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Switch to Forum Live View "It Only Takes a Girl"
3 years ago  ::  Dec 18, 2011 - 11:51AM #1
world citizen
Posts: 5,485

One of Beliefnet's rules is that the same post not be broadcast across the boards.  There is a video posted this morning in another board that, I'm very pleased to say, Beliefnet staff has decided merits attention across the boards.  Given the Faith's writings about the importance of education for ALL children, but especially girls as the first educators of each generation, this non-Baha'i video speaks directly to that issue:
It Only Takes a Girl

"Education holds an important place in the new order of things. The education of each child is compulsory. If there is not money enough in a family to educate both the girl and the boy the money must be dedicated to the girl's education, for she is the potential mother. If there are no parents the community must educate the child. In addition to this widespread education each child must be taught a profession, art, or trade, so that every member of the community will be enabled to earn his own livelihood. Work done in the spirit of service is the highest form of worship."  ~Abdu'l-Baha, Divine Philosophy, p. 83

.... those present should concern themselves with every means of training the girl children; with teaching the various branches of knowledge, good behaviour, a proper way of life, the cultivation of a good character, chastity and constancy, perseverance, strength, determination, firmness of purpose; with household management, the education of children, and whatever especially applieth to the needs of girls -- to the end that these girls, reared in the stronghold of all perfections, and with the protection of a goodly character, will, when they themselves become mothers, bring up their children from earliest infancy to have a good character and conduct themselves well.  Let them also study whatever will nurture the health of the body and its physical soundness, and how to guard their children from disease.  ~(Abdu'l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu'l-Baha, p. 123

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Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 24, 2011 - 4:53AM #2
Ibn
Posts: 4,819

Thank you world citizen. That was a good video.


My younger brother in Kashmir is a school teacher. He has joined other people in his community and created a Welfare Trust. The aim of the Trust is to help the poor people. One way of helping poor people is to make sure that no girl is kept at home just because the parents could not afford to buy her school uniform. In the past, some parents did keep their daughters at home just because of the uniform.


The Trust publishes a magazine every year with details of where they had spent the money. Active members of the Trust write their views in order to improve various aspects of their community. My brother is in charge of English section of the magazine. I believe he is going to emphasize the point that the girls are potential first educators of all the babies and children and, therefore, the future citizens in their community.


I like the requirement on parents in Baha'i faith to teach their children reading and writing. 


Thanks once again.


Ibn 

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 24, 2011 - 10:52AM #3
world citizen
Posts: 5,485

Dear friend Ibn ~


It is always good to hear from you and to have your input.  Your brother is to be highly commended for his involvment in such a worthy undertaking.  My daughter in Ghana has been taking some local children into her home to help them learn English and to study other subjects.  These are children who don't go to regular school because their parents cannot afford the tuition.  One must pay to go to school in Ghana... how sad is that? 

Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 24, 2011 - 2:11PM #4
Ironhold
Posts: 11,514

Dec 24, 2011 -- 10:52AM, world citizen wrote:

One must pay to go to school in Ghana... how sad is that? 




Random thought -


Does the Baha'I faith have any sort of educational program in place for such situations?



In the LDS faith, we have what's known as the Perpetual Education System. This provides no-interest loans for people in third-world countries to come to America and go to college. Having it be a loan makes it more palatable to people who aren't keen on taking charity, and having it be a no-interest loan means that they aren't under any pressure to pay it back.


In addition, the Church Educational System offers a home-school program maintained by Brigham Young University, but I'd have to check and see if it's available world-wide right now (I don't like the local school districts, and so if I do have kids then home-schooling would be a consideration).

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 24, 2011 - 3:24PM #5
Ibn
Posts: 4,819

Dear world citizen,


Yes, it is very sad but we need to understand that some countries are so poor that the people running the countries have no money to pay all the teachers in state schools. The education budgets come out of the tax revenue. In these countries, there isn't enough tax being paid because too many people are poor.


And if a country was a little above the poor level, there would be serious problems like corruption. In such countries, you can get nothing done witout paying bribe. The latter kind are countries like Pakistan where a third class teacher may get the job but a highly qualified and honest teacher may be refused the same job.


