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Switch to Forum Live View Pow-Wow/Braucherei.....Also, Appalachian Granny Magic
4 years ago  ::  Jun 08, 2010 - 10:24PM #1
Brownowl33
Posts: 443

I originally posted a query on this over on the Folk Magic board, but that place is dead and there hasn't been a single post since mine for many months, so I thought I would try my hand here and see what I came across.  I've recently started researching more about North American magical practices, and these two are the main ones (besides Hoodoo) that keep popping up.  There's an ok amount of information about Pow Wow out there (not all of it very good,I'm afraid) and I was able to get a copy of  Long Lost Friend.  Though it's heavily Christian-based and I am not a Christian, there is still a wonderful amount of highly practical charms and spells to be found in this book, and it's probably my new favourite magical text.  I've also got a great one called Hex and Spellwork that I found very useful.



I've had much less luck trying to find out about Appalachian magical traditions.  There are a few books out there (I've got one on the way right now, called "In A Graveyard at Midnight") but there doesn't seem to be much to go on.  I've become fascinated by these very old practices ,though, and am trying to learn as much about it as I can.  So much of it is practical magic requiring little in the way of tools, and mainly seems to be used for healing or reversing bad luck or ill wishes (either unintentional, or deliberate) from others.


Does anyone have anything they'd like to recommend I read on the subjects, or know of any other resources?  Lately there seems to be renewed interest in Braucherei, and classes are being offered on the subject, but they are both very expensive AND in another state, and I am not entirely convinced that's the appropriate way to learn about it.


Thanks in advance for any help!

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2010 - 6:56PM #2
Teufelhex
Posts: 171

Jun 8, 2010 -- 10:24PM, Brownowl33 wrote:


I originally posted a query on this over on the Folk Magic board, but that place is dead and there hasn't been a single post since mine for many months, so I thought I would try my hand here and see what I came across.  I've recently started researching more about North American magical practices, and these two are the main ones (besides Hoodoo) that keep popping up.  There's an ok amount of information about Pow Wow out there (not all of it very good,I'm afraid) and I was able to get a copy of  Long Lost Friend.  Though it's heavily Christian-based and I am not a Christian, there is still a wonderful amount of highly practical charms and spells to be found in this book, and it's probably my new favourite magical text.  I've also got a great one called Hex and Spellwork that I found very useful.


 



I've had much less luck trying to find out about Appalachian magical traditions.  There are a few books out there (I've got one on the way right now, called "In A Graveyard at Midnight") but there doesn't seem to be much to go on.  I've become fascinated by these very old practices ,though, and am trying to learn as much about it as I can.  So much of it is practical magic requiring little in the way of tools, and mainly seems to be used for healing or reversing bad luck or ill wishes (either unintentional, or deliberate) from others.


 


Does anyone have anything they'd like to recommend I read on the subjects, or know of any other resources?  Lately there seems to be renewed interest in Braucherei, and classes are being offered on the subject, but they are both very expensive AND in another state, and I am not entirely convinced that's the appropriate way to learn about it.


 


Thanks in advance for any help!




 


Sorry Chris.  PA Dutch Pow-Wow is Christian based Faith healing.


I miss placed my links list.  I have one on my webpage.   Grimoirs of the Pow-wow.


Grimoires


Scroll down the large frame and the links to the books are at the bottom

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 21, 2010 - 11:03PM #3
Brownowl33
Posts: 443

Jun 21, 2010 -- 6:56PM, Teufelhex wrote:


Jun 8, 2010 -- 10:24PM, Brownowl33 wrote:


 


I originally posted a query on this over on the Folk Magic board, but that place is dead and there hasn't been a single post since mine for many months, so I thought I would try my hand here and see what I came across.  I've recently started researching more about North American magical practices, and these two are the main ones (besides Hoodoo) that keep popping up.  There's an ok amount of information about Pow Wow out there (not all of it very good,I'm afraid) and I was able to get a copy of  Long Lost Friend.  Though it's heavily Christian-based and I am not a Christian, there is still a wonderful amount of highly practical charms and spells to be found in this book, and it's probably my new favourite magical text.  I've also got a great one called Hex and Spellwork that I found very useful.


