Post Reply
4 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2010 - 11:42AM #1
Eru
Posts: 5

Hey guys I need assistance. I posted this on the general Buddhism thread without realising there was a specific meditation section, sorry :P


 



So after taking the test on the site and wanting to experience  something knew I recently became interested in Buddhism and I have some  questions.




Meditation:


I have tried  sitting on a pillow, hands linked staring at a spot about 45 degrees in  front (a candle so I have something to look at) eyes half closed,  thinking about my breathing, while I have headphones on playing soothing  Tibetan/ Meditation/ Buddhism music. My mind wanders alot and when I  have done about 10-15 minutes I feel light and fluffy. I cannot seem to  do more than 15 minutes.




Anyway, my question is, am I  meditating correctly? I found this method online. How are you supposed  to feel generally after meditating?




If I want to get more  involved in Buddhism, what book should I start with?


 


Also, what should I know about mantras?


 


Also i seem to have ALOT of anxiety , I wonder if meditation could help that.


Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Nov 15, 2010 - 11:04AM #2
Brooke
Posts: 22

Hi Eru


I too have just recently been interested in Buddhism. Not as easy as it sounds! LOL I took a book on cd out of my local library called "The Naked Buddha." It is written by Venerable Adrienne Howley and is read by Deidre Rubenstein. It is VERY interesting. It is 5 discs long and I just put it on in the car or when I go to bed. On meditating she says don't 'try' to meditate. Not to sit there and think about meditating....just meditate. If you find yourself becoming distracted then immediately acknowledge that and return to your breathing. Also, she states that there is no 'rule' as to how long you meditate. She states that you will know when it is time to stop. Even a few minutes of staying with the breath is better than attempting long periods of time where you become distracted often. I really recommend seeing if you can find this book or book on cd. It's almost a 'Buddhism for Dummies' type of of book....starts at A and goes to Z.


Brooke Smile

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2010 - 2:31PM #3
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 773

Jun 12, 2010 -- 11:42AM, Eru wrote:


Hey guys I need assistance. I posted this on the general Buddhism thread without realising there was a specific meditation section, sorry :P


 



So after taking the test on the site and wanting to experience  something knew I recently became interested in Buddhism and I have some  questions.




Meditation:


I have tried  sitting on a pillow, hands linked staring at a spot about 45 degrees in  front (a candle so I have something to look at) eyes half closed,  thinking about my breathing, while I have headphones on playing soothing  Tibetan/ Meditation/ Buddhism music. My mind wanders alot and when I  have done about 10-15 minutes I feel light and fluffy. I cannot seem to  do more than 15 minutes.




Anyway, my question is, am I  meditating correctly? I found this method online. How are you supposed  to feel generally after meditating?




If I want to get more  involved in Buddhism, what book should I start with?


 


Also, what should I know about mantras?


 


Also i seem to have ALOT of anxiety , I wonder if meditation could help that.





This website offers rescources for beginning the practice of Buddhist Meditation:


Guided Meditation


www.satipanya.org.uk/index.php?page=audi...


Essays on Buddhism


www.satipanya.org.uk/index.php?page=essa...


Free Ebook entitled:


'A Buddhist Way of Mental Training'.


www.mahamakuta.inet.co.th/english/b-way....


The English word Meditation represents something far braoder than just sitting in a posture and watching the provcess of breathing. In a Buddhist context, it covers a process of Mental Development. It is a way of training the mind to learn new ways of thinking and behaving, which support good mental health and good physical health.


 

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Nov 16, 2010 - 2:42PM #4
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 773

Metta Meditation


In my own practice of Theravada Buddhism, I have used Metta Meditation extensively, over a period of 20 years.


Metta Mediation can evolve a person very quickly in the Art of  Buddhist Mental Training, if applied skilfully. In the Begining, it is  practical just to call the words of the Buddha to mind by silently  readdng the Metta Sutta/Sutra in English:


www.bodhicitta.net/Metta%20Sutra.htm


Regular daily reading of this Sutra can really help one establish a  Buddhist practice. I found it very helpful to read it first thing in the  morning and just before retiring in the evening. Metta Meditation is  one of Four Protective Kinds of Meditation. Initially, it helps one to  develop Concentration. Later on, it helps one to developm Wisdom,  spiritual insight into the way things really are, Enlightenment,  wiithout doubt.



