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5 years ago  ::  Jan 14, 2010 - 3:22PM #51
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788

 


Jan 14, 2010 -- 9:55AM, etoro wrote:


Jan 14, 2010 -- 7:03AM, Bhakta_glenn wrote:


"Of course you did.  But as I have provided above Buddhist history takes many twists and turns. So do all religions. The world today is teetering on the brink of global distaster. Given what you have expressed thus far it appears that your solution is simply to escape off the planet."


Etoro:


With Respect.


 



What I have posted so far is within the context of Theravadin Buddhist Practice. Your reaction to it only proves that your understanding of it from the Lotus Sutra is grounded in a misunderstanding of what Theravada Buddhism actually Teaches.


 Angst about global disaster is a serious hindrance on the Eightfold Noble Path, which prevents one from realising Samadhi and is a fetter that binds one to the Wheel of Rebirth, one of four mental factors inseparably associated with all unwholesome consciousness. For these reasons, my Theravadin Buddhist Teacher has taught me how to overcome this sense of angst about global disaster, by the Development of Sila (16 Years of Practice), and by Samatha Meditation (Tranquillity Meditation, which is my current stage of practice).


The actual training in Theravada Buddhism shows one how to develop calm mental states and how to be neither attached to worldly happiness nor repulsed by evil.


With regard to your criticism of my 'expressions' being 'off this planet', I would like to bring it to your attention that since 1991, formerly under the close supervision of Dr Rewata Dhamma, and latterly under the close supervision of a qualified Theravadin Buddhist Teacher trained by him, the main thrust of my practice has been focused upon 'Meditation in Daily Life'.


 The last time I visited the Temple was in 2006 to consult my Teacher. She gave me a programme of practices which will terminate in the summer of 2010. I live amongst non-Buddhists and practice for 21 hours per week in Sitting Meditation. During Daily Life, I practice 'Noting', which is a Skill taught in Sitting Meditation.. I 'Meditate on the Fly', which means that as I am going about my daily business, I practise Mindfulness in Daily Life:


 


A BUDDHIST WAY
OF
MENTAL TRAINING

by

Ven. Phra Tepvisuddhikavi
(Pichitr Thitavanno)
Lord Abbot of Wat Somanasvihara

and

Ex-Vice Rector for Academic Affairs,
Lecturer in Buddhism
Mahamakut Buddhist University
Bangkok, Thailand
B.E. 2543 / A.D. 2000


www.mahamakuta.inet.co.th/english/b-way%...


Chapter 14
Meditation in Daily Life


"How can we put Meditation into Practice in daily life?

"Before bringing meditation into practice in daily life, we must study the theory of Buddhist meditation until we know well the methods of meditation practice and then bring them into practice every day, in the same way as the athlete exercises to build up his strength. The athlete obtains benefits from game playing to be used for himself and for others when he knows well the way of the game and trains himself accordingly. Because, if we do not know the way of practice of meditation or even if we do know it well but do not always practice it, then it cannot bring great fruit. Sometimes, it can’t bring any fruit to us even though we try to bring it into practice. So it is not sufficient to apply oneself only to the theoretical knowledge of Buddhism. The realization of the Buddha’s teachings in daily life is essential."


With regard to Mantra Yoga, I am an adept but have been advised by qualified Teachers from both the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism and the Theravada School of Buddhism to slow down and try to live at a slower pace. For this reason, I have been assigned to a Qualified Teacher in the Theravada School of Buddhism who will oversee all of my Spiritual Development, Buddhist and Vedic.
 


 I completed a Training Course in Theravadin Buddhist Meditation (Samatha Meditation and Vipassana Meditation) under the close supervision of Dr Rewata Dhamma. This was for a period of Five Years. During this period, I was assigned to my Guru.


The local Vihara is affiliated with the Mahasi Sayadaw of Myanmar; and an overwiew of the Paths of Purification that accord with my Training may be read by clicking this link:


www.bbvt.org.uk/Paths%20of%20purificatio...

Venerable Dr.Rewata Dhamma

PATHS OF PURIFICATION


"The main aim of Insight Meditation is to realise the Four Noble Truths in order to attain the state of Enlightenment."





Glen, angst about the world of mankind was the reason why the Buddha saught the correct Path. You are engaging in sophistry.


irrespective of all this sophistry, the question is asked, to what end does all this talk of meditative practice serve.   If you can understand my meaning here much of what you express sounds like a great indulgence with one's own self existence. What purpose is there in all of this? Indulging in all the nuances of one's own self nature is quite neurotic dont you think? Where does it lead, a sense of personal nobility? That would be egocentric.


Glen, our lives are simply a composite of causes and conditions. They are a reflection of all other beings. This is the nature of self and other. It is a constantly shifting entity. Once you return to activity from meditation you must still confront your karma, your relationships, your shifting bodily and emotional states, your strengths and weaknesses, your financial condition, your need for survivial, the needs of your family, friends and loved ones. What are you going to do about all that.  How do you improve this reality?




Etoro:


With Respect



Thank you for explaining that you do not actually understand Theravadin Buddhist Meditation. It confirms that the Lotus Sutra has nothing of value to say about it.

 

With regard to the Lotus Sutra, it is taught by the Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism, and my Teacher will Teach it to me, if it becomes relevant to our practice. For the moment, I reiterate what I have said before, I am not yet ready to receive that training due to the state of my ignorance.

 

My postings do not contain any sophistry. They represent my own best effort to faithfully reproduce what I actually do in Meditation.

 

In Theravada Buddhism, Angst is recognised as an abbreviation of Anxiety, a clinical condition. It is taught that what motivated the Bodhisatta to practise to become a Sammasambuddha, was Compassion.

 

It is taught that one ought to develop Compassion for Dukkha. Dukkha is a Universal Illness, which underpins 'global disaster'. But, Angst is considered to be morallly weak, and vulgar.

I should point out to you that I am Clinically Diagnosed with Cognitive Impairment and Anxiety, Severe Mental Illness, and that my Theravadin Buddhist Training is done with reference to any clinical diagnoses that I have received.


20 years ago, I began to practise Tibetan Buddhism. I could not remain silent for a minute, nor could I sit still for a minute. That is how bad my Angst was. The Tibetan Teacher advised me to sit in Meditation for only Five Minutes per day. He advised me to set aside one half hour and to sit Five Times for One Minute Per Sitting within that half hour. I successfully followed his advice.

In August 1991, I attended a 10 Day Retreat, I was able to sit for Three Hours without moving. But I had to breath very quickly to cope with the build up of Anxiety.

Today, I can sit for an Hour without moving and breath very slowly, in complete Tranquillity.
With regard to my Clinically Diagnosed Anxiety, Samatha Meditation enables me to attenuate it for these periods in which I meditate. This is how Theravadin Buddhism has helped me.

During the last 20 years, there have been callers at the door from various religions. Most of them tell me how they can do better than my Theravadin Buddhist Teachers. Not one of them has actually shown any real insight into how to practically deal with the condition, not one.

But, My Teacher has. This is why I trust my Teacher, and follow her training and advice.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 14, 2010 - 4:34PM #52
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788

"irrespective of all this sophistry, the question is asked, to what end does all this talk of meditative practice serve."


Etoro,


With Respect


The Practice of Theravada Buddhist Meditation enables one to live well and prepare for Death.


 


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2010 - 6:29AM #53
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788

 


Etoro,


With Respect


Schism in Buddhism


#30


Bhakta_glenn wrote
"Karma_Yeshe_Dorje

"Thank you for pointing out that your original post was written in the context of Mahayana Buddhism. One of the difficulties with trying to discuss Buddhism is that there is no such thing as a Unified School of Buddhism, espousing one Dharma and One World view. Historically, there has been a Schism, and differing Dharmas have appeared. All of them claim the Buddha as their founder." 




Etoro Wrote


#43
"I do not agree. It is important that you see the conditional and one sided workings of your own mind before you go on to make such overarching claims. The problem as I see it is that your knowledge of Buddhism is very limited. Your knowledge of the achievements of the Buddha are also limited."


In order to clarify this point about whether there has been a schism in Buddhism, I refer to an article by Dr Rewata Dhamma, entitled


The Contribution of Buddhism to the World of Art and Architecture


www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha261.h...




According to Dr Rewata Dhamma


The two Buddhist Schools known as the Theravada (Hinayana) and the Mahayana arose as a result of a rift in the Sangha caused by a dispute over the rule of life for the monks. This Schism occured during the Second Buddhist Council. The Buddha left no successor as his heir. He explicitly stated that the Dhamma and the Vinaya would be the Teacher after his Death.


