself am not a Jew, I am not permitted to post this topic on any community board that is restricted to Jews only.

In short, someone is insisting that Jews adhere to either henotheism or monolatrism, both being forms of polytheism. I have argued that Jews are strictly monotheists, that Jews believe that only one deity exists. 

So, how do I go about refuting this other person? I quoted from the Tanakh, but that doesn't seem to be sufficient.

The title of the debate thread in question is "Posthumous baptisms of Holocaust victims". If you want to see for yourself what is going on, then here is the address of the debate thread:
community.beliefnet.com/go/thread/view/4...
   


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3 years ago  ::  Mar 07, 2012 - 6:59AM #2
ffb
Posts: 2,259

Mar 6, 2012 -- 3:42PM, Goyboy wrote:

I am having trouble defending an element of the Jewish faith on a debate board that does not normally pertain to Judaism. Being that I myself am not a Jew, I am not permitted to post this topic on any community board that is restricted to Jews only.

In short, someone is insisting that Jews adhere to either henotheism or monolatrism, both being forms of polytheism. I have argued that Jews are strictly monotheists, that Jews believe that only one deity exists. 

So, how do I go about refuting this other person? I quoted from the Tanakh, but that doesn't seem to be sufficient.

The title of the debate thread in question is "Posthumous baptisms of Holocaust victims". If you want to see for yourself what is going on, then here is the address of the debate thread:
community.beliefnet.com/go/thread/view/4...
   



I wrote a complete reply that somehow got lost in between the "submit post" being clicked and the post's actually being posted.


Bottom line -- I'll ignore anyone's arguments from the archeological or "historical" record.


Theologically, Jews are monotheistic but accept that there are angels and other forces SUBSERVIENT to god (which some might mistake for god) and  that people take natural or artificial forces and might consider them gods. This does not make them gods.


So when the text says "don't have any other gods before me" it doesn't mean there are any, but only that people have a tendency to introduce and worship non-god figures as gods.


Others outside of Judaism might disagre, and, hey, what do I know about Judaism. I'm just a rabbi.

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 08, 2012 - 3:34PM #3
Goyboy
Posts: 232

Mar 7, 2012 -- 6:59AM, ffb wrote:

Mar 6, 2012 -- 3:42PM, Goyboy wrote:

I am having trouble defending an element of the Jewish faith on a debate board that does not normally pertain to Judaism. Being that I myself am not a Jew, I am not permitted to post this topic on any community board that is restricted to Jews only.

In short, someone is insisting that Jews adhere to either henotheism or monolatrism, both being forms of polytheism. I have argued that Jews are strictly monotheists, that Jews believe that only one deity exists. 

So, how do I go about refuting this other person? I quoted from the Tanakh, but that doesn't seem to be sufficient.

The title of the debate thread in question is "Posthumous baptisms of Holocaust victims". If you want to see for yourself what is going on, then here is the address of the debate thread:
community.beliefnet.com/go/thread/view/4...
   




I wrote a complete reply that somehow got lost in between the "submit post" being clicked and the post's actually being posted.


Bottom line -- I'll ignore anyone's arguments from the archeological or "historical" record.


Theologically, Jews are monotheistic but accept that there are angels and other forces SUBSERVIENT to god (which some might mistake for god) and  that people take natural or artificial forces and might consider them gods. This does not make them gods.


So when the text says "don't have any other gods before me" it doesn't mean there are any, but only that people have a tendency to introduce and worship non-god figures as gods.


Others outside of Judaism might disagre, and, hey, what do I know about Judaism. I'm just a rabbi.




Rabbi, thank you for your response to my inquiry. If you cannot post a comment on the other discussion thread (and please keep trying), then say here what you would say there, and I will pass your message to the other thread.

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