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Switch to Forum Live View Sasquatch and the spririts of the forest.
4 years ago  ::  May 28, 2010 - 6:43PM #1
Bairre
Posts: 122

Sasquatch seems to me like what the ancient Celts called the Greenman and the Germans called various things such as Woodwose which is a giant, hairy wildman who protects the forests.  In European lore there are many different kinds of forest spirits, Wrights, Fairies, Elves, Dwarves, Gnomes, Banshees, and others.  I know that Sasquatch plays important part in the lore of several Tribes from the western areas of this continent, and even in other places as well.  I live in western North Carolina, and the Cherokee have stories about the "Big Man" which fits the basic description and characteristics of Sasquatch.  However, the Cherokee revere the "Little People" more in that you hear more stories even modern stories more often than stories of the Big Men. 


It seems likely, considering the pre-Christian sensabilities of Europeans and Indiginous Americans in relation to nature.

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 13, 2010 - 2:14PM #2
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Your post would be so much more interesting if you had a point.............

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 14, 2010 - 2:17PM #3
Bairre
Posts: 122

I was hoping to see if there was any sort of comparative concepts.  That's all.

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 17, 2010 - 8:55PM #4
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Sasquach and little people aren't comparitive, so you've sort of lost me.


Are you saying that there are similarities among divergent cultures regarding things like mythic stories?


 


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 19, 2010 - 2:55AM #5
Bairre
Posts: 122

Jun 17, 2010 -- 8:55PM, wohali wrote:


Sasquach and little people aren't comparitive, so you've sort of lost me.


 


Are you saying that there are similarities among divergent cultures regarding things like mythic stories?


You're right, I should have been more clear.  I was comparing little people to other forest spirits in general.  I meant to say that they seem similar to Elves and Fairies. 


However, yes, basically, I was asking what Indigenous North Americans thought of the hypothosis that Woodwose or perhaps even Werewolves (not the Hollywood horror type) might compare with Sasquatch.  Tall, strong, hairy, wild, howling, etc.  Just curious.  I tend to see such things as a spirit of the forest.  That's how the Europeans viewed Woodwose, and I was curious if it was also similar in North America.


Sorry for not being more clear.


 


 


 


 


 





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4 years ago  ::  Jun 19, 2010 - 4:27PM #6
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Sasquach would be comparable to a werewolf in that they are both depicted as hairy. As to their origins, actions, etc., not so much.


You can make a case for basic similarities between traditions of different peoples. After all they are all people.


 

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 19, 2010 - 8:26PM #7
Bairre
Posts: 122

Werewolves were originally seen as shapeshifters who would mostly protect sacred/unknown parts of the wilds.  The movie depiction was only one aspect that was picked up on and exagerated.


So, then Sasquatch is not seen as a Forest Spirit by North American Tribes?  That's cool.  I was just curious.

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 19, 2010 - 9:07PM #8
wohali
Posts: 10,227

I guess I'm more familiar with the classic Greek and Norse versions of the myth, where people became werewolves through misfortune and were generally bad characters, something akin to Skinwalkers.


Sasquach, Yeti, Yowie, Wendingo, Bowkwis are prime creatures; they don't change from another form, so how can they be comparable to werewolves?

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 20, 2010 - 1:28PM #9
Bairre
Posts: 122

I was just curious.

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4 years ago  ::  Jun 20, 2010 - 2:26PM #10
wohali
Posts: 10,227

Curious is good.

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