According to Dr Rewata Dhamma, the Schism proved to be fundamental, and led to the Dhamma being interpreted differently. This Schism broguht about the two different Schools of Buddhism with different beliefs and ideals:


"Despite the schism and the establishing of the two        schools neither school's adherents abandoned the Buddha nor the ultimate        goal of deliverance from suffering and rebirth culminating in the        realisation of Nibbana or Nirvana. However, as the word, 'yana' implies,        the vehicle used to reach that goal was different. It is this choice of        vehicle which accounts for a difference in the beliefs and ideals which we        see mirrored in the art and architecture created by Theravadins and        Mahayanists throughout the history of Buddhism."


Dr Rewata Dhamma is now deceased. He was a Scholar Monk and well qualified to write on both the Theravada and the Mahayana, as this short biographical piece confirms:


web.ukonline.co.uk/buddhism/bvmonks.htm


The differences between the Theravada and the Mahayana are referred to here by Dr Rewata Dhamma:


"The main difference between the Theravada and Mahayana Schools of Art is their subject matter. This difference was a direct reflection of the different ideals and beliefs held by the two schools. For the Theravadins the ideal is the Arahat, who like a Buddha seeks to eradicate suffering and rebirth in Samsara through renouncing the world, and through the eradication of greed, hatred and delusion. This achievement is made possible if one follows the Middle Way and the Noble Eightfold Path as taught by the Buddha Gotama. Nibbana is the Theravadin's final goal and is attainable through the practice of insight. These beliefs and ideals form the subject matter of Theravada Buddhist Art. On the other hand, although the followers of the Mahayana School of Buddhism uphold the goal of Nirvana also and deliverance from endless suffering and rebirth in Samsara, they have a different spiritual hero. Their hero is not the Buddha Gotama, but the Bodhisattva. A Bodhisattva is a kind of divine saviour, whose role is to aid any being desirous of deliverance and Nirvana. In Mahayana Buddhism anyone can become enlightened and renunciation of the world in order to win Arahatship is not absolutely necessary, but the practice of specific rites and rituals and meditations and visualizations is. These spiritual practices will aid the practitioner in purifying the mind and will also attract the help of the Bodhisattva. The Mahayana School recognised the historical Buddha Gotama, the Shakyamuni, but raised him to the level of a god."


Dr Rewata Dhamma aslo attended the Sixth Buddhist Council, in Yangon to establish the Scriptures:


www.bbvt.org.uk/Resident_Monks.asp


"Sayadaw Dr.Rewata Dhamma was born in Myanmar in December 1929 and was brought up in the rural village of Thamangol in the Hanthada District on the banks of the Irrawaddy. Entering the monastery as a young novice, he took full monastic ordination at the age of 20. After studying Theravada Buddhism under several eminent scholar monks, he passed the highest examination in scriptural studies at the age of 23 and was awarded the prestigious title of Sasanadhaja-siripavara dhammacariya in 1953. The following year he was among those helping during the Sixth General Sangha Council held in Yangon to establish the scriptures. In 1956, he went to India to study Hindi and Sanskrit as a state scholar, and then continued to study Indian philosophy and Mahayana Buddhism in Varanasi University."




 

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 15, 2010 - 5:15PM #54
etoro
Posts: 565

Jan 15, 2010 -- 6:29AM, Bhakta_glenn wrote:


 


Etoro,


With Respect


Schism in Buddhism


#30


Bhakta_glenn wrote
"Karma_Yeshe_Dorje

"Thank you for pointing out that your original post was written in the context of Mahayana Buddhism. One of the difficulties with trying to discuss Buddhism is that there is no such thing as a Unified School of Buddhism, espousing one Dharma and One World view. Historically, there has been a Schism, and differing Dharmas have appeared. All of them claim the Buddha as their founder." 




Etoro Wrote


#43
"I do not agree. It is important that you see the conditional and one sided workings of your own mind before you go on to make such overarching claims. The problem as I see it is that your knowledge of Buddhism is very limited. Your knowledge of the achievements of the Buddha are also limited."


In order to clarify this point about whether there has been a schism in Buddhism, I refer to an article by Dr Rewata Dhamma, entitled


The Contribution of Buddhism to the World of Art and Architecture


www.buddhanet.net/budsas/ebud/ebdha261.h...