A BUDDHIST WAY
OF
MENTAL TRAINING

Chapter 13
Four Kinds of Protective Meditation

2. Metta—loving-kindness for all beings



The cultivation of Metta drives away anger (Dosa) and ill-will  (Vyapada). Therefore, the development of loving-kindness should be  practiced by those who have anger or ill-will. Extending one’s  loving-kindness constantly is also an especially effective manner of  merit making and is more meritorious than charity and observing the  precepts; it moves one closer to Jhana as well. The Buddha states in the  Book of Ekanipata of the Anguttaranikaya:



“Accharasanghatamattampi ce bhikkhave bhikkhu metta cittam
bhaveti asevati…”
which means,



“Bhikkhus, if you extend your loving-kindness for just an instant, you  are said to be not far from Jhana, (even for such a period of time)  being obedient and my faithful followers. Thus you waste not the food  which the people give you. It is not necessary to consider the merit of  those who extend loving-kindness for longer periods.”



This confirms that the benefits of metta are great, even with only an  instant of extension. Therefore, if performed for longer periods of  time, the benefits are inestimable. Loving-kindness is sure to protect  those who cultivate it constantly. Additionally, one with  loving-kindness is loved by all.



The Buddha said that one who extends loving-kindness receives the following benefits, if metta is cultivated properly. They are:



(1) One sleeps happily,
(2) One awakens happily,
(3) One experiences no nightmares,
(4) One is adored by mankind,
(5) One is adored by non-human beings,
(6) Deities protect him,
(7) Fire, poison and any kind of weapons cannot harm him,
(8) One’s complexion is serene,
(9) One can concentrate one’s mind quickly,
(10) One dies undeluded,
(11) If one does not progress to the final goal of Buddhism, then after
one’s death, one goes to the realm of Brahma world.



The  eleventh benefit refers to those who have attained Jhana. Those others  who have not attained to Jhana will be born in the place being  appropriate to the merit they have accumulated.


Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2010 - 11:23AM #5
etoro
Posts: 551

In order to make ones way through the spiritual path of attainment to liberation successfully one must come to understand the true breath and scope, nature and power of the opposition. This opposition is known as devilish functions and three powerful enemies. Such a knowlegde is simply the province of the most advanced Bodhisattvas. Here we can also suggest the knowledge of the Buddha himself but the Buddha has already "thus gone" to the realm of boundless liberation and can no longer be found by non-Buddhas. The Buddha himself taught that it is the advanced Bodhisattvas, those who remain in the world of samsara teaching and guiding in accordance with circumstances and conditions are the ones who have taken a great vow to lead all living beings to enlightenment. Such teachers proscribe the methods of practice which are most appropriate in accordance with the times and the peoples capacity. 


The great teacher of Gods and Men Shakyamuni Buddha began his preaching career with the teaching of four noble truths.  By the end of his teaching career he had reduced the principle of the four noble truths into that of a single great principle or mahayana. It is recorded even in the earliest writings that the exposition of the single greatest truth was always the Buddha's ultimate goal. 


This single greatest truth is synonymous with the Buddha's state of life itself. While most would assume that this principle ot truth is "ineffable" this is not so.  It is simply the case that this principle of wisdom is known as "mantrayana" or true words.


The term mantrayana or true words indicates principles of wisdom that are unknown by persons in lower states of consciousness. This is because the objects of wisdom and insight that are manifested by yogins recide in the higher realms of consciousness.  Such objects of knowledge (Forms and The Names assigned to them by Buddhas) remain dormant and therefore latent in the minds of mundane thinkers. Therefore the trick is to call them forth by invoking the names assigned to them by skilled masters who had percieved such natures at  a time period long long ago.  Such objects of wisdom and their names are found in the highest mahayana sutras.  Meditation upon these principles is the fastest way to attain enlightenment in a single lifetime. 