Then we have a problem of education not being compulsory in many countries for any age children. In those countries, it is the parents who decide whether their children should go to school or not. If those parents are not educated, they simply have no idea how important it is for their children to be educated. Even if they do send them to school initially, they are not going to care much if their child starts missing the school or even stop going to school. There are generations being produced like that in countries like Afghanistan and in poor areas of Pakistan as well as in African countries. This has become their culture and they have no education to change such a culture


Yes, it is sad but it is even more sad when I see that rich countries like Saudi Arabia are not doing much to help their poor citizens get education or countries like USA is more interested in bringing democracy in countries like Afghanistan before educating them what democracy really is and how to run it properly. Therefore, people in those countries need education first and the democracy second. It is impossible to run a democracy in a country where more than two third of population is not educated.


It is so sad in case of many Muslim majority countries because emphasis of the very first five verses revealed (96:1-5) to prophet Muhammad on Mount of Light (Jabal-e-Nur) is on reading, pen and teaching.


It is also sad that powerful countries are telling us that they are helping citizens in countries like Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya by helping to bring democracy there when all they are doing is placing certain people in position of authority there so that they (powerful countries) benefit from such change in trade deals and profits from other secret trade like drugs and WMDs.


The real human need in poor countries today is not democracy but culture change and education before democracy can work there.


Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.
Nelson Mandela


Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.
George Washington Carver


Learning is the beginning of wealth. Learning is the beginning of health. Learning is the beginning of spirituality. Searching and learning is where the miracle process all begins.
Jim Rohn   

I know one thing: There are a billion Islamic people in the world today, and there will be about 2 billion by the time we're dead. They're not going to give up their religion.
(Chris Matthews)
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 25, 2011 - 1:01AM #6
Lilwabbit
Posts: 2,896

Howdy my good friend Ibn,


Dec 24, 2011 -- 3:24PM, Ibn wrote:


The real human need in poor countries today is not democracy but culture change and education before democracy can work there.



How very true. In the case of Afghanistan, I have had to testify to the truth of your statement in practice.


Where "democratic" nation-states have been inherited by local populations as a result of a rapidly withdrawn colonial presence or authoritarian rule, democracy and national loyalty have never had an opportunity to properly evolve. Add the downright exploitation indulged by the formal or informal powerholders, and the civil conflicts ravaging the country, and you will have completely inoculated the local communities against the fragile central government. Afghanistan provides a case in point.


In the absence of healthy patriotism, a culture of democracy, a national infrastructure and strong national institutions, the social, economic and cultural activity is bound to remain predominantly local in character, steeped in received tradition and conceptions. For good and for ill. On the other hand, setting up powerful democratic institutions with haste before their "drivers" have developed a critical degree of national loyalty and solidarity defeats its own purpose, namely the object of state-building. Yet ironically this represents the avenue trodden by the international community in Afghanistan. A gradual yet firm process of learning and education is paramount before shoving a country with "Western-style" institutions. Only an idiot would let a kid drive a car. Yet, this is exactly the kind of idiocy practiced by rich countries in development cooperation the world over, including Afghanistan.


While national institution-building, large-scale public investment and extensive service-delivery by the central government remain some of the key objectives of development cooperation, experience has time and again shown the problems that arise if such complex institutions and investments take place before the society, as a whole, is sufficiently skilled and motivated to take on such vast responsibilities.


To cite an example, if the supreme loyalty of an average Afghan has for centuries resided in one's own ethnic group, tribe, family or friend, how can it be expected that the Afghans be prepared overnight, in the historical scheme of things, to run a nation-state without endemic nepotism and cronyism. If violence or the threat thereof has for three decades represented the most common, if not the sole, means for settling political, ethnic, economic or ideological differences, is it a wonder that a culture of democracy and consultation cannot come about in any near future. If devotion to the interest of small constituencies has dominated the passions of Afghan leaders for millennia, how can the donor community expect a culture of good governance to emerge any time soon, with its appurtenant dedication to common good and over-arching regard for the interest of the whole. Is it fair to expect Afghan leaders to regard themselves as the humble servants of the people when received values from the time immemorial have taught the ethic of people being the humble servants of their leaders.


The culture of nationhood must first be built, and only subsequently the establishment of powerful national institutions seriously ventured. A culture of nationhood, in turn, implies that the masses are vested with the capacity as well as the motivation to run a nation-state with all its attendant institutions and functions. The most sustainable and empowering way to create a culture of nationhood among the masses is by practicing first with the simpler functions of the village community and, through the village setting, addressing the rank and file of the Afghan population. The National Solidarity Programme and microcredit schemes provide a valuable, although by themselves insufficient, nudge towards these ends in Afghanistan.



Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.
Nelson Mandela


Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.
George Washington Carver


Learning is the beginning of wealth. Learning is the beginning of health. Learning is the beginning of spirituality. Searching and learning is where the miracle process all begins.
Jim Rohn   





Man is the supreme Talisman. Lack of a proper education hath, however, deprived him of that which he doth inherently possess. Through a word proceeding out of the mouth of God he was called into being; by one word more he was guided to recognize the Source of his education; by yet another word his station and destiny were safeguarded. The Great Being saith: Regard man as a mine rich in gems of inestimable value. Education can, alone, cause it to reveal its treasures, and enable mankind to benefit therefrom. (Bahá'u'lláh, Lawh-i-Maqsúd, par. 2)


With kind regards,


LilWabbit

"All things have I willed for you, and you too, for your own sake."
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 25, 2011 - 1:27PM #7
world citizen
Posts: 5,485

Dec 24, 2011 -- 2:11PM, Ironhold wrote:

Dec 24, 2011 -- 10:52AM, world citizen wrote:

One must pay to go to school in Ghana... how sad is that? 




Random thought -


Does the Baha'I faith have any sort of educational program in place for such situations?



In the LDS faith, we have what's known as the Perpetual Education System. This provides no-interest loans for people in third-world countries to come to America and go to college. Having it be a loan makes it more palatable to people who aren't keen on taking charity, and having it be a no-interest loan means that they aren't under any pressure to pay it back.


In addition, the Church Educational System offers a home-school program maintained by Brigham Young University, but I'd have to check and see if it's available world-wide right now (I don't like the local school districts, and so if I do have kids then home-schooling would be a consideration).


Hello Ironhold ~


Hoping your Christmas was blessed and joyful...


At this point in time the Faith has some regional schools in place but they aren't in the nature of the public school system you're familiar with.  It's projected that, in the future, there will be hospitals, universities, etc., but that isn't where concentration is for the present. 


In third world countries, it is up to individuals/groups of Baha'is as to how to begin the early training of local children in the manner best befitting the local needs and/or resources.  Unlike Christian missionaries who receive stipends (and possibly supplies) from the church, Baha'i 'pioneers' do so selflessly, relying upon income from locally obtained employment.  I mentioned my daughter in Ghana in another post who holds classes at home.  On her family's occasional visits Stateside, they load up with supplies that are either non-existent or too costly to obtain in Africa - erasers, chalk, Bic pens, etc. - the simple things so taken for granted in the West.


Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 26, 2011 - 2:39AM #8
Ironhold
Posts: 11,514

Dec 25, 2011 -- 1:27PM, world citizen wrote:

Dec 24, 2011 -- 2:11PM, Ironhold wrote:


Dec 24, 2011 -- 10:52AM, world citizen wrote:

One must pay to go to school in Ghana... how sad is that? 




Random thought -


Does the Baha'I faith have any sort of educational program in place for such situations?



In the LDS faith, we have what's known as the Perpetual Education System. This provides no-interest loans for people in third-world countries to come to America and go to college. Having it be a loan makes it more palatable to people who aren't keen on taking charity, and having it be a no-interest loan means that they aren't under any pressure to pay it back.


In addition, the Church Educational System offers a home-school program maintained by Brigham Young University, but I'd have to check and see if it's available world-wide right now (I don't like the local school districts, and so if I do have kids then home-schooling would be a consideration).




Hello Ironhold ~


Hoping your Christmas was blessed and joyful...


At this point in time the Faith has some regional schools in place but they aren't in the nature of the public school system you're familiar with.  It's projected that, in the future, there will be hospitals, universities, etc., but that isn't where concentration is for the present. 


In third world countries, it is up to individuals/groups of Baha'is as to how to begin the early training of local children in the manner best befitting the local needs and/or resources.  Unlike Christian missionaries who receive stipends (and possibly supplies) from the church, Baha'i 'pioneers' do so selflessly, relying upon income from locally obtained employment.  I mentioned my daughter in Ghana in another post who holds classes at home.  On her family's occasional visits Stateside, they load up with supplies that are either non-existent or too costly to obtain in Africa - erasers, chalk, Bic pens, etc. - the simple things so taken for granted in the West.





Thanks.

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