According to Dr Rewata Dhamma


The two Buddhist Schools known as the Theravada (Hinayana) and the Mahayana arose as a result of a rift in the Sangha caused by a dispute over the rule of life for the monks. This Schism occured during the Second Buddhist Council. The Buddha left no successor as his heir. He explicitly stated that the Dhamma and the Vinaya would be the Teacher after his Death.


According to Dr Rewata Dhamma, the Schism proved to be fundamental, and led to the Dhamma being interpreted differently. This Schism broguht about the two different Schools of Buddhism with different beliefs and ideals:


"Despite the schism and the establishing of the two        schools neither school's adherents abandoned the Buddha nor the ultimate        goal of deliverance from suffering and rebirth culminating in the        realisation of Nibbana or Nirvana. However, as the word, 'yana' implies,        the vehicle used to reach that goal was different. It is this choice of        vehicle which accounts for a difference in the beliefs and ideals which we        see mirrored in the art and architecture created by Theravadins and        Mahayanists throughout the history of Buddhism."


Dr Rewata Dhamma is now deceased. He was a Schloar Monk and well qualified to write on both the Theravada and the Mahayana, as this short biographical piece confirms:


web.ukonline.co.uk/buddhism/bvmonks.htm


The differences between the Theravada and the Mahayana are referred to here by Dr Rewata Dhamma:


"The main difference between the Theravada and Mahayana Schools of Art is their subject matter. This difference was a direct reflection of the different ideals and beliefs held by the two schools. For the Theravadins the ideal is the Arahat, who like a Buddha seeks to eradicate suffering and rebirth in Samsara through renouncing the world, and through the eradication of greed, hatred and delusion. This achievement is made possible if one follows the Middle Way and the Noble Eightfold Path as taught by the Buddha Gotama. Nibbana is the Theravadin's final goal and is attainable through the practice of insight. These beliefs and ideals form the subject matter of Theravada Buddhist Art. On the other hand, although the followers of the Mahayana School of Buddhism uphold the goal of Nirvana also and deliverance from endless suffering and rebirth in Samsara, they have a different spiritual hero. Their hero is not the Buddha Gotama, but the Bodhisattva. A Bodhisattva is a kind of divine saviour, whose role is to aid any being desirous of deliverance and Nirvana. In Mahayana Buddhism anyone can become enlightened and renunciation of the world in order to win Arahatship is not absolutely necessary, but the practice of specific rites and rituals and meditations and visualizations is. These spiritual practices will aid the practitioner in purifying the mind and will also attract the help of the Bodhisattva. The Mahayana School recognised the historical Buddha Gotama, the Shakyamuni, but raised him to the level of a god."


Dr Rewata Dhamma aslo attended the Sixth Buddhist Council, in Yangon to establish the Scriptures:


www.bbvt.org.uk/Resident_Monks.asp


"Sayadaw Dr.Rewata Dhamma was born in Myanmar in December 1929 and was brought up in the rural village of Thamangol in the Hanthada District on the banks of the Irrawaddy. Entering the monastery as a young novice, he took full monastic ordination at the age of 20. After studying Theravada Buddhism under several eminent scholar monks, he passed the highest examination in scriptural studies at the age of 23 and was awarded the prestigious title of Sasanadhaja-siripavara dhammacariya in 1953. The following year he was among those helping during the Sixth General Sangha Council held in Yangon to establish the scriptures. In 1956, he went to India to study Hindi and Sanskrit as a state scholar, and then continued to study Indian philosophy and Mahayana Buddhism in Varanasi University."




 




 


Glen, after reading all you have to say and concluding that your meaning and my meaning are essentially the same meaning I will simply bow to you and request that you please excuse my ridiculous arrogance and simply move on.


This is stated with an awareness of the rise and fall of emotional states and the manner in which they provide hue and tone to our perceptions moment by moment. In the final analysis, speaking from within the mundane world the notion of whether one teaching of the Buddha is greater than another is irrelevant. 


There are only two points I wish to offer in reflection of your comments above.


First from the standpoint of the eternal wisdom Law that permeates past, present and future and the ten directions of space, a Bodhisattva and an arhart are no different. Secondly the Buddha is never seen as a God in the Mahayana. Such beings as Amithaba are simply expedient means, emenations of the true Buddha so as to lead all beings to enlightenment.  Here the term true Buddha simply means the wonderful Law.  


