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Switch to Forum Live View Jesus in New Thought
4 years ago  ::  Aug 22, 2010 - 2:43PM #1
Wendy64
Posts: 1

How does Jesus work in New Thought? I admit I haven't read alot about it yet, but I am intrigued by some of the ideas I have read, but I didn't see Jesus mentioned yet, so I am wondering if you can retain your basic Christian beliefs while also embracing these new ideas? 

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4 years ago  ::  Aug 24, 2010 - 1:05AM #2
Revjohn
Posts: 167

Warm Greetings, All,


New Thought certainly emerged from Christian roots, and New Testament scriptures feature prominently in the writings of many (though not all) of the key figures in the New Thought movement.  However, the traditional Christian emphasis on the Crucifixion and the Resurrection as saving us from sin is not central to New Thought, as it tends to be in traditional Christian thought.  Rather, the emphasis is on Jesus as a teacher and as a living example to be emulated, rather than as an incarnation of God to be worshipped.  The New Thought position tends to be that Jesus of Nazareth was indeed the son of God, but as he himself taught, we all are children of God, and while he excelled at that in a way that most of us won't manage, it doesn't mean that this was, for him, a totally unique status.  For those involved in a formal New Thought church, such as Unity or Divine Science, such involvement generally takes the place of the more conventional Christian worship services.  For those of us who don't really have an opportunity to be part of such a group (for example, those of us in relatively remote and rural areas, where New Thought groups often cannot be found anywhere near), we may be involved in a mainstream Christian church, while also engaging in practices, study, and offering to others teachings that are more in line with New Thought. 


As for my personal experience, I have been involved, on and off, but more often on, with mainstream Christian churches for most of my life, and I continue this for now, even though New Thought (which, despite a lifelong interest in theology and metaphysics, I only really became acquainted with during the last three or four of my 57 years) has had a marked effect on my theological perspective, as well as offering a strong validation of ideas I have long held, but didn't know that there were others with such similar ideas.  Nonetheless, I remain an active member of a Christian church, even though I have been ordained a minister in a branch of New Thought.  I participate sincerely and mindfully in the services there, even though there are some things said in the liturgy with which I do not fully agree, and I have always found sharing a liturgy with a group of people to be an uplifting and fortifying experience.  I personally find most kinds of religious arguments to be poor form, and so I don't go out of my way to make my disagreements known or announce my own ordination, although whenever I do have a discussion with others, I try to express myself honestly.  I am, of course, involved in a fairly liberal denomination in which diverse views are tolerated, and I do in fact sport a "clergy" sticker on my car bumper, so it's not like I'm "keeping a secret."  I think most of the folks in this fairly small local church are well aware that there is something a little "different" about me!  Nonetheless I have always felt welcomed there. 


When I finish my doctoral studies, it is my intention to engage more fully in spiritual guidance, life coaching, and healing practices, and perhaps to try to establish some sort of regular local New Thought meeting.  When that time arises, I will make a decision as to whether to continue involvement with the church I currently attend, or any other, for that matter.  For now, I've kind of got a foot in both worlds, and I'm comfortable with that.  My spiritual interests are actually quite broad, and I have never believed that any one religion or group was in sole possession of "The Truth," and so I tend to be inclusive as much as possible, rather than exclusive.  I have no wish to "convert" others away from any faith they may have now, but rather wish to add to and broaden their perspective and practices so that they may learn additional ideas and ways of making contact with the God within themselves that will enable them to grow further along spiritual lines, and to have spiritual experiences that will enrich or possibly even dramatically change their lives, as my own encounter with God has changed mine. 


In Unity,


Rev. John


 

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4 years ago  ::  Oct 21, 2010 - 1:18PM #3
spiritheart
Posts: 122

Wendy....to me new thought is parallel to being able to 'think for oneself' to explore the intuitive mind (heart) as opposed to the human mind, (traditonal beliefs) or the head.   I am a big fan of Jesus and his teaching...and if one was to ask me who I relate to the most of all the world teachers down through the ages...I would say it was him, because his words really resonate with me....but I also acknowledge so many others..who's teachings are in many respects parallel to his own...and even some that were written centuries earlier than Christainity, even...  This book or web-site as it is now, is a great source to study these paralleles of most of the world's great religious teaching.


Thsi book was put together by religious scholars from many faiths so it is not a  single attempt by any one group to 'outshine' others, but rather to unify  (which of course is seen as a threat to some)  but not to many/most New Thought practicianers.   


www.unification.net/ws/


enjoy james


 

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2011 - 8:29PM #4
Puresoul
Posts: 43

Greetings of Peace To All,


 


  May I suggest that Edgar Cayce's readings gave one of the best confirmations about Jesus (Yeshu'a) within the context of New Thought.  Edgar Cayce distinguishes between "Jesus" and "Christhood".


 


  Jesus (Yeshu'a) was a soul, like us, who reincarnated through many lifetimes.  "Christhood" is something he was the first to allow to be manifest through his material life, and it is something which we also ought to aspire towards. 


 


  Edgar Cayce called Jesus our "Elder Brother"

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2011 - 8:12AM #5
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,366

Aug 24, 2010 -- 1:05AM, Revjohn wrote:


Warm Greetings, All,


New Thought certainly emerged from Christian roots, and New Testament scriptures feature prominently in the writings of many (though not all) of the key figures in the New Thought movement.  However, the traditional Christian emphasis on the Crucifixion and the Resurrection as saving us from sin is not central to New Thought, as it tends to be in traditional Christian thought.  Rather, the emphasis is on Jesus as a teacher and as a living example to be emulated, rather than as an incarnation of God to be worshipped.  The New Thought position tends to be that Jesus of Nazareth was indeed the son of God, but as he himself taught, we all are children of God, and while he excelled at that in a way that most of us won't manage, it doesn't mean that this was, for him, a totally unique status.  For those involved in a formal New Thought church, such as Unity or Divine Science, such involvement generally takes the place of the more conventional Christian worship services.  For those of us who don't really have an opportunity to be part of such a group (for example, those of us in relatively remote and rural areas, where New Thought groups often cannot be found anywhere near), we may be involved in a mainstream Christian church, while also engaging in practices, study, and offering to others teachings that are more in line with New Thought. 


As for my personal experience, I have been involved, on and off, but more often on, with mainstream Christian churches for most of my life, and I continue this for now, even though New Thought (which, despite a lifelong interest in theology and metaphysics, I only really became acquainted with during the last three or four of my 57 years) has had a marked effect on my theological perspective, as well as offering a strong validation of ideas I have long held, but didn't know that there were others with such similar ideas.  Nonetheless, I remain an active member of a Christian church, even though I have been ordained a minister in a branch of New Thought.  I participate sincerely and mindfully in the services there, even though there are some things said in the liturgy with which I do not fully agree, and I have always found sharing a liturgy with a group of people to be an uplifting and fortifying experience.  I personally find most kinds of religious arguments to be poor form, and so I don't go out of my way to make my disagreements known or announce my own ordination, although whenever I do have a discussion with others, I try to express myself honestly.  I am, of course, involved in a fairly liberal denomination in which diverse views are tolerated, and I do in fact sport a "clergy" sticker on my car bumper, so it's not like I'm "keeping a secret."  I think most of the folks in this fairly small local church are well aware that there is something a little "different" about me!  Nonetheless I have always felt welcomed there. 


When I finish my doctoral studies, it is my intention to engage more fully in spiritual guidance, life coaching, and healing practices, and perhaps to try to establish some sort of regular local New Thought meeting.  When that time arises, I will make a decision as to whether to continue involvement with the church I currently attend, or any other, for that matter.  For now, I've kind of got a foot in both worlds, and I'm comfortable with that.  My spiritual interests are actually quite broad, and I have never believed that any one religion or group was in sole possession of "The Truth," and so I tend to be inclusive as much as possible, rather than exclusive.  I have no wish to "convert" others away from any faith they may have now, but rather wish to add to and broaden their perspective and practices so that they may learn additional ideas and ways of making contact with the God within themselves that will enable them to grow further along spiritual lines, and to have spiritual experiences that will enrich or possibly even dramatically change their lives, as my own encounter with God has changed mine. 


In Unity,


Rev. John


 




 


Rev John,


 


Just curious what liberal denomination  do you belong to?

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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4 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2011 - 8:23AM #6
Revjohn
Posts: 167

I attend services at an Episcopal church. 

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4 years ago  ::  Feb 18, 2011 - 11:11AM #7
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,366

Feb 18, 2011 -- 8:23AM, Revjohn wrote:


I attend services at an Episcopal church. 





 


That's Interesting I have of late been doing alot of reading regarding    New Thought  and i like a lot of it  But when i go to Church it's the   Episcopal Church which i feel very comfortable in. I like their 3 leg stool approach  Scripture informed by REASON and Tradition.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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3 years ago  ::  Feb 07, 2012 - 6:56PM #8
Bob_Bennett
Posts: 916


Jesus in New Thouight is seen as a Teacher and a Way Shower,; not as a redeemer or saviour.

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3 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2012 - 11:12AM #9
MsTopaz
Posts: 398

Feb 7, 2012 -- 6:56PM, Bob_Bennett wrote:


Jesus in New Thought is seen as a Teacher and a Way Shower, not as a redeemer or saviour.




This feels very right to me. Reading John Dominic Crossan pretty much destroyed any last tolerance I had for a theology of substitutionary atonement.






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3 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2012 - 3:08PM #10
Jupiter6208
Posts: 2,366

I agree New Thought Especially Unity appeals to my views on this.

"A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person."  Dave Berry



You will not be punished for your anger, you will be punished by your anger. Buddha.

What the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies.”


― Thomas Cranmer
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