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Switch to Forum Live View Secular Humanism's skepticism
2 years ago  ::  Jun 25, 2012 - 1:26PM #1
Aka_me
Posts: 12,298

it's no surprise that skepticism is the foundation of Secular Humanism...


Another aspect of the Secular Humanist tradition is skepticism. Skepticism's historical exemplar is Socrates. Why Socrates? Because, after all this time, he still stands out alone among all the famous saints and sages from antiquity to the present. Every religion has its sage. Judaism has Moses, Zoroastrianism has Zarathustra, Buddhism has the Buddha, Christianity has Jesus, Islam has Mohammad, Mormonism has Joseph Smith, and Bahai has Baha-u-lah. Every one of these individuals claimed to know the absolute truth.


while there are many Buddhists drinking from the cup of Secular Humanism (and nothing wrong with that), the question is:


can Secular Humanists explain why their skepticism prevents them from believing in Buddhist concepts such as enlightenment?

The UN says the ebola outbreak must be controlled within 60 days or else the world faces an "unprecedented" situation for which there is no plan.
this is absolutely fantastic as it unites the world into being OUR problem rather than THEIR problem.
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2 years ago  ::  Jun 30, 2012 - 10:43PM #2
JCarlin
Posts: 6,793

A reminder: This is a restricted board for those following secular philosophies. 

Jun 25, 2012 -- 1:26PM, Aka_me wrote:

can Secular Humanists explain why their skepticism prevents them from believing in Buddhist concepts such as enlightenment?


While many secular humanists are skeptical it is not in any way a basis of the philosophy.  Secular implies rejection of religions not because of skepticism per se, but because religions have nothing to offer people whose worldview revolves around other humans and not deities and myth no matter how popular or revered the originators of the myths are. 


Enlightment is a myth of escaping the tribulations of being human.  It is not skepticism but no interest in giving up the joys and, yes, the sorrows of living and loving as a human.  A Buddhist spends all to much time in useless meditation and chanting, that could be better used learning about, loving, and understanding other humans.  I am not skeptical of Budddhism, but what I have learned about it it has nothing to offer me as a humanist. 

J'Carlin
If the shoe doesn't fit, don't cram your foot in it and complain.
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 02, 2012 - 11:25PM #3
mountain_man
Posts: 39,701

Jun 25, 2012 -- 1:26PM, Aka_me wrote:

it's no surprise that skepticism is the foundation of Secular Humanism...


It is no surprise that you cannot, will not, understand that skepticism is not in any way a "foundation" of Secular Humanism. Why do you feel the need to lie about Secular Humanists like this?

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 05, 2012 - 10:06PM #4
Namchuck
Posts: 11,699

One could probably regard skepticism as fundamental to the paradigm of meritocratic rational inquiry.

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2 years ago  ::  Jul 06, 2012 - 9:38PM #5
mountain_man
Posts: 39,701

Jul 5, 2012 -- 10:06PM, Namchuck wrote:

One could probably regard skepticism as fundamental to the paradigm of meritocratic rational inquiry.


As it should be. Without skepticism one has no way of discerning fiction from reality. But skepticism certainly is not the backbone, or a major part, of Secular Humanism as someone here is trying to claim.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 23, 2012 - 7:00PM #6
Aka_me
Posts: 12,298

Jun 30, 2012 -- 10:43PM, JCarlin wrote:

A reminder: This is a restricted board for those following secular philosophies. 



Others may participate as respectful guests, to ask non-argumentitive questions or clarify a comment made here.


ok... then you'll want to update the forum guidelines.

The UN says the ebola outbreak must be controlled within 60 days or else the world faces an "unprecedented" situation for which there is no plan.
this is absolutely fantastic as it unites the world into being OUR problem rather than THEIR problem.
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2 years ago  ::  Jul 23, 2012 - 8:13PM #7
mountain_man
Posts: 39,701

Jul 23, 2012 -- 7:00PM, Aka_me wrote:

Others may participate as respectful guests, to ask non-argumentitive questions or clarify a comment made here.


ok... then you'll want to update the forum guidelines.


Those are the guidelines. You've never posted a respectful or non-argumentative question.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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2 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2012 - 12:32PM #8
BillThinks4Himself
Posts: 3,207

Jun 30, 2012 -- 10:43PM, JCarlin wrote:


A reminder: This is a restricted board for those following secular philosophies. 

Jun 25, 2012 -- 1:26PM, Aka_me wrote:

can Secular Humanists explain why their skepticism prevents them from believing in Buddhist concepts such as enlightenment?


While many secular humanists are skeptical it is not in any way a basis of the philosophy.  Secular implies rejection of religions not because of skepticism per se, but because religions have nothing to offer people whose worldview revolves around other humans and not deities and myth no matter how popular or revered the originators of the myths are. 


Enlightment is a myth of escaping the tribulations of being human.  It is not skepticism but no interest in giving up the joys and, yes, the sorrows of living and loving as a human.  A Buddhist spends all to much time in useless meditation and chanting, that could be better used learning about, loving, and understanding other humans.  I am not skeptical of Budddhism, but what I have learned about it it has nothing to offer me as a humanist. 



That is about as concise and power-packed an explanation of humanism I have seen.  Shaka and the walls fell!

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