The wonderful Law of the Buddha is embbeded in all of the Buddha's teachings. Those who are fortunate to enter the path are truly blessed and can be considered leaders of all mankind. May you achieve true happiness in this life and fortunate circumstances in the next.


In each and every case whether here or across the boundless universe one should never slander the wonderful Law of the Buddha. It is the source of actual liberation and eternal joy for all living beings.


The sutra states, "When the voice-hearers and bodhisattvas hear the Law that I preach, as soon as they have heard one verse, they will all without doubt be certain of attaining Buddhahood. In the Buddha land of the ten directions there is only the Law of the one vehicle, there are not two, there are not three.


 


Gassho.

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 16, 2010 - 3:42AM #55
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788

Etoro:


With Respect


Dr Rewata Dhamma was a truly wonderful man, and gave me an opportunity to turn my life around, when everyone else had turned me down, including the doctors.
 
I have not worked for 20 years because of a hidden disability that I was born with. In 1989, I was hospitalised and treated for a condition which I did not have, whilst systematically facing institutionalised denial for a condition I was born with. Dr Rewata Dhamma, to coin a phrase, stopped the rot, insisted that I receive mental health care, trained a Teacher who is a clinical doctor by profession to train me.
 
The Buddha used the metaphor of a House to describe the person. The House of Bhakta_glenn is not yet built; but the House of Glenn has been demolished. For the last 20 years, we have been 'putting in the foundations' for the building of the House of Bhakta_glenn. For this reason, my postings leave a lot to be desired in the Art of Rhetoric: Theory of Civic Discourse.
 
Dr Rewata Dhamma Trained my Guru and me together for three years. My guru has helped me to discover my Dharma. Whilst we talk of the Dharma as Law, there is also 'Personal Dharma'. This 'Personal Dharma' is one's destiny according to his previous Karma. Within the context of my 'Personal Dharma' I have a specific goal, which is different from what we ordinarily take to be the final goal of Nirvana. Suffice to say that under the auspices of Dr Rewata Dhamma, I am a Bodhisattva-in-Training. My Foundation for my House is the Theravada. But, although I try and focus on the Theravada when I post here, My actual practice is much broader.
 
When I began to meditate, my guru impressed upon me a very valuable lesson:
 
She said: "You have been given a precious human birth for only a human being may become a Buddha, see that you use it".
 
When I was about eighteen, I was walking to the cinema with some friends, I had a kind of a vision. I felt a sense of blurred sight but heard a distinctive voice, which was not mine. It accorded with my Guru's instruction:
 
"Why are you wasting your valuable time?", I was asked.
 
Meditation for me is not just walking or sitting. When I write my posts, they are a form of meditation in action. By focusing on the Theravada, I actually develop my understanding of it in relation to the walking meditation and the sitting meditation. In the time that I have been posting at Beliefnet, I have developed my understanding of the Theravada quite considerably. It is for this rather selfish reason that I write, not to score points in a debate.
 
I respect your sincerity for your study of the Lotus Sutra, and one day, My guru may introduce it to me. But, for the moment, I have given my Teacher my assurance that I will carry out her instructions to the Letter, unless there is a reason why I should refuse. then, we maybe have to talk about it. In the past, I have walked out on her but, we usually overcome these difficulties. Shedding the Ego is not easy.
 
For the moment, she has instructed me to read a very large Puraninc Scripture of 120,000 verses, which is off-topic for this board.  Recently, I completed a practice which developed an understanding of the 'Key to all Mantras'. This Puraninc Text is the 'Essence of the Vedas', Veda means Knowledge, not Religion. From the standpoint of the Theravada, Veda may become the object of Meditation and one may aim to become a Tevijja Arahat:

web.ukonline.co.uk/buddhism/mtinmon4.htm
 
Ariyas
 
(Noble Persons)
 
Dr. Mehm Tin Mon
(Saddhamma Jotikadhaja)
( ' The Essence of Buddha Abhidhamma, 1995)

"There are five types of arahats:



      "(1) Pannavimutta-arahat = one who is emancipated through panna(wisdom),
      (2) Ubhatobhagavimutta-arahat  =one who is emancipated in two ways, namely by arupajjhana and by ariyamagga.
      (3) Tevijja-arahat = one who possesses the three vijjas.
      (4) Chalabhinna-arahat = one who possesses the six abhinnas (supernormal powers),


      (5) Those who do not attain arahatship in the four lower abodes of the five Pure Abodes, but attain arahatship in the highest Pure Abode (i.e., Akanittha)."


