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4 years ago  ::  Mar 01, 2014 - 3:46PM #1
Earthquakequeen64
Posts: 22
I listened to an old talk and a portion of the talk made me very angry. The speaker was very young when his father died. He talked about a father/son outing and he wasn't able to go because he didn't have a father. The point of this was that he had to learn not to feel sorry for himself. Maybe so. What made me angry was that other father/son teams couldn't "adopt" this boy for the outing. Families are a big deal in the LDS Church. (I haven't got a family--no roots, no branches). I get the impression that being close to your family means excluding others--those who don't have a family or are from broken homes or those disowned by their families at baptism. I know I whined and complained about being alone at Christmas and I realized there were a number of things I could have done to be of service and I have made a note of it. It's true that I need to quit feeling sorry for myself and their are others who need to quit feeling sorry for themselves. I would like to point out some service that members of the church could do for those who are alone. A father/son team could have provided service by making the person a part of the family for the outing. Recently a friend of mine who had moved to another state came back to my ward to visit. She has tons of relatives in the ward. Anyway when she was in our ward she did all she could to make me a part of her family. She invited me to sit with her family and then went to talk with someone else. When I went to sit there someone else popped up and told me I couldn't sit there because the family was sitting there. I have sat in church alone all of my life. Even when I was married I sat alone in church because he often didn't come to church. I attend the temple alone. During General Conference I attend another denomination or I would be totally alone for two days. I watch conference later. I guess this is what being close to your family means.
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4 years ago  ::  Mar 01, 2014 - 7:10PM #2
MMCSFOX
Posts: 1,785

How sad Earthquake. Try to remember that all Wards are not like that one. Our Ward does make sure that all youth have an adult sponsor if a parent or other relative is not able to be with them Father / Son or Mother / Daughter events. This is standard practice in our Stake, my Brothers Stake and my Sisters Stake as we have talked about these things in the past. In our Ward we do not ask fathers to take crying children out of the Chapel but others of us old guys simply go over to assist that parent. We have found that “usually” someone other than a parent is different enough and more interesting than a parent so the child usually quiets, so it is fun for granddad or grandmamma and everybody still gets to hear the speakers. Mind you that is not published policy but was started by one of my favorite Bishops many years ago and we just like to do it. Holding seats in a pew is not very nice, yet we do try to keep enough area in a row for a large family so they do not have to be scattered around. Still that is one of the joke questions asked LDS. “How many generations has your family sat in the same pew? I agree it is not right to ask someone to move. In the service and visiting a Ward in another area I generally asked an usher where to sit. I know they do not all have ushers or greeters and I do like to sit near the front so I ask whoever is already in the row if it is ok and usually is. All in all I find differences make life more interesting.


Jesse


*


“If you pick up a stray dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. That is the principal difference between dog and man.”


(Mark Twain)


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4 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2014 - 1:34PM #3
MMCSFOX
Posts: 1,785

Years ago before my favorite Bishop was a Bishop he taught the Gospel Doctrine class where he would always tell the mother or father of a crying child “don’t leave and miss parts of the lesson, I will just talk louder so all can hear.” Generally the child would settle down quickly sometimes just moving from mom to dad or dad to mom is all it took. Of course there sometimes is one that would never be quite but at 30 you would think they would get over that.


Old weird Jesse


“We spend the first twelve months of our children's lives teaching them to walk and talk and the next twelve telling them to sit down and shut up.”


   -Phyllis Diller

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