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5 years ago  ::  Jul 13, 2009 - 1:07PM #1
Beckaj75
Posts: 10

I will try to make a long story short I do not have a car so when I go to church I often go with a friend to a nondenominational wonderful congregation that is very "ecumenial" in it's worship style and strongly supports unity among the wider body of Christ.


But because I do not always get to go every Sunday I have been looking for a church /congregation  in my area I can attend more frequently but I don't really know where I "belong"


 I can't just go to the church I normally go to with my friend because it is in a different city about 20 -25 miles away from where I live.


I am looking for a church that stresses Christian Unity(Brotherhood/love/fellowship/working together) Places emphasis on Holy Communion/Eucharist, and welcomes those who have what may be percieved as "liberal" views politically and theologically


For instance I oppose abortion as a means of birth control but support abortion under certain circumstances. I support the seperation of church and state. I believe Jesus is the Son Of God and part of the Godhead but a distinct essence from Father God.


I could go on but that gives you some idea


 


so any suggestions???


any places I should stay away from?

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 14, 2009 - 9:28AM #2
KatherineOrthodixie
Posts: 3,689

" am looking for a church that stresses Christian Unity(Brotherhood/love/fellowship/working together) Places emphasis on Holy Communion/Eucharist, and welcomes those who have what may be percieved as "liberal" views politically and theologically


For instance I oppose abortion as a means of birth control but support abortion under certain circumstances. I support the seperation of church and state. I believe Jesus is the Son Of God and part of the Godhead but a distinct essence from Father God."


Pretty much any of the mainstream Protestant church would fit the bill, though I'm not altogether sure what you mean by "liberal" views politically and theologically since that seems rather to be painting with a fairly wide brush. In my experience and observation, "liberal" and "conservative" when used in a religious context are so poorly defined/understood as to be meaningless in any practical sense.

“The Law of the Church is to give oneself to what is given not to seek one’s own.” Fr. Alexander Schmemann
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 14, 2009 - 12:09PM #3
Beckaj75
Posts: 10

thanks I guess I use the term because I am surrounded by people in my family that are fundametalist/biblical literists theologically and very conservative politically and  they are always saying I am too liberal.


 


I agree that labels do not always paint an accurate or complet picture but I was just trying to be brief and use familiar words.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 14, 2009 - 2:02PM #4
KatherineOrthodixie
Posts: 3,689

Have you tried an Episcopal or Lutheran church? They tend to take liturgy and the sacraments very seriously indeed, but are both active in social issues.

“The Law of the Church is to give oneself to what is given not to seek one’s own.” Fr. Alexander Schmemann
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 16, 2009 - 6:59AM #5
tawonda
Posts: 4,367

I agrree. I'm in the ELCA, and I think you'd fnd an ELCA congregation a happy church home. Ditto an Episcopal church.


I'm only marginally familiar with the Disciples of Christ, but while I think their worship is less formal than Lutheran and Anglican worship services, they do place a great emphasis on Communion and in fact celebrate Communion every week. They too are considered a mainline denomination.

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5 years ago  ::  Jul 16, 2009 - 3:58PM #6
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

While I would think that any mainline Protestant church could work for you, You sound like the Disciples of Christ might be a good fit for you. Not that I am biased or anything, being  DOC minister and all that Cool  One of the main things that characterise us is a deep commitment to Christian unity. It is our "Polar Star" as one early leader put it. Christian unity is written in our Disciple DNA, we like to say.


Also, we celebrate communion every Sunday. It is so important to us that our denominational logo features a red Chalice with the cross of St. Andrew in white. Some have interpreted the cross to be "shouldered", taken up as we follow Jesus.


Chalice

You are unique.
Just like everybody else.
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5 years ago  ::  Jul 29, 2009 - 4:15PM #7
Brobrooz1
Posts: 847

Beckaj- you might check out the Episcopal church in your area. Although conservative, I have found a wecome church home with a lot of diversity. I particularly enjoy the liturgical worship and the fact that 'thinking' is valued. www.episcopalchurch.org/visitors.htm

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5 years ago  ::  Aug 04, 2009 - 6:10PM #8
Bob_Bennett
Posts: 916

Jul 14, 2009 -- 12:09PM, Beckaj75 wrote:


thanks I guess I use the term because I am surrounded by people in my family that are fundametalist/biblical literists theologically and very conservative politically and  they are always saying I am too liberal.


 


I agree that labels do not always paint an accurate or complet picture but I was just trying to be brief and use familiar words.


 




 


Without a car, you are limited to churches within bus or bicycle distance.   You might look at any church that the rest of your family would look down upon.

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5 years ago  ::  Aug 24, 2009 - 12:37AM #9
spudette
Posts: 959

Beckaj75: since you don't seem to be committed to a particular denomination, I'd like to suggest that you try to find the church home whose teachings are the most closely in accord with the Word of God as revealed in the Bible. If you'd like to this, I can help you. The best way to do this is to study the Word of God for yourself without allowing yourself to be influenced by anyone except god. If you pray that He show you His Truth, he will do just that. Remember: "Seek, and you shall find, ask, and it shall be given to you, knock, and the door will be opened to you." If you wish, we can study together. Just send me an email.


God bless you. 

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5 years ago  ::  Aug 26, 2009 - 5:07PM #10
Campbellite
Posts: 2,068

Aug 24, 2009 -- 12:37AM, spudette wrote:


The best way to do this is to study the Word of God for yourself without allowing yourself to be influenced by anyone except [G]od.




This is, of course, complete nonsense.


It is impossible to study the Scriptures without any outside influence except God. (God deserves a capital "G", BTW.)


For starters, the Bible itself is the product of the Church, the community of the Faithful. It, unlike, say, the Quran, didn't just fall out of the sky. It is impossible to read and study and understand the Bible outside the context of the Church which produced it.


Second, it is the very heighth of hubris to think that you alone are the very first person in the history of forever to come to the Bible. If you genuinely want to understand it, you must read, not only the Bible, but comentaries and essays and sermons and other works by the countless Christians who have come before you. Faithful people who, like you, come to these pages for wisdom and insight.

You are unique.
Just like everybody else.
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