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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2011 - 6:36PM #1
Yavanna
Posts: 3,149
Would anyone else like to see this phrase hurled into the sun? It's bad enough that the Evangelicals use it for their culture war and wouldn't know Judaism from the Force, but I've noticed secular sources use it too, broadly attacking all religion and lumping Judaism into the grouping of Islam and Christianity.

I swear, the term makes me want to scream.
The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gloaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.
- J.R.R. Tolkien
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2011 - 9:07PM #2
ffb
Posts: 2,259

I have never liked the phrase. Though there is a useful conenction between the "Abrahamic" faiths, there is so much that divides Judaism and Christianity (and Islam) that the simple minded linkage is more destructive than helpful.

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 02, 2011 - 12:10AM #3
Yavanna
Posts: 3,149

Oct 1, 2011 -- 9:07PM, ffb wrote:


I have never liked the phrase. Though there is a useful conenction between the "Abrahamic" faiths, there is so much that divides Judaism and Christianity (and Islam) that the simple minded linkage is more destructive than helpful.





Precisely. The belief that we have "This" in common leads people to believe we have "that" in common and the assumptions fall down their slippery slope until no one learns anything. In the end, mindless propaganda starts to damn us because people "know" what Judaism teaches.

The dwarves of yore made mighty spells,
While hammers fell like ringing bells
In places deep, where dark things sleep,
In hollow halls beneath the fells.

For ancient king and elvish lord
There many a gloaming golden hoard
They shaped and wrought, and light they caught
To hide in gems on hilt of sword.
- J.R.R. Tolkien
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3 years ago  ::  Oct 05, 2011 - 1:21PM #4
Bunsinspace
Posts: 5,931

BS"D


It grates on me like every other oxymoron such as Military Intelligence, Governmental Efficiency, Religious Rationalism, Pious Indignation, American Freedom, Charitable Contributions, ad nauseum.  George Orwell would have been proud to use such a term in one of his dystopian works IMHO.

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 05, 2011 - 1:28PM #5
Bunsinspace
Posts: 5,931

Oct 1, 2011 -- 9:07PM, ffb wrote:


I have never liked the phrase. Though there is a useful conenction between the "Abrahamic" faiths, there is so much that divides Judaism and Christianity (and Islam) that the simple minded linkage is more destructive than helpful.





BS"D


For some reason I have never been able to find a real and direct link between the faiths of Abraham and the faiths of Ibrahim except in the imagination of someone who is practicing neither.  But in the ramblings of occultism there is a solid connection, for what it's worth.  That is the only place I could find it consistently.   Might as well posit a connection between infra-red and burnt-umber for all the good it does.  Better IMHO because such a connection does no real harm.

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 05, 2011 - 5:51PM #6
LeahOne
Posts: 16,586

Count me in on the farewell celebration!!!  HATE it, absolutely.....useless and worthless 'description'. 

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3 years ago  ::  Jan 04, 2012 - 4:44PM #7
NotAnAtheistMama
Posts: 58

When you see "Judeo-Christian" used in an academic capacity (and I've never seen it used any other way), it generally means things which are Jewish which Christians also do.


For instance, American law is Judeo-Christian. If you trace the evolution of American law back through English law, you will eventually hit the Church, and then you will eventually go all the way back to Judaism. Double-jeopardy? Jewish. No testimony to be extracted by torture? Jewish. Right against self-incrimination? Jewish. (BTW, the book "Where Judaism Differs" by Abba Hillel Silver discusses the differences between Judaism and Greco-Roman paganism and, to a lesser extent, the differences between Judaism and the other two monotheistic faiths.)


See, I did the same thing in a different context: Greco-Roman. Because Greece and Roman often overlapped in religion and law and philosophy (Rome built on a lot of Greek principals), when you're discussing something which is applicable to both, you refer to it as Greco-Roman. The same thing is true of Judeo-Christian.

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