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5 years ago  ::  Feb 10, 2010 - 3:59PM #1
Velizabeth
Posts: 63

Hello everyone,


 


I have yet another question :) I've been looking around on the internet today and everywhere I've read says that Allah/God is neither male nor female, because Allah/God is not like humans. I can accept that. No problems there. I'm trying to remember because I read (not today) that the name Allah is male(?) and there's no female name... So my question is, if Allah can't be compared to humans, what would happen if someone said "She" instead of "He"? I'm just curious about this, I know its a weird question. I'm not trying to be disrespectful, honestly.. Since studying many different religions over the years, the thought that God can only be referred to as male is interesting to me...


 


Anyways,


 


Thanks for taking time with my questions :) Have a lovely day :)


Valerie

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 11, 2010 - 7:27AM #2
Abdullah.
Posts: 882

MashAllah a very good question Smile


Allah has been reffered to in the Quran as 'He' and this is why Muslims use it too; the 'He' of the Quran is a grammatical masculine word and does not imply gender masculinity at all; here is an article that explains it more indepth:


qa.sunnipath.com/issue_view.asp?HD=7&ID=...


Linguists distinguish between natural gender and grammatical gender. Natural gender is determined by physiology: an animal with a male sex organ is naturally masculine, and an animal with a female sex organ is naturally feminine. [1]

Grammatical gender is determined by language convention, not physiology. To clearly understand the distinction between natural and grammatical gender, one must examine languages like French or Arabic, where nouns are always grammatically masculine or feminine, even when they don't have a natural gender.


... The Quran refers to Allah using the masculine pronoun huwa because the word "Allah" is grammatically masculine, not because Allah is naturally masculine (Allah be our refuge). In English, using "He" for something without natural gender connotes personification, but not in Arabic. There is no implied anthropomorphism whatsoever. Neither, as explained above, is there any trace of misogyny.


To affirm a natural gender for Allah Most High flatly contradicts the clear Quranic verse, "There is nothing whatsoever like unto Him." (Quran, 42:11) If this is plain for Muslims, it is confusing for others, not merely because purely grammatical masculinity is alien to the English mind, but also because no religion besides Islam affirms divine transcendence with such force.


hope this helps


Peace Smile

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 11, 2010 - 6:54PM #3
Velizabeth
Posts: 63

Thank you again for your useful information :) I'm leaving beliefnet for a while, if not for good. The front page makes me want to put my face through a wall :) (I hate politics, and that's all the front page is anymore).


I'll probably check out that site that you linked a lot (looks like a good site) and I found a muslim message board that seems really friendly.


Thank you for all your time and help. Take care :)

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 12, 2010 - 12:31PM #4
21stcenturylutheran
Posts: 8

The answer is a simple "Yes."  God (Allah) is the Mother/Father of all...  Grace & Peace  :-)


 

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 12, 2010 - 1:02PM #5
Abambagibus
Posts: 50

Abdullah’s phrase ‘purely grammatical masculinity is alien to the English mind’ is embedded with the haughtiness typical of an exclusivist committed to the belief that the affirmation of one’s cultural persona necessitates the negation of all personae culturally different enough to warrant negation for the sake of affirmation, thus engendering a behavioral loop.  Since a culture and its language are inevitably intertwined, might it not have been better if propriety had impelled him toward the use of the noun ‘language’ rather than mind?   


Abdullah’s phrase ‘no religion besides Islam affirms divine transcendence with such force’ is embedded with the haughtiness typical of an exclusivist committed to the belief that the affirmation of one’s religious persona necessitates the negation of all personae religiously different enough to warrant negation for the sake of affirmation, thus engendering a perpetual loop, … repetitively looping for the sake of self-assertion.   Repetition, of course, is the key, fitting a lock whose tumblers have fallen nearly, nigh nearly in place, yet out of place by dint of the rigidity of ego. 


Subliminally the ‘genderization’ of the ‘non-gendered’ is a gendered connection and naturally so, peculiarly.   Semitic or otherwise, patriarchal tongues speak with not so a hidden meaning.  And then there is that feminine language with feminine forks and masculine spoons, whose knives are very sharply neuter, a sister twice removed from English. 


If Abdullah believes that all who natively speak English conceive of God as masculine absolutely, then his acquaintance with Christianity is faint in thought, much less in deed.  Nevertheless, I venture to write that Abdullah is among a minority whose minds can truly see beyond the confines of the body, masculine or otherwise, and in a manner reminiscent of a minority of Christians.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 12, 2010 - 2:01PM #6
Globalnomad
Posts: 115

Re: "name Allah is male(?) and there's no female name" - first time I've heard of this (have been Muslim for a number of years now). I understand Allah/ God (Allah is just Arabic word for God, not a 'different' God to the Christian/ Jewish one, e.g. Christians in the Arabic speaking countries use the word Allah) is 'gender neutral' and when not the full word God is used in the Quran, translations have to compromise in so many languages in so many ways (e.g. languages like Dutch, French and German do have a 'gender neutral' version to refer to, while English only has 2 words - male & female). When I speak/ write about religion, as much as possible I try to use the word God so as to avoid as much as possible avoid any 'male bias'. My 2p. In peace, Rianne

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 11:47AM #7
scaramouche
Posts: 4

As Salaam Alaikum My Sister,


Allah is neither male nor female; Allah beget not, nor is He begotten. He has no beginning or ending. Allah is referred to as "He" in the Holy Quran because it would not be fitting to refer to God as "It" In my personal opinion, God is a "Spiritual Being" as opposed to flesh; and He dwells in all of us who surrenders to "His Will." Allah is the "Supreme Being."


 

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 12:54PM #8
bOB
Posts: 5

Poster #7 is correct.  Allah is neither male or female, and is referred by Himself as He in the Glorious Quran.  So what better example should one take?  Obvious inferences are made here as to the masculine being more powerful, for Allah is the Almighty.  He has 99 wonderful names and that can also be used.


Also Allah Tallah mentions people error when they refer to the Angels as feminine or she.  That they have no knowledge of what they speak of.  Many Christians do this.

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 1:12PM #9
langzaam
Posts: 243

Is Allah with the Islamic faith or God with the Christian faith a genderized word for Nature?

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5 years ago  ::  Feb 13, 2010 - 2:52PM #10
21stcenturylutheran
Posts: 8

In addition, since the Abrahamic faith traditions refer to human beings (both male and female) as the "image of God,"  then both the masculine spirit and the feminine spirit TOGETHER give us a whole reflection of God.  Therefore, while God is Spirit, God is not gender neutral, but God is gender inclusive.  God holds within God's own Being both the masculine and the feminine, and we (both male and female) are together a whole "image" of God.  So, again, God (Allah) is the Mother/Father of all...  Grace & Peace  :-) 

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