 


 


 



I've had much less luck trying to find out about Appalachian magical traditions.  There are a few books out there (I've got one on the way right now, called "In A Graveyard at Midnight") but there doesn't seem to be much to go on.  I've become fascinated by these very old practices ,though, and am trying to learn as much about it as I can.  So much of it is practical magic requiring little in the way of tools, and mainly seems to be used for healing or reversing bad luck or ill wishes (either unintentional, or deliberate) from others.


 


 


 


Does anyone have anything they'd like to recommend I read on the subjects, or know of any other resources?  Lately there seems to be renewed interest in Braucherei, and classes are being offered on the subject, but they are both very expensive AND in another state, and I am not entirely convinced that's the appropriate way to learn about it.


 


 


 


Thanks in advance for any help!


 




 


 


 


Sorry Chris.  PA Dutch Pow-Wow is Christian based Faith healing.


 


I miss placed my links list.  I have one on my webpage.   Grimoirs of the Pow-wow.


 


Grimoires


 


Scroll down the large frame and the links to the books are at the bottom





 


I realize it's Christian based; that's why I mentioned it.  No need to be sorry about it.  I don't pretend to be Christian, I'm just interested in the history of the practice as well as some of the charms (not all of which call upon Jesus.)  Long Lost Friend has quite a few good ones that don't involve a deity, or I can always substitute my own deity names as needed in the verbal incantations.


 


Anyway, thanks for the link.

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 22, 2010 - 12:23AM #4
inthemidstwest
Posts: 136

I just started reading "Of Men and Plants", Maurice Messegue.


 


It's a loose autobio of Messegue's childhood during the 30's and 40's.  Messegue  journeys with his father, Camille, and shares his experiences with herbalism post WWII.


 


 


There are some interesting passages dealing with the author's transition from son of a sharecropper to WWII General's recommended 'healer'.


 


Good reading and some of Messegue's theories are down to earth, no matter what belief system you follow.


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 26, 2010 - 12:51PM #5
Brownowl33
Posts: 443

Jun 22, 2010 -- 12:23AM, inthemidstwest wrote:


I just started reading "Of Men and Plants", Maurice Messegue.


 


 


 


It's a loose autobio of Messegue's childhood during the 30's and 40's.  Messegue  journeys with his father, Camille, and shares his experiences with herbalism post WWII.


 


 


 


 


 


There are some interesting passages dealing with the author's transition from son of a sharecropper to WWII General's recommended 'healer'.


 


 


 


Good reading and some of Messegue's theories are down to earth, no matter what belief system you follow.


 


 


 


 





 


Thanks!  That sounds right up my alley.  I'll try and include it on my Amazon.com wish list.

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2 years ago  ::  Feb 16, 2012 - 5:25PM #6
GrannyGill
Posts: 1

I am an Appalachian Granny Witch, but I still love to read about what other families do.  The problem is that is a family tradition, and so it is hard to make blanket statements about it.  And each generation learns from the one before, and then brings their own experience and twist to what was done before.  So it is an emminently practical form of witchcraft, take what you can, use it, and if you don't need it, leave it be.


There is also an underlying assumption that not everyone will have talent in all areas.  For in my family, we had a person gifted at home remedies and herbal healing, another good with "fortune telling" and mediumship, another who knew wild plants and their properties, and so on.  Elders tend to teach "in family" whenever possible, but if there is no one in a given generation who has "the gift" in the area that person works in, then they might teach to a young person within the ties of alliance with the family rather than let the knowledge be lost...but with the understanding that that family now has an obligation to "teach back" if the gift turns up in the originating family later on.  But that is rare.


I've found the best source material to be journals of folklore societies and such.  It's very hit or miss, but bits and pieces that are useful will turn up from time to time.


 


Remember, you are trying to understand the pattern in a quilt that is more holes than fabric these days.  There aren't many old-timers like me left, and the urbanization of the families means the young ones are interested or don't see the use of it any more.  I just keep sewing my own patches on it for myself, and trying to remember what I can!


 

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