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3 years ago  ::  Sep 01, 2011 - 9:40PM #1
Bob0
Posts: 485
www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=46,1...


Can you read this article without attachment? 
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 28, 2011 - 11:01PM #2
Larosser
Posts: 413

A poem by Thich Nhat Hanh:


allspirit.co.uk/names.html

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 21, 2011 - 1:56PM #3
etoro
Posts: 574

The philosophy of Budddhism has brought forth and has cultivated many insights focusing in on the nature and true reality of living beings. Buddhism reveals that living beings are an expression of an eternal continuum that arises and ceases throughout eternity. This continuum is reflected more through the inner sphere where the process of thought can reflect upon more  and greater attributes of reality than can be observed through the other sense organs within brief (physical) periods of time.  Yet even the physical material reality as seen through the sense powers of scientific instruments, when dividing up reality between its bigger and smaller interacting parts observe a huge range of events going on within milliseconds of each other among minute component particles.  With data from microscopes and telescopes one can literally observe the workings of the vast universe within a grain of sand.


The Buddha regarded all expresssions of life and reality as mystic in nature.  This mystic attribute derives from the unbroken chain of causation stemming from the infinite past on to the eternal future all binded together within each life moment as the simultaneity of cause and effect. Both the future and the past are contained in the present moment.  Therefore all of the attribites of reality are contained within a single life moment. The universe of space and time is a single interconnected continuum where each part supports and contributes to all other parts. This insight into reality also figures prominently when we are contemplating the cause and effect of attachments, or the interdependency which gives rise to the dualistic states Buddhism calls the illusion of the self nature.


Buddhism teaches that all atttributes of self nature are dualistic. In other words as the Buddha describes in the second chapter of the Lotus Sutra, all phenomena which make appearance as consciousness or a single thought moment through contact with the sense organs possess the ten factors of causes and conditions. The Buddha began this analysis by explaining that all reality as percieved by living beings occurs within the eighteen spheres of activitity.  These are the sense organs or media, the sense objects (attributes of contact) and the thought impressions that are produced by the mind.  This consists of the inner thought representation and the nomenclature or noun.that is associated with the impression. Early Buddhist engaged in painstaking expositions of all data which make up the life moment and compiled them into systems of thought known as abhidharma. These compilations of systems explicating the reality of a single thought were then used as the basis for all subsequent discussion and analysis of the process (the substance) of the inner experience of living beings. The manifested states of experience have been divided into ten broad categories beginning with the experience of suffering known as hellish suffering up through the greatest experience in life named Buddhahood itself or the state of life enjoyed by a fully enlightened being.  All states of experience derive from the interaction between self and the environment. The more knowledge that one can acquire over the eighteen elements  which produce the experience of reality, the states of life, the more enlightenment, power and control one can bring to the present moment of ones own life experiences. In this way one can become a master of their own life and mind rather than allow the natural processes of life mindlesslly dictate the nature of ones experience. The point here is that attachment in and of itself is not the cause of the problem perse but rather the quality of the experience one is having while engaging with the susbtances of reality. The quality of ones experience is known in Buddhism as "karmic outflows". 


Some among the early schools of Buddhism intererpreted the Buddhas ideas wihin the context of the prevalent beliefs of the time like Brahmanism and Vedanta and thought that the Buddha meant that one must completely severe ones connection with physical reality itself.  This view and several others led to profound debates about the true meaning of the Buddha's awakened state and what this state truly entailed. This led to many flourishments of phiosophical intepretation of what the Buddha thought and disagreements which in turn gave rise to both contraversy and divisions among groups of followers led by outspoken leaders.  These debates centered around the attributes of the 18 elements of senses which give rise to experience, the inborn contacts between sense organs, sense objects, sense consciousnesses, and the attributes and qualities of all these phenomena. Since the Buddha spoke of a state of experience that he had awakened too known as nirvana the greatest speculation of meaning centered around this mind state known as Nirvana. Distinctions were drawn between the Buddha's independently derived nirvana versus the kind and qualities of  nirvana acquired by disciples through learning from the Buddha. Great philosophical principles regarding the causes and nature of life experience across vast stretches of time over numerous were developed and teased out through these discussions and debates. The basis for such elaborate thought processes stemmed from the fact that broad generalizations of patterns of life activity were established and categorized as patterns of activity that were universally carried out repeatedly by living beings lifetime after lifetime. These establishments of ever deeper insightful principles gave rise to an even deeper class of texts known as the Mahayana texts of tenets and principles of Buddha wisdom.  These discinctions were then classified into greater and lesser schools of Buddha wisdom and insight into the true nature of phenomena.


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3 years ago  ::  Nov 26, 2011 - 6:10AM #4
Ferretling
Posts: 254

Sep 1, 2011 -- 9:40PM, Bob0 wrote:

www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=46,1...


Can you read this article without attachment? 




In short, no. I cried.


In more detailed answer-- still processing.

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2011 - 3:42PM #5
etoro
Posts: 574

The explainations in post number three above are provided in order to provide insight into the cognitive processes which are contemplated in Buddhism as we consider the causes and effects of attachment aka the interactions between life (the subject) and the environment (the object). As one devles deeper into the question of the causes and effects of atttachment the object of contemplation turns from objects in the outer environment to the nature of the impressions retained in ones own mind itself. This in turn leads to a questioning and analysis of the true nature of ones own mind and one's Life itself. In other words the nature of the subject becomes the object of contemplation. Hence there is the grand debates which center upon the principle of the emptiness of all phenomena, the true nature of reality, and questions regarding the true aspect of the Buddha's enlightenment or nirvana. Such debates in turn led to the development of various schools of thought within Buddhism.  These distinctions began within the first 18 subdivisions of the Buddhist community on the basis of the development of the abhidharma or great expositions on the true meaning of the words of the Buddha. The goal of the abhidharma is to elucidate on the true nature of all phenomena or dharmas and ultimately on the true elements or basic constituents of all attributes. These contemplations and analysis were considered the pathways to true enlightenment and the pathways to true freedom from the sources of suffering.  As various groups debated on the true nature of all dharmas they sought to understand the original causes of life suffering and the way to the elimination of the cause of suffering aka the true meaning of the four noble truths. In all cases what is being considered are perceptions of self and reality and the experience that is attended by those perceptions. This lead to the principles or sets of tenets of the four main Indian schools of Buddhism, namely, the great exposition school, the sutra only school, the consciousness only school and the middleway school. Each of these schools in turn developed subdivisions within them.    

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