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6 years ago  ::  May 01, 2009 - 3:14PM #1
Solidgranit.com
Posts: 305

What particular pagan belief system do you (meaning any pagan) adhere to?


Sumerian/baylonian/assyrian/hittite, Greco-Roman, Norse, Celtic, ect.

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6 years ago  ::  May 02, 2009 - 9:09AM #2
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

Solidgranit,


I was going to ask you if you wanted this thread transferred from where you originally posted the topic in the Discuss Paganism board as the latter is 'traditionally' for debated subjects. As you are already here, I have removed the thread in the Discuss Paganism board.


C.H.
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6 years ago  ::  May 02, 2009 - 9:37AM #3
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

"Inquiring into the various different belief systems out there has always interested me, so I ask as many are pagans, which pagan tradition or at least gods/goddesses do all of ya'll follow? Sumerian/baylonian/assyrian/hittite, Greco-Roman, Norse, Celtic, ect."


The Earth-based Forum does tend to be more focused on the modern 20th century Paganism Movement, which as you may already be aware isn't 'a' belief system or faith in itself although the Movement does have established modern faiths that are considered to also be Pagan such as Wicca or other Pagan Witchcraft Traditions.


Participants of existing Reconstructionist religions such as the traditions you mentioned are usually more comfortable with the term heathen than pagan and those forums can be found through this link community.beliefnet.com/go/forum/view/43...


It has been a practice since the 70's for individual self-identifying Pagans and/or some Pagan faiths to seek relationships with deities that are often from across global pantheons. Hopefully doing so respectfully and with sufficient