Post Reply
Page 2 of 2  •  Prev 1 2
Switch to Forum Live View Turning Toward Unitarian Universalism
5 years ago  ::  Sep 05, 2009 - 2:23PM #11
KittyMcConkie
Posts: 31

Hi Ranger Rover,


UU Congregations can be very different & their approach to finances may vary significantly.  In our congregation we ask new members to pledge 1% or 2% of their income when they become new members, unless there are special circumstances.  New members may speak with our minister or the chair of finances.  So, it depends on your financial circumstances.  We have several people who pledge $100 or $200 for their annual pledge.  We also have long time members who pledge $5000 to $7500, annually.  Don't let money, or lack of, determine if you would like to become a member.  Your presence to work on your own spiritual path with others is more important. 


You may like to attend services for several months to determine if this is what you want in your spiritual life.  The value of participating with others who are like-minded (and/or like-hearted) is the beauty of membership in a UU Congregation.


 Welcome!  Good luck on your path.  Kiitty McConkie

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Sep 13, 2009 - 10:31PM #12
Kimrdhbsms
Posts: 181

Each UU congregation decides for itself if there is a financial requirement for membership and what that is.  Some do have requirements, some don't.  and, as it says above, they're flexible. 


the services also vary a lot, not only from one congregation to another, but from one Sunday to another.  Many UU churches give their minister the summer off, so summer services are less formal, and often less "religious" than during the rest of the year.  Most services have various points where we light candles, sing hymns or other songs, listen to sermons or homilies.  The sermons are often like lectures, but not always.  We have a few special services during the year: a "flower communion" often in the spring, a "water communion" in the fall, a holiday pageant of some sort.  Flower communion is my favorite: everyone brings a flower and puts it in the big arrangement, and at the end of the service, everyone takes a different flower.  It's symbolic of sharing the beauty and renewal of spring, etc.  Water communion involves bringing a few drops of water (real or symbolic) from our summer travels and adding them to the communal bowl.  Again, not all congregations do these since every congregation decides for themselves, but many do them. 


Our congregation announces the name or number of people killed in war this week, and lights a candle for peace.  It's not political, it's our version of a prayer for peace and respecting and acknowledging the dead. 


There's often a brief children's story -- or "story for all ages" as we call it -- after which the kids usually exit to attend Sunday School or Children's Chapel or something. 


We have both a choir and a children's choir.  They make jokes about UUs singing badly because we are reading ahead to see if we agree with the words....


There's often good music.  Moments of meditation.  And then there's coffee hour.  (they also joke about UUs worshipping the coffee pot....)


I hope that gives you some idea of what the services are like, though you really just have to go and try several (because they vary a lot)

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Jan 29, 2010 - 9:40PM #13
Shatnerian
Posts: 4

Just thought I'd check back. Thanks for all your comments. They're very helpful. I finally made the decision to become a member of my local church so I emailed the minister and asked about becoming a member. I realized that I'd actually been going to the place for two years and have been getting to know some of the members.


Of course, as my luck would have it, I'm out of town during the next Pathway to Membership so taking that next step will have to wait.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Jan 30, 2010 - 6:29AM #14
Ralph.m
Posts: 159

Jan 29, 2010 -- 9:40PM, Shatnerian wrote:


Just thought I'd check back. Thanks for all your comments. They're very helpful. I finally made the decision to become a member of my local church so I emailed the minister and asked about becoming a member. I realized that I'd actually been going to the place for two years and have been getting to know some of the members.


Of course, as my luck would have it, I'm out of town during the next Pathway to Membership so taking that next step will have to wait.




I just saw this thread, and noticed that the path I am on is remarkably similar to yours, since I became an atheist, and certainly do not fit in any sort of traditional religious community. Except in my case, my wife continued on as a Christian -- and after our compromise of getting married in the United Church didn't work for either of us, she went back to Catholicism, while I started fleshing out my thoughts on atheism and secular humanism. We have a teenage son, who refused Confirmation in the Catholic Church, but otherwise is not much interested in sorting out his own spiritual beliefs for now.


In the last few years, I started trying to become active as a secular humanist; I joined the Center For Inquiry, attended local atheist/humanist meetups, and became active on atheist forums.  Over the last year, it has dawned on me that there is a problem with direction that atheist and/or humanist groups are heading.  They seem to be moving towards some sort of secular fundamentalism, condemning any sort of collaboration with theists of any sort; proclaiming that religious beliefs are delusions, and must be eradicated. For some reason, I get a lot of indignation and outrage from atheists who insist that atheist fundamentalism is a logical fallacy and impossible, whenver I have tried to  point out the similarities between this kind of thinking, and religious fundamentalist movements. The biggest problem is that they are either totally unwilling or unable to do any kind of self-examination of their own beliefs and motivations.


Anyway, I quit CFI, atheist forums and atheist networking hubs like Atheist Nexus and Think Atheist, and followed a friend's advice to drop in at the local Unitarian Church.  I noticed a few weeks ago that a couple of U/U church members were giving a talk on atheism, so I especially interested in finding out if it was true that atheists could find a welcome at there. I was surprised to discover that, when a show of hands was called, that approximately 20% of us in attendance that Sunday consider themselves atheists;  so, I've gone back the last two Sundays and my wife is considering coming along also to see how she likes it.  It would be nice to have a church that we can both get something out of belonging to! 


The Unitarian/Universalist Church puts a lot of stress on the importance of social action -- it seems to be a religion based more on what you do, and how you conduct yourself, than on what you believe in.


Almost forgot! While I was looking around, I took the Belief-O-Matic poll. My results indicate that U/U is the closest match I would find in any religious community:


 

Secular Humanism (100%)
2.  Unitarian Universalism (92%)
3.  Liberal Quakers (84%)
4.  Theravada Buddhism (81%)
5.  Neo-Pagan (71%)
6.  Nontheist (67%)
7.  Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (66%)
8.  Taoism (63%)
9.  New Age (57%)
10.  Mahayana Buddhism (53%)
Quick Reply
Cancel
4 years ago  ::  Feb 09, 2010 - 3:18PM #15
Syzygy
Posts: 2

Hello Everyone!


I'm interested in the U U and am thinking of attending a service. So, what's it really like?


How can so many of different walks of life with so many different beliefs come together as a whole?


 

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 2 of 2  •  Prev 1 2
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook