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Switch to Forum Live View Questions regarding beliefs (Buddhism and Islam)
4 years ago  ::  Jun 05, 2014 - 5:07PM #1
Bcrafty07
Posts: 4
Hello everyone. So I had some questions to ponder on here. I had been practicing a bit of Buddhism for several years. 
What I like about Buddhism:
compassion towards all living things,
the Dalai Lama and what he shares with us (I enjoy some of his books),
it seems very flexible in practices


But last year I decided I wanted to learn about Islam, since I have some female friends who are Muslim. They are welcoming, friendly and really just never mentioned Islam unless I asked.
I kind of like what some of Islam has to say:
a merciful God,
lots and lots of intriguing info about science and the Quran,
a lot of respect for women,
a large community (where I live) whom are welcoming

Several things are very attractive:
having respect for others faiths and practices,
that my good deeds in life matter for the here and later,
that I just might be someone that God has a plan for. 

Yet I'm a critical thinker, I wonder "why" the prayers so often each day (which I've only read about) and why fasting during Ramadan? How can I tell if there is or has been a connection (my own personal one) with a God?  I grew up in a Christian home and never understood this "you should fear God" concept - or even if I felt a God existed. 
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4 years ago  ::  Jun 06, 2014 - 2:30AM #2
RevDorris
Posts: 1,815

Prayer in Islam shows submission to Allah or God.  5 times each day is a ritual called for in their scriptures.  No matter where you are or what you are doing, you are required to pray at specific times each day.


Fasting is called for only one time each year.  If you are not healthy enough to fast then you can skip this ritual till your health improves.  It is hard on the body, but designed to purify the body of toxins.  Again compliance with the ritual shows your submissiveness to what is required by that religion.


To experience a connection to God is a very personal thing.  For many it comes at times of great stress or extreme unhappiness.  Some experience it in a meditative state, when praying, walking in the woods, or sitting on a beach.  When that experience does come, in whatever way, you are filled with a sense of peace.  You know you are not alone and your heart and mind seem to be in agreement that all will be just fine.  Sometimes you will experience an electrifying feeling, the hairs on your body will stand up and seem to be alive.  You may even experience a flushed feeling that come from an overwhelming sense of love.  You will know when this connection happens but it will be impossible to fully explain the way you feel.  You may even know get feeling of Oneness with all life everywhere and know that the Spirit will carry your thoughts to wherever you wish them to go.  When it does happen your life is forever changed.

With love,

Rev Dorris
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4 years ago  ::  Jun 07, 2014 - 10:21AM #3
Bcrafty07
Posts: 4
Thank you Rev Dorris for replying. I suppose some of us (like myself) feel a sort of hesitation to 'submit' to a God. Especially when I feel uncertain that such a God exists.
Yet, a friend shared a video of the call to prayer - now that without a doubt, caused me to become still, the hairs on my arms raised, I felt moved by it. I still find myself wanting to learn more and read about Islam. It's hard to explain the pull towards it, even though I feel critical and ask a lot of questions.
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4 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2014 - 1:53AM #4
RevDorris
Posts: 1,815

May I recommend starting with The Koran, Everyman's Library Edition, 1992.  


ISBN 0-679-41736-2


and from


The Classics of Western Spirituality Series:


Ibn Al'Arabi, The Bezels of Wisdom. 1980.


ISBN 0-8091-2331-2

With love,

Rev Dorris
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