Vijja is the Pali word for Knowledge, which in Sanskrit is Veda.


I wish you well in your practice.
 
Bhakta_glenn
 
 
 

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2010 - 2:39PM #56
etoro
Posts: 565

From the standpoint of sheer wisdom, true wisdom and the wisdom of all Buddhas, not teaching of Buddhism or non-BUddhism can surpass the wisdom of the Lotus Sutra. The Lotus Sutra displays in full force, the sheer wisdom that is the souce of wisdom of all Buddhas and that of Shakyamuni Buddha himself. The fact that a school of monks and nuns took their beliefs with them to the southern realm of India and the Island of Sri Lanka and established themselves there does not negate the history of events that have unfolded with respect to the history of events at Nalanda Monastery, the  doctrines of Sarvastivada, Sautrantika or Sutranta, the Cittamatra or Yogacharra, Asanga's Lamp for the Path, of Vasubandhu's Treasury of Manifest Knowledge and his major mahayana treatises including Treatise on the Lotus Sutra, Madhyamaka, the works of Ashvagosha, Nagarjuna,  and his disciples, Aryadeva, numerous others, Treatise of the Middleway, the spread of Buddhism to China, the establishment of the three northern and seven southern schools, the culminating expositions of the Great Teacher Tien Tai of China within a span of 600 years of Chinese Buddhism,  the importation of Buddhism to Japan, the six Nara sects, the realizations of the Great Teacher Dengy of Japan and the most liberating and farthest reaching teaching of them all, the teachings of the Great Japanese sage Nichiren Daishonin. The life activities, accomplishments and doctrinal expositions of these Buddhist spiritual leaders bear their marks upon the historic social development of these nation states. Their fruits of wisdom and insight provide the moral foundations for the cultivation of the philosophicall systems of human rights and social justice that continues to unfold to this very day in these countries.


At a time when the Judeo-Christian world view has waned and lost standing these richly derived atheistic systems of thought provide a deeper understanding of the meaning of human nature and spirituality and we find that the entire world of mankind now seeks these systems of thought for the meanings they provide regarding the true nature of life. 


Some may argue that the southern school of Buddhism also bore its mark upon the Asian world.  But these countries are not the central players of Asia on the global stage and their influences do not have the bearing of such countries as China and Japan. This too is karma. 


The nature of these matters, the influence that teachings of wisdom have in the development of a nation-state were well understood even thousands of years ago when the rulers of these nations would seek to import Buddhist teachers so as to develop greater influence over their subjects and citizens and bring greater harmony to their societies. One of the most influential of all Buddhist doctrines is entitled "A Record of the Western Region" where a great monk by the name of Tsuan Tsang traveled from China to India for a period of nineteen years in search of a deeper understanding of the state of the Buddhist philosophy across the West Asian border lands and Indian sub-continent. He returned with a detailed account of the state of Buddhism in numerous Indian states where in some cases Buddhism was being oppressed and under attack or where it was being praised and exalted and used to govern the society, where hinayana was practiced, where mahayana was being practiced and where a mixture of both was being practiced. This doctrine gives us a snap shot of the state of Indian Buddhism in the sixth century India.  Such doctrines had a huge influence in China and especially later in Japan in the assessment of which of the teachings of Buddhism had greater or lesser meaning and influence. 


In one of his famous writings entitled "Teaching, Capacity, Time and Country" Nichiren explains the significance the status of a nation-state has on the spread and influence of Buddhism.