According to the greatest Bodhisattvas of the modern era the correct way of practicing today given the degree of giant opposition to the spiritual path that exists in the world is to begin by embracing the wisdom of the one great vehicle and thereby percieving all the karmic manifestations which emerge from ones own life from the standpoint of this single great truth.  This principle derives from the wisdom that all karmic manifestations are themselves forms of expedient means by which the true nature of phenomena can be understood. 


The fact that a good cause leads to a good effect is already well understood by the people of the world today. The fact that all manifested phenomena are transient is also already well understood by the people of today. What people have difficulty understanding regards the question "if all causes have a corresponding effect, which is the greatest cause that leads to the greatest effect?"  Better put, as the Buddha himself states in the 16th chapter of the Lotus Sutra,


"I am ever aware of living beings
Those who practice the Way and those who do not.
I speak various Dharmas for their sakes
To save them in an appropriate manner.
I am always thinking,
"How can I cause living beings
To enter the Unsurpassed Way
And to quickly perfect the body of a Buddha?"LSch16


 


The point here is that while there are numerous practicies which manifest various states of benefit and good fortune, all good causes and practices contain within them certain and various degrees of merit in accordance with causes and conditions.  The question is which among all the various forms of practice and observance in accordance with causes and conditions can quickly obtain for us "the body of a Buddha"?  This question is the most profound of profound matters addressed in the realm of Buddhist philosophy.




 

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Nov 18, 2010 - 2:51PM #6
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 773

Meditation is Mental Development.


Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism both Teach and Value Compassion. Metta Meditation is the Foundation Practice for the Development of Compassion.



ESSENTIAL THEMES OF BUDDHISTS LECTURES

Venerable Sayadaw Ashin U Thittila (1896-1897)


Chapter 21 Compassion


By cultivating the principle of compassion in ourselves we overcome cruelty, in the course of which we cultivate wisdom, and perfect wisdom is the crown of compassion.




The notion of obtaining the Body of a Buddha is quite wrong. The aim is to develop Bodhi. 'Bodhi means 'Awakenment, Enlightenment':



www.thisismyanmar.com/nibbana/glossary.h...


BASIC PALI GLOSSARY
(Under Re-construction)


bodhi : perfect wisdom or enlightenment; enlightenment




Bodhicitta


There are two kinds of Bodhicitta.


Bodhicitta is the Enlightened Mind.


Relative Bodhicitta arises from the practioner's meditation upon and generation of Compassion for Dukkha. All sentient beings are suffering from Dukkha.


Absolute Bodhicitta is the true nature of reality. It is effortless universal compassion for all beings.


Metta Meditation is the Foundation Practice for the Development and the Perfection of Realised Compassion.


Compassion is one of the Four Brahma Viharas, Four Illimitables. It is developed in both Theravada Buddhism and Mahayana Buddhism, selflessly. Given the Selfless Nature of the Four Brahma Viharas, in that they are Four SuPramundane Mental States, Metta MediTation is a bona fide Methdology for Self-abnegation, which one must realise to become a Sotapan.


When Samadhi is realised, the Four Supramundane Aryan Paths arise. These Paths constitute discrete moments in the life of the Buddhist Meditator. They give rise to Four Supramundane Fruits, the highest of which is Arahantship, the Perfetction of Holiness:



    www.palikanon.com/english/wtb/a/ariya_pu...


Buddhist Dictionary

Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines,
by NYANATILOKA


      ariya-puggala
      or simply ariya

'Noble Ones', 'noble persons'.
(A) The 8 a. are those who have realized one of the 8 stages of holiness,

 i.e. the 4 supermundane paths (magga) and the 4 supermundane fruitions (phala) of these paths.

There are 4 pairs:

    * 1. The one realizing the path of Stream-winning (sotāpattimagga).
    * 2. The one realizing the fruition of Stream-winning (sotāpattiphala).
    * 3. The one realizing the path of Once-return (sakadāgāmimagga).
    * 4. The one realizing the fruition of Once-return (sakadāgāmiphala).
    * 5. The one realizing the path of Non-return (anāgāmimagga).
    * 6. The one realizing the fruition of Non-return (anāgāmiphala).
    * 7. The one realizing the path of Holiness (arahatta-magga).
    * 8. The one realizing the fruition of Holiness (arahatta-phala).




