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Switch to Forum Live View The Buddha's Law of Wisdom - The Buddha Dharma
3 years ago  ::  Dec 06, 2011 - 5:39PM #11
etoro
Posts: 572

Dec 6, 2011 -- 2:13PM, nnn123 wrote:


Roshi Phillip Kapleau said "long meditation produces great insight."



Just like with the writer, that the answers come from sitting onself down and writing...


so too, in Buddhism the answers come from the practice itself, --- of meditation, right action (moral disciplines) and etc.



to my mind Dharma is the spiritual law.  It includes morality as well as discussion of the underlying principles of the world --- that, karma exists and we are repaid for every good and bad action that we do.





Your comments are well received.

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2 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2012 - 8:27PM #12
etoro
Posts: 572

This was an interesting thread.  Yet I suspect very difficult for people to contemplate.  The Buddha's wisdom remains quite a mystery to many.  Yet, the important thing to bear in mind is that the Buddha Dharma is the inexhaustable truth of the true nature of reality as it concerns the nature and functions of our lives and the symbiotic relationship between our lives, all life and the environment which supports it. It is a universal law better known as myoho renge kyo - Mystic law of Cause and Effect.  


Many people have difficulty understanding how Buddhism or true Buddha wisdom and its attendent practices of observation, cultivation and application can manifest from cultures outside of India. Yet a careful study of the history of Buddhism and its transmission across human cultures demonstrates that the Buddhist philosophy we know of today actually had many great contributors who developed its principles by organizing the various sutras into broad categories and principles such the hearer vehicle, the bodhisattva vehicle, the true word vehicle and the single Buddha vehicle, etc. and made them applicable to the times in which they lived as well as enabled the wisdom of Buddhism to be well organized, transmitted and applied to many diffirent cultures and circumstances. This is because the underlying principles and reasoning of the Buddha are the universal laws which govern all life.


Across Asian history, Buddhism was transmitted to the many great countries of Asia and within these countries its principles were debated by many great and highly disciplined scholars who held the teachings of Buddhism in great reverence and esteem. Many of these debates were official events which were sanctioned before the Emperors of the country in China, japan, Korea, Tibet, Mongolia and so forth. These debates bore great significance in terms of establishing public policies, and in regard to theories of fairness, justice, life philosophy which lead to the developments and principles of democratic and just governments and the development of peace and justice in these societies. Within these debates the issue of which of the Buddha's teachings was of greater authority and wisdom bore great significance in determining which teachings to be observed and applied broadly.  In this respect the Lotus Sutra won out as the Buddha's teaching with the highest moral authority and the one which proclaimed the universal treasure of Buddhahood reciding in the life of all people thereby making all people worthy of the highet honor and respect. In one great debator, Saicho or Dengyo of Japan, founder of the Japanese Tien Tai Lotus school he states, 


"If passages of proof are quoted from the sutras or treatises, it should be made clear whether they are quoted from the provisional teachings or the true teaching, from Mahayana or Hinayana works, from partial teachings or the perfect teaching, from half revelations or from the full revelation."  - An Essay on the Protection of the Nation, by Dengyo Daishi c 798ad - Japan


Here it is important to note that the term "full revelation" indicates the transmission of the direct Buddha vehicle, the Sad Dharma of the Buddha, the wisdom that the Buddha wished to convey at the dawn of his awakening but refrained from doing so because of the concerns that I posted at the beginning of this dialogue.  The post I provide offers the issues that the Buddha grappled with at the beginning of his preaching career, the  Buddha's perception of the conditions of the people at the start of his preaching career and his accomplishment in training them to understand the "full revelation" near the end of his life. In distiinguishing the "full revelation", (i.e., the Lotus Sutra) of the Buddha from the partial revelations, the accomplsihments of the great Buddhist Chinese scholar Tien Tai Chi hi are well recognized in having completed a compendium of doctrines which organizes the Buddha Dharma into its component parts, illustrating the subtle contrasts between the various forms of teaching expedients and the distinctions between conditional expedient meanings and the more exceedingly subtle universal truths embeded within them as well as the manner in which the universal principles are drawn out and separated onto teachings which stand for the most universal principles. 


As a side note I should mention that this full revelation as expounded by the great teacher Tien Tai is not directly appreciated in the schools of Tibetan Buddhism due in part to the long standing conflicts between the Chinese and Tibetan governments not to mention the fine distinctions the Tien Tai school drew concerning the prajna paramita in theory versus the actual prajna paramita in the form of the Buddha's "true words".  Yet I also believe, on the basis of many points of evidence that Tien Tai Buddhism was transmitted back to India and to Nalanda Monestary in the 6th and 7th centuries and that the views of the Tien Tai school are absorbed and diffused within the teachings of Indian esoteric (mantrayana) Buddhism of the later centuries.


More to the point the most subtle and profound distinctions made within the Buddhist philosophy concern the distinctions that have been drawn between the Lotus Sutra of the Tien Tai and even more important Nichiren school (because of its now ease of entry and proof based universal applicability) versus the esoteric (secret mantra ) principles that had evolved through the amalgam of Buddhism, and shaivism as observed through the convergences of the Madhyamaka of Nagarjuna and his spiritual followers and the Yogacharra of Maitreya - Asanga - Vasubandhu and their spiritual disciples and the esoteric mantra yoga of Mahavairochana transmitted by scholastic developments and observed at Nalanda by the Chinese pilgrim Tsuan Tsang in his "Record of the Western Region", the pilgrimage of the esoteric Indian sages who journeyed to China and brought the esoteric Mantrayana, Shubakarahimsa, Amoghavajra as well as the historic teachings of writings of the 6th patriarch of the Tien Tai School, Ching Hsi Chang Jan (Miao-Lo).    Indeed one can observe many similarities and points of convergence between all of the Mahanyana and Vajrayana schools of thought.  Nichiren was indeed the person in the best position in later times to draw these points of convergence back to he main issue of enabling all people to attain the Buddha wisdom within their own lifetimes. This point, while drawing forth great contraversy, is in fact the main point of it all.  This is because it reflectes the work of great Bodhisattva's who sought to open the wisdom and state of life of the Buddha available to all people everywhere. 





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