One must never fail to take into
account the kind of country in which
one is spreading the Buddhist teachings.
There are cold countries, hot countries,
poor countries, rich countries, central
countries, and peripheral countries,
large countries and small countries,
countries wholly given over to thieving,
countries wholly given over to the
killing of living things, and countries
known for their utter lack of filial piety.
In addition, there are countries wholly
devoted to the Hinayana teachings,
countries wholly devoted to the Mahayana
teachings, and countries in which
both Hinayana and Mahayana are pursued.
In the case of Japan, therefore, we
must carefully consider whether it is a
country suited exclusively to Hinayana,
a country suited exclusively to Mahayana,
or a country suited for the practice
of both Hinayana and Mahayana.
Fifth is the sequence of propagation.
In a country where the Buddhist teachings
have never been introduced, there
of course will be none who are familiar
with Buddhism. But in a country
where Buddhism has already been introduced,
there will be those who believe
in the Buddhist teachings. Therefore,
one must first learn what kind of Buddhist
doctrines have already spread in a
particular country before attempting to
propagate Buddhism there.
If the Hinayana and provisional Mahayana
teachings have already spread,
then one should by all means propagate
the true Mahayana teaching. But if
the true Mahayana teaching has already
spread, then one must not propagate
the Hinayana or provisional Mahayana
teachings. 


The Teaching, Capacity, Time,
and Country, WND V.1, pg51


 


 


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 11, 2010 - 5:49PM #57
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788

Etoro:


Whilst Theravada Buddhism is the oldest School of Buddhism, it is a relative late-comer to the Western World.


It Teaches a qualitative Dhamma, rather than a quantitative one.


How many Arahants will it take to enable the Dhamma to take root in the West?


One.


The Buddha and His Teachings

by

 Venerable Narada Mahathera



The First Messengers of Truth (Dhammadūta)

"The Buddha who, before long, succeeded in enlightening sixty disciples, decided to send them as messengers of Truth to teach His new Dhamma to all without any distinction. Before dispatching them in various directions He exhorted them as follows: [5]

""Freed am I, O Bhikkhus, from all bonds, whether divine or human.

""You, too, O Bhikkhus, are freed from all bonds, whether divine or human.

""Go forth, O Bhikkhus, for the good of the many, for the happiness of the many, out of compassion for the world, for the good, benefit, and happiness of gods [6] and men. Let not two go by one way: Preach, O Bhikkhus, the Dhamma, excellent in the beginning, excellent in the middle, excellent in the end, both in the spirit and in the letter. Proclaim the Holy Life, [7] altogether perfect and pure.

""There are beings with little dust in their eyes, who, not hearing the Dhamma, will fall away. There will be those who understand the Dhamma."

""I too, O Bhikkhus, will go to Uruvelā in Senānigāma, in order to preach the Dhamma."

""Hoist the Flag of the Sage. Preach the Sublime Dhamma. Work for the good of others, you who have done your duties." [8]

"The Buddha was thus the first religious teacher to send His enlightened ordained disciples to propagate the doctrine out of compassion for others. With no permanent abode, alone and penniless, these first missioners were expected to wander from place to place to teach the sublime Dhamma. They had no other material possessions but their robes to cover themselves and an alms-bowl to collect food. As the field was extensive and the workers were comparatively few they were advised to undertake their missionary journeys alone. As they were Arahants who were freed from all sensual bonds their chief and only object was to teach the Dhamma and proclaim the Holy Life (Brahmacariya). The original role of Arahants, who achieved their life's goal, was to work for the moral upliftment of the people both by example and by precept. Material development, though essential, was not their concern."


In Theravada Buddhism, material development is the concern of the Householders, for themsleves and for the Sangha, in the form of Dana, alms. It is the duty of a Householder to earn a Right Livelihood, to support himself, his family and the Sangha, who Guard and Dispense the Dhamma, the Word of the Buddha.


The Code of Dicispline for the Householders may be found in the Singala Sutta.


Members of the Sangha and the Householders may become Arahants.


 


 


 


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 12, 2010 - 9:36AM #58
vacchagotta
Posts: 298

Dec 25, 2009 -- 3:45AM, Karma_yeshe_dorje wrote:



My friend, an atheist, reckoned that everyone does some of those sins. And he thought the punishments depicted were grossly excessive for the crimes. In particular, he said that this was not at all his conception of a middle path of compassionate Buddhism!

I understand that prosocial behaviours might be encouraged. And I have long ago visited a display of such hells in Singapore. Also I have come across the Wheel of Life image.

Yet my friend and I considered the violence of the imagery to itself constitute depravity! I thought this work was culturally inappropriate for Australia. Yes of course we have social problems. But I recall from a public safety campaign that consumers of propaganda reacted badly to negative, violent imagery!

This artwork reminded me of historical excesses such as the Spanish Inquisition and witch-burning. And my friend said it was hypocritical to try to stamp out torture by torturing torturers!






Depiction or description of hells is a a very old tradition in Buddhism, attributed to the Buddha himself even in the Pali Nikayas. 

If I may take the liberty knowing that I could be wide of the mark, I think the assumption of your atheist friend, in keeping with his philosophy, is that the doctrines of a religion are entirely the inventions of its adherents, and that if Buddhists describe hell realms in their sacred texts or in artwork based on such, that this must be attributable to their own psychology alone rather than as proceeding from a revealed truth.  This would tend to bias his view towards the feeling that such descriptions come from a latent tendency towards violence and that hells are explainable as a human wish-fulfillment for vengeance and mayhem.  But for many Buddhists, hell realms are viewed as potentially very real, and the Buddha was teaching us about a danger.  A danger he did not invent but wanted beings to realize and avoid because they can avoid it.  This is compassionate on the part of the Buddha!

In any case, horrible things do happen to beings in our own realm let alone hells.  The Buddha's teaching is about how to avoid such suffering, and ultimately how to be utterly free of any suffering.  I disagree with the notion that treating such subjects artistically, even when explicit, necessarily entails depravity and violence in itself.

in friendliness,
V.

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 22, 2010 - 5:37PM #59
etoro
Posts: 565

Mar 12, 2010 -- 9:36AM, vacchagotta wrote:

Dec 25, 2009 -- 3:45AM, Karma_yeshe_dorje wrote:

  My friend, an atheist, reckoned that everyone does some of those sins. And he thought the punishments depicted were grossly excessive for the crimes. In particular, he said that this was not at all his conception of a middle path of compassionate Buddhism!  I understand that prosocial behaviours might be encouraged. And I have long ago visited a display of such hells in Singapore. Also I have come across the Wheel of Life image.  Yet my friend and I considered the violence of the imagery to itself constitute depravity! I thought this work was culturally inappropriate for Australia. Yes of course we have social problems. But I recall from a public safety campaign that consumers of propaganda reacted badly to negative, violent imagery!  This artwork reminded me of historical excesses such as the Spanish Inquisition and witch-burning. And my friend said it was hypocritical to try to stamp out torture by torturing torturers!




Depiction or description of hells is a a very old tradition in Buddhism, attributed to the Buddha himself even in the Pali Nikayas.    If I may take the liberty knowing that I could be wide of the mark, I think the assumption of your atheist friend, in keeping with his philosophy, is that the doctrines of a religion are entirely the inventions of its adherents, and that if Buddhists describe hell realms in their sacred texts or in artwork based on such, that this must be attributable to their own psychology alone rather than as proceeding from a revealed truth.  This would tend to bias his view towards the feeling that such descriptions come from a latent tendency towards violence and that hells are explainable as a human wish-fulfillment for vengeance and mayhem.  But for many Buddhists, hell realms are viewed as potentially very real, and the Buddha was teaching us about a danger.  A danger he did not invent but wanted beings to realize and avoid because they can avoid it.  This is compassionate on the part of the Buddha!   In any case, horrible things do happen to beings in our own realm let alone hells.  The Buddha's teaching is about how to avoid such suffering, and ultimately how to be utterly free of any suffering.  I disagree with the notion that treating such subjects artistically, even when explicit, necessarily entails depravity and violence in itself.  in friendliness, V.



MY friends, all ten realms of existence are the inherent nature of the universal mind as manifest effects of causes in a state of ignorance or enlightenment. Hell entails the tormenting of the mind, the body and the environment which includes others.  That which we call "this realm" is mutally possessed of all other realms by virtue of the workings of the one mind.


In the Lotus Sutra the Buddha tells Shariputra,


"But stop, Shariputra, I will say no more. Why? Because what the Buddha has achieved is the rarest and most difficult-to-understand Law. The true entity of all phenomena can only be understood and shared between Buddhas. This reality consists of the appearance, nature, entity, power, influence, inherent cause, relation, latent effect, manifest effect, and their consistency from beginning to end."


 


In the prior chapter the Buddha can be seen displaying the true nature of the mind as a prerequisite to preaching the true aspect of the mind. 


 


At that time the Buddha emitted a ray of light from the tuft of white hair between his eyebrows, one of his characteristic features, lighting up eighteen thousand worlds in the eastern direction. There was no place that the light did not penetrate, reaching downward as far as the Avichi hell and upward to the Akanishtha heaven.

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