The Buddha's Teaching on the Four Foundations of Mindfulness considers the body to be foul and full of defilements, like excreta and bile, giving off foul smelling odours. His own body was afflicted by food poisoning and he abandoned it on his final 'journey' to Perfect Enlightenment [Mahaparinibbana Sutta]. The Body of the Buddha was burnt on a funeral pyre and transformed into ash. Being old and decrepit, it had outlived its usefulenss.


Even the Body of the Buddha was impermanent. During the Enlightenemnt of the Buddha, he became Aware of millions of previous lives. In each and everyone of these lives, he had lived in a different, impermanent body. This is the Doctrine of Anicca, which can only be penetrated by the practice of Vipassana Meditation. Vipassana Mediation is the Unique Meditation practice that was discovered by the Buddha. In the context of the Eightfold Noble Path. One must first become established in Sila and Samadhi before undertaking Vipassana Meditation proper.


In the same way, the Dhamma is the Raft which takes a person to the other shore. When one reaches the other shore, the Dhamma is abandoned. For the Enlightened, there is No Buddha, No Dhamma, No Sangha, No Nirvana and No Samsara. But, the notion that the Buddha cannot be known becasue he has 'gone thus' is incorrect. The Buddha taught that anyone who sees the Dhamma sees him. The Dhamma is preserved for all beings at all times by the Ariya Sangha.


Thus, the Student from any age can hear the Word of the Buddha, practise to understand  the Dhamma, correctly. Then the Buddha is seen. To help with this process, Theravada Buddhists build Peace Pagodas which 'House the Mind of the Buddha' quite literally. When entering a concecrated Peace Pagoda, one Enters the Mind of the Buddha.


And, in this day and age, more than 2500 years after the Death of the Buddha, devout Buddhists take Refuge in the Buddha, Take Refuge in the Dhamma, take Refuge in the Sangha. But, the Dhamma is not just the Word of the Buddha, it is the Nature of the Buddha. The Ariya Sangha are the Guardians and the Teachers of the Dhamma; the same Dhamma which enables a worldy human being to train and to see the Buddha. In this context, Theravada Buddhism is a Living Faith with a living Teacher, the Buddha.


And this is Supramundane, Transcendental Reality. The Buddha died, then purified Death and realised Nibbana, without anymore rebirth to come. Nibbana is not merely a state of 'No-Craving'. It is Uncreated Reality. It is beyond Speech because there are no words or language to express it. It is beyond 'Unity'. It is Beyond 'Eternity'. It is beyond Space. It is beyond Time. It is Beyond The Buddha, The Dhamma and The Sangha. It is beyond the Bodhisattva and the Arahant. But, it may be realised. When it is realilsed, there is no more Rebirth.


Silence is the Vehicle for Realising Nibbana. Meditation is the Vehicle for Silencing the Mind. Metta Meditation [when skilfully practised] can take a person all the way to this silent realisation of Nibbana.


But, in this world, the Buddha taught that whomsoever sees the Dhamma sees the Buddha. For the sincere Metta Meditator, it is not difficult to see the Dhamma, for the Dhamma is Metta.


If a person realises Effortless Metta, Absolute Metta, then one  simultaneoulsy realises the Other Three Sublime Brahma Viharas because:


The Loving Mind is Compassionate.


The Loving Mind is Sympathetically Joyful For the Happiness of others.


The Loving Mind is Tranquil.


The Development of Mindfulness takes place in Samatha Meditation for the realisation of Samadhi. But, a person of Faithful Temperament may practise Samatha Meditation by the Development of Metta. this is what is meant above when it is explained that for a person who practices Metta, Jhana is never far away. The fruit of Samatha Meditation is Absorption into the Jhana Mental States. [In the context of Mental Development, Mindfulness is a quality of Samadhi. The realisation of Samadhi is essential for the realisation of Nibbana.


