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Switch to Forum Live View Simply Beautiful....no matter what faith
4 years ago  ::  Apr 11, 2011 - 8:36PM #1
Brooke
Posts: 22
I received this as an email and found it so incredibly beautiful that I had to share. The words are thought provoking and inspirational. The music is calm and soothing. The photos made me cry at the beauty of the world in which we live. I hope you enjoy this.
Brooke

www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEXlnAeu_fg
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2012 - 9:50PM #2
christine3
Posts: 9,196

Hi, is there anybody here?

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 13, 2012 - 11:18PM #3
Ferretling
Posts: 259

Mar 11, 2012 -- 9:50PM, christine3 wrote:


Hi, is there anybody here?




Yes?

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 14, 2012 - 12:23AM #4
christine3
Posts: 9,196

Mar 13, 2012 -- 11:18PM, Ferretling wrote:


Mar 11, 2012 -- 9:50PM, christine3 wrote:


Hi, is there anybody here?




Yes?





Hi, I am a refugee from the other Buddhist thread. I can't go there and talk about Buddhism. I was hoping to find somebody to ask a few questions. My problem right now is that I have trouble meditating.  Perhaps I'm not doing it right.  The Nam Myoho Renge Kyo (or however it is spelled) makes me tired.  Any suggestions?

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 14, 2012 - 2:24AM #5
Ferretling
Posts: 259

Well, first off, I will say that "doing it right" isn't exactly what you want to be focusing on. That said, if you find it tiring, perhaps a different meditation practice is in order.


Not all Buddhist meditation is the same. Some chant, some are silent, some sit one way, some another, some walk...


My temple is Soto Zen, and we do two types of meditation: zazen and kinhin. The first is silent sitting meditation, and the other is silent walking meditation. The seated is the one we devote more time to. We sit facing the wall on cushions (or in a chair for those of us with major knee issues) and we sit silently and alertly. That might work for you, and you can start off in short increments.


I would look into different types of meditation and see what works for you, to be honest. Some Buddhist temples offer meditation practice for beginners or have beginner classes. Some civic and cultural centers also sometimes offer meditation from various traditions (not all Buddhist). You could look into those. There are also books and CDs on meditation; I have found Pema Chodron and Thich Nhat Hanh's works to be helpful, for example. I have a copy of "The Blooming of a Lotus" by Thich Nhat Hanh that has some very useful yet simple meditation exercises that you might want to try.


In the end, my advice is this: find a type of meditation that works for you. Start out incrementally, at least at home. Meditate regularly. (It is a discipline of the mind, after all.) Find a group to meditate with on a reasonably regular basis. Meditation is easier if you have a community.



Above all, while you are disciplining the mind, remember to treat yourself with compassion. Meditation is not as easy as it seems it ought to be. Have patience with yourself, and with the meditation.


Good luck.

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3 years ago  ::  Mar 22, 2012 - 8:17AM #6
christine3
Posts: 9,196

Mar 14, 2012 -- 2:24AM, Ferretling wrote:


Well, first off, I will say that "doing it right" isn't exactly what you want to be focusing on. That said, if you find it tiring, perhaps a different meditation practice is in order.


Not all Buddhist meditation is the same. Some chant, some are silent, some sit one way, some another, some walk...


My temple is Soto Zen, and we do two types of meditation: zazen and kinhin. The first is silent sitting meditation, and the other is silent walking meditation. The seated is the one we devote more time to. We sit facing the wall on cushions (or in a chair for those of us with major knee issues) and we sit silently and alertly. That might work for you, and you can start off in short increments.


I would look into different types of meditation and see what works for you, to be honest. Some Buddhist temples offer meditation practice for beginners or have beginner classes. Some civic and cultural centers also sometimes offer meditation from various traditions (not all Buddhist). You could look into those. There are also books and CDs on meditation; I have found Pema Chodron and Thich Nhat Hanh's works to be helpful, for example. I have a copy of "The Blooming of a Lotus" by Thich Nhat Hanh that has some very useful yet simple meditation exercises that you might want to try.


In the end, my advice is this: find a type of meditation that works for you. Start out incrementally, at least at home. Meditate regularly. (It is a discipline of the mind, after all.) Find a group to meditate with on a reasonably regular basis. Meditation is easier if you have a community.



Above all, while you are disciplining the mind, remember to treat yourself with compassion. Meditation is not as easy as it seems it ought to be. Have patience with yourself, and with the meditation.


Good luck.




Thanks.

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1 month ago  ::  Aug 05, 2015 - 2:59AM #7
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 954

Mar 14, 2012 -- 12:23AM, christine3 wrote:


Mar 13, 2012 -- 11:18PM, Ferretling wrote:


Mar 11, 2012 -- 9:50PM, christine3 wrote:


Hi, is there anybody here?




Yes?





Hi, I am a refugee from the other Buddhist thread. I can't go there and talk about Buddhism. I was hoping to find somebody to ask a few questions. My problem right now is that I have trouble meditating.  Perhaps I'm not doing it right.  The Nam Myoho Renge Kyo (or however it is spelled) makes me tired.  Any suggestions?




When one recites a mantra, one ought to firstly develop the motivation for recitation. The purpose of practising any Buddhist Mantra is to develop Bodhicitta, the Mind of Enlightenment which is grounded in [Selfless] Compassion.


Buddhahood is experienced as a simultaneous realisation and attainment of Transcendental Wisdom [Prajna], and Compassion [Karuna].


'Nam Myoho Renge Kyo' is a Mantra used in Mahayana Buddhism, for invoking the Lotus Sutra as the Deity, aka as Buddha-Wisdom, usually called Buddhahood. Buddhahood is supramundane and beyond birth and death. So it is not surprising that one may encounter hindrances along the way. Sleepiness blinds our mental vision and leads to aversion and dissipation of consciousness.


These practices may help one to ward off sleepiness:


1  Metta Meditation


2  Walking Meditation


3  Suryanamaskara,


4  Tibetan Shinay Meditation,


5  Theravadin Buddhist Samatha Meditation.


All of these meditation practices will develop the mind for absorption into higher states of consciousness, in which sleepiness is automatically warded off.


But the Mantra Yoga practice of reciting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo ought to bestow the same fruitions as the above practices. So it may be pertinent to find a qualified Buddhist Preceptor. Qualification ought to have arisen from practice and not form one who has read a lot of books.


But the second factor of hte eightfold Noble Path gives us a more pointed piece of advice:


Right Intention, aka Sankalpa [Sanskrit].


'May I recite the Mantra 'Nam Myoho Renge Kyo'.


And to begin with, do not recite the Mantra too many times as this is leads to mental sleepiness. Whilst 108 tines per session is admirable, we can achieve the same result with just 9 recitations per session, with a well-pointed Sankalpa. and we just need patience. It takes time to establish oneself in Mantra Yoga Practice. Sometimes we recite and feel great and think that we have achieved something, at other times we feel lousy and think we have wasted our time. Just recite and pay no attention to achievements. Over time, the true fruitions of Mantra Yoga will arise.



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