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Switch to Forum Live View Yoga Ashram, Hindu temple and Hare Krishna?
3 years ago  ::  Jun 01, 2015 - 12:29AM #1
rideronthastorm
Posts: 9,223
Can anyone tell me the differences between the Yoga Ashram, Hindu temples and Hare Krishna Temples?
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3 years ago  ::  Jun 02, 2015 - 4:04PM #2
rideronthastorm
Posts: 9,223

Well i know 9 of yall looked at it no replies? I guess its a stupid question...................

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 02, 2015 - 4:08PM #3
rideronthastorm
Posts: 9,223

So heres Wikis answer


Traditionally, an ashram (Sanskrit/Hindi: आश्रम) is a spiritual hermitage or a monastery.[1][2] Additionally, today the term ashram often denotes a locus of Hindu cultural activity such as yoga, music study or religious instruction, similar to a studio, yeshiva, iʿtikāf or dojo


So I guess a Yoga Ashram is only a culteral center for Hindus whcih is cool........

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 02, 2015 - 4:12PM #4
rideronthastorm
Posts: 9,223

Hinduism is the dominant religion, or way of life,[note 1] in South Asia, most notably India. It includes Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Shaktism[1] among numerous other traditions, and a wide spectrum of laws and prescriptions of "daily morality" based on karma, dharma, and societal norms. Hinduism is a categorisation of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid, common set of beliefs.[2] Hinduism, with about one billion followers[web 1] is the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam.


Hinduism has been called the "oldest religion" in the world,[note 2] and some practitioners refer to it as Sanātana Dharma, "the eternal law" or the "eternal way"[3] beyond human origins.[4] Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion[note 3] or synthesis[5][ 


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3 years ago  ::  Jun 02, 2015 - 4:16PM #5
rideronthastorm
Posts: 9,223

The International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON), known colloquially as the Hare Krishna movement or Hare Krishnas, is a Gaudiya Vaishnava religious organisation.[1] ISKCON was founded in 1966 in New York City by A. C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada who is worshipped by followers.[2] Its core beliefs are based on select traditional Hindu scriptures, particularly the Bhagavad-gītā and the Śrīmad Bhāgavatam. ISKCON says it is a direct descendant of Brahma-Madhva-Gaudiya Vaishnava Sampradaya.[3] The appearance of the movement and its culture come from the Gaudiya Vaishnava tradition, which has had adherents in India since the late 15th century and Western converts since the early 1900s in America,[4] and in England in the 1930s.[5]


ISKCON was formed to spread the practice of bhakti yoga, in which those involved (bhaktas) dedicate their thoughts and actions towards pleasing the Supreme Lord, Krishna.[6][7] ISKCON today is a worldwide confederation of more than 550 centres, including 60 farm communities, some aiming for self-sufficiency, 50 schools and 90 restaurants.[8] In recent decades the most rapid expansions in membership have been within Eastern Europe (especially since the collapse of the Soviet Union) and India.[9]





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3 years ago  ::  Jun 27, 2015 - 1:57AM #6
williejhonlo
Posts: 4,100

Jun 2, 2015 -- 4:12PM, rideronthastorm wrote:


Hinduism is the dominant religion, or way of life,[note 1] in South Asia, most notably India. It includes Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Shaktism[1] among numerous other traditions, and a wide spectrum of laws and prescriptions of "daily morality" based on karma, dharma, and societal norms. Hinduism is a categorisation of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid, common set of beliefs.[2] Hinduism, with about one billion followers[web 1] is the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam.


Hinduism has been called the "oldest religion" in the world,[note 2] and some practitioners refer to it as Sanātana Dharma, "the eternal law" or the "eternal way"[3] beyond human origins.[4] Western scholars regard Hinduism as a fusion[note 3] or synthesis[5][ 




Actually Hinduism is an umbrella term, there is no such word as Hinduism in the sanscrit dictionary. Sanatana dhama ( eternal occupation of the soul ) is the term hare krishnas use in describing their beliefs.

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3 years ago  ::  Jun 27, 2015 - 2:08AM #7
williejhonlo
Posts: 4,100

Jun 1, 2015 -- 12:29AM, rideronthastorm wrote:

Can anyone tell me the differences between the Yoga Ashram, Hindu temples and Hare Krishna Temples?


Some hindu temples worship Shiva or other gods in the hindu pantheon while hare krishnas worship only Krishna as the absolute truth.

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