 

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  May 20, 2011 - 7:35AM #7
Karma_yeshe_dorje
Posts: 11,694

It would help to find a local Buddhist centre and join a regular meditation group. 


Cushions


This evening I was at a Nyingma centre's drop-in meditation.


Shrine

Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  May 21, 2011 - 3:23AM #8
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 773
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  May 24, 2011 - 6:01AM #9
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 773

Karma_Yeshe_Dorje


You asked about a local Meditation Group.


From some of your quotes in other discussions, you have referred to news media from Canberra. Therefore I am assuming that you may live in this area.


Sri Lanka has the World's oldest School of Buddhism, and is the country in which the entire Tipitaka of the Theravada was first committed to wrting, on "Bodhi Leaves". Literally on leaves.


In my post above, I provided a link for the Sri Lanka Buddhist Vihara. Not only does Sri Lanka have the Oldest School of Buddhism in the world, it is th eodlest of the Theravada Schools. English is an Administrative Language in Sri Lanka.




www.slbvc.org/index.php?option=com_conte...

Sri Lanka Buddhist Vihara - Canberra


Meditation & Suttra discussion sessions

The meditation program follows the method described in Mahasatipatthana Sutta. In this discourse, Buddha said:

"This is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow & distress, for the disappearance of pain & sadness, for the gaining of the right path, for the realization of Nibbana: - that is to say, the four foundations of mindfulness.

"What are the four? Here, monks, a monk abides contemplating body as body, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world, he abides contemplating feelings as feelings ...; he abides contemplating mind as mind ..., he abides contemplating dhamma as dhamma, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world."

The above four foundations of mindfulness consists of 26 meditation subjects and it takes about six months to complete the whole meditation.

The medtation program and Suttra discussion is conducted by Dr. Lalith Ranathuna. They are

 * Meditation -English Wednesday 7:30pm - 8:30pm
 * Suttra discussions - English Fiday 7:30pm - 8:30pm
 * Meditation - Sinhala Sunday 3:30pm - 4:30pm

Everyone is welcome to attend these sessions.


Bodhi Leaves




www.urbandharma.org/udharma/councils.htm...

Buddhist Councils - Venerable Dr. Rewata Dhamma

[...]

THE FOURTH COUNCIL

The Fourth Council was held in Tambapanni (Sri Lanka) in 29 B.C. under the patronage of King Vattagamani. The main reason for its convening was the realization that it was now not possible for the majority of monks to retain the entire Tipitaka in their memories as had been the case formerly for the Venerable Mahinda and those who followed him soon after. Therefore, as the art of writing had, by this time developed substantially it was thought expedient and necessary to have the entire body of the Buddha's teaching written down. King Vattagamani supported the monk's idea and a council was held specifically to reduce the Tipitaka in its entirety to writing. Therefore, so that the genuine Dhamma might be lastingly preserved, the Venerable Maharakkhita and five hundred monks recited the words of the Buddha and then wrote them down on palm leaves. This remarkable project took place in a cave called, the Aloka lena, situated in the cleft of an ancient landslip near what is now Matale. Thus the aim of the Council was achieved and the preservation in writing of the authentic Dhamma was ensured. In the Eighteenth Century, King Vijayarajasiha had images of the Buddha created in this cave.

[...]









Edit - Edited by mod to correct display problem.
Moderated by RenGalskap on May 24, 2011 - 10:31AM
Quick Reply
Cancel
3 years ago  ::  Jun 12, 2011 - 6:52PM #10
nnn123
Posts: 1,530

some links below with pertinent information.


 


The form is not as important as the aspiration to proceed on the path.  Our sincere aspiration will always find the way.


 


Zen Mountain Monastery Meditation Instructions

www.mro.org/zmm/teachings/meditation.php


+++++


Zen Centers Guide

www.dharmanet.org/infowebZen.htm


++++++++


Buddhist Meditation #1:

www.freemeditations.com/buddhist_meditat...

+++

Buddhist Meditation #2:

www.freemeditations.com/buddhist_breath_...

Quick Reply
Cancel
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook