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3 years ago  ::  Apr 03, 2011 - 9:31PM #31
Namchuck
Posts: 10,821

Apr 3, 2011 -- 8:20PM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 3, 2011 -- 7:21PM, Namchuck wrote:

While, probably like you, I have never felt superior to those who believe in gods, it seems to me that people do so only in order to avoid looking reality in the face, especially the reality of their own eventual extinction.


I don't feel superior to Christians - at least the majority of them anyway.  I see the problem in two ways; one, they don't want to face their own mortality which is probably one of the main reasons god beliefs started. Two, they want to be part of the herd. Humans do have a very strong herd/pack instinct. That's probably what keeps religion going.


It seems man's refusal to see the obvious, his longing for a better deal even if it is based on pure fiction has no limits.


If they see the obvious, and admit it, then they can't be part of the herd anymore. Some are so brainwashed from childhood that it's not possible for them to conceive of a godless Universe.




I probably articulated that incorrectly. I didn't mean to imply that you did regard yourself superior to those who believe in gods, but, rather, like me, you didn't.


I think you've nailed the salient reasons why most believe in gods.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 03, 2011 - 10:02PM #32
mountain_man
Posts: 38,097

Apr 3, 2011 -- 9:31PM, Namchuck wrote:

I probably articulated that incorrectly. I didn't mean to imply that you did regard yourself superior to those who believe in gods, but, rather, like me, you didn't.


You articulated it just fine. I was agreeing with you. Sometimes I do come across as seeming to feel superior to christians, and other believers, but that's just this cold form of media we are using. I don't feel superior to, for example, Fred Phelps. I do feel pity for him and he's a good example of someone with a religious addiction.


I think you've nailed the salient reasons why most believe in gods.


I've been fascinated in the psychological reasons behind why people believe things. Religious beliefs seem to be a survival mechanism gone awry.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 03, 2011 - 11:29PM #33
Namchuck
Posts: 10,821

Apr 3, 2011 -- 10:02PM, mountain_man wrote:


Apr 3, 2011 -- 9:31PM, Namchuck wrote:

I probably articulated that incorrectly. I didn't mean to imply that you did regard yourself superior to those who believe in gods, but, rather, like me, you didn't.


You articulated it just fine. I was agreeing with you. Sometimes I do come across as seeming to feel superior to christians, and other believers, but that's just this cold form of media we are using. I don't feel superior to, for example, Fred Phelps. I do feel pity for him and he's a good example of someone with a religious addiction.


I think you've nailed the salient reasons why most believe in gods.


I've been fascinated in the psychological reasons behind why people believe things. Religious beliefs seem to be a survival mechanism gone awry.




 


I'm somewhat persuaded by David Sloan Wilson's evolutionary take on it. 


Worth checking out.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2011 - 7:54AM #34
ctcss
Posts: 671

Apr 2, 2011 -- 10:33AM, Wiscidea wrote:

I still don't get the hyphen instead of the "o". The intent is obvious ... if someone is going to be offended, the hyphen certainly doesn't matter. And if there were I god, I'm confident it would see through the ruse.



Not meaning to barge in here, but just for information's sake, the term "G_d" or "G-d", as far as I know, is something that Jewish believers often will use when writing about God. They do it for the very specific religious purpose of not defacing God's name. Specifically, they are concerned about the possibility of someone printing out the text and possibly, accidently, using that text to line a birdcage, wrap fish, clean up a mess, etc, thus defacing or disrespecting God's name. (I think when disposing of worn out religious texts they are supposed to respectfully bury them or burn them. In the US, we are supposed to burn old US flags, not trash them, so this type of thinking is not just restricted to religion.)


Yes, it's a bit of overkill for internet posts, and many deep Jewish thinkers will point out that "God" isn't even God's name (it needs to be in Hebrew, I think), thus there is no ritualistic danger in spelling out the English word "God". Still, one sees it on a lot of boards and if the poster is not Jewish, they may have just picked up the usage from a Jewish board and thought it was simply a polite, PC way of referring to God.


I apologize to any Jewish atheists here who read this if I have gotten something wrong in my explanation.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2011 - 10:03AM #35
farragut
Posts: 3,910

From my experience growing up in a somewhat irreverent society, Gd was usually used as shorthand for the expletive Goddamn or the adjective term God damned. As a result, that is normally my first response at seeing Gd.  I doubt that I am alone.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2011 - 10:56AM #36
mountain_man
Posts: 38,097

It all goes back to the ancient belief that the name of a god had special powers. That's why many religions, the ancient Hebrews included, never used the real name of their god.

Dave - Just a Man in the Mountains.

I am a Humanist. I believe in a rational philosophy of life, informed by science, inspired by art, and motivated by a desire to do good for its own sake and not by an expectation of a reward or fear of punishment in an afterlife.
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