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5 years ago  ::  Mar 26, 2010 - 10:00PM #1
Wolfhoundgrowl
Posts: 82

How many of us agnostics are religious in some way?


I'm Quakerly

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2010 - 1:19AM #2
BillThinks4Himself
Posts: 3,207

Mar 26, 2010 -- 10:00PM, Wolfhoundgrowl wrote:


How many of us agnostics are religious in some way?


I'm Quakerly



I've never been to a Quaker service but I really favor the Quakers for their decency and common sense.  I like the idea of unprogrammed services as well as the Quaker idea that personal inspiraction and conviction trumps the dead letter of scripture.

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2010 - 3:03AM #3
BlackWingBlueSky
Posts: 386

Mar 26, 2010 -- 10:00PM, Wolfhoundgrowl wrote:


How many of us agnostics are religious in some way?


I'm Quakerly





Gun to my head and forced to subscribe to a religion, I'd pick the Unitarian Universalists.  Unless I was allowed to get away with claiming to be a Pagan.  Otherwise, they all have too much supernatural going on for me to feel any sense of affinity.


 

Sandy

I've seen normal, and I'm not impressed.
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5 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2010 - 6:58PM #4
Agnosticspirit
Posts: 9,244

Hallo wolfhound, can you please define quakerly? What does that mean? I don't know that much about this religion, other than they were the first Christian congregation to reject biblical scriptures that condoned and supported slavery. Quakers have a proud legacy of abolitionism to their credit, without them other Christians may have taken longer to advocate an end to this great wrong.


I'm curious what the Quaker position was on manifest destiny, did they speak out against the genocide commited upon the Native Americans?

Tribalism, ethnocentricism, racism, nationalism, and FEAR is the Mind Killer... >:(

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 29, 2010 - 5:20PM #5
BillThinks4Himself
Posts: 3,207

Quakers, or the Society of Friends, have a unique doctrine of the Inner Light.  They believe that one should follow one's convictions, which are every bit as important as scripture.


With respect to the Native Americans and Manifest Destiny, Quakers are associated with the state of Pennsylvania, a former colony granted to William Penn, a well-to-do Quaker who was concerned that Quakers were getting mistreated in New Jersey.  The king gave him the land behind New Jersey, which was the only colony in Colonial America that didn't have direct access to the sea.  Penn's Woods, as the name suggests, put Quakers into direct contact with the Native Americans, who could have slaughtered them had they not had great respect for these odd white people who taught each other to live in harmony, both with nature and with each other.  The Quaker refusal to go to war, especially with the Native Americans, was one reason the colony was later taken over, in terms of leadership, by non-Quakers.  Pennsylvania did, however, prove to be an unusually open society with tremendous religious diversity for the time.  In addition to Quakers, it became home of the German Baptists - which included Mennonites and the Amish - as well as Jews.

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 31, 2010 - 7:08PM #6
Myownpath
Posts: 949

I visited a Quaker church and attended a "meeting." I do not see how anyone agnostic or atheist could be a Quaker. Unitarian yes.

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5 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2010 - 12:32AM #7
BillThinks4Himself
Posts: 3,207

Mar 31, 2010 -- 7:08PM, Myownpath wrote:


I visited a Quaker church and attended a "meeting." I do not see how anyone agnostic or atheist could be a Quaker. Unitarian yes.



I've never attended a Quaker meeting.  My "easy pass" for these guys is based on things I've read about them.  They seem like nice people.  I don't know how an atheist or agnostic would want to be a Quaker - unless they were so fond of the people or the style of worship were worth being counted among a group of lovable theists.  The Quakers have a reputation as being extraordinarily nonjudgmental, relative to other Christians.  These people don't believe in any human authority.  They don't even believe that scripture trumps personal conviction.  The inner light is a religious concept but it's so generic I could see it secularized.  Quakers were early abolitionists.  Quakers were also historically among the first to fight for the rights of gays.  Quakers don't believe in war or in capital punishment.  These are an easy group of people to get along with, so it doesn't surprise me that they've come to the attention of any atheist or agnostic.  I don't think Quaker beliefs are completely compatible with atheism or agnosticism, but I think Quakers are probably compatible with skeptics.  Certainly, the best fit is with Unitarians, another group I'd like to visit, if just to squeeze some flesh among nice people.

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5 years ago  ::  Apr 01, 2010 - 6:35PM #8
Wolfhoundgrowl
Posts: 82

There are quite a number of atheists and agnostics within unprogrammed Quakerism.


 


Variations of opinion on 'how it works' but for the most part Quakerism  is about how one lives/ approaches life.


 


I've been 'involved' with Quakerism as an Evangelical, a Liberal Protestant and now as a Post-Theist. It's a very fluid tradition due to 'the light within.' The light within is the very essence of Quakersim, even though it was originally understood as the light of Christ. European Quakerism is much more liberal than in the US. 


 


I'm not saying it's THE way, but it's my way & the way of Friends.


 


Plz see


nontheistfriends.org


for clarification

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 12, 2010 - 4:14AM #9
Jonathanelliot
Posts: 55

I used to be Christian, flirted with atheism and now call myself agnostic.


I'm still interested in finding out if there's anything out there, but I wouldn't say I am committed to spirituality. So I'm at the "open", or "weak" end of the scale.


Some are theistic agnostics, or agnostic theists, which I would argue is actually the position of anyone who is a "true believer". Belief vs knowledge.  Not to say that belief is inferior in that sense, just that it isn't knowledge.


there's a really good book from the point of view of a theist agnostic... um... (can't remember, will come back to you)


At least, that's the point I've come to so far Cool


Jonathan from Spritzophrenia


 


 

http://spritzophrenia.wordpress.com
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 06, 2011 - 10:23PM #10
Fae
Posts: 47

I am currently studying Buddhism. Can't say that I will make a go of it, I have qualms with labeling myself. But so far I love it's principles. I also really enjoy pagan holidays lol and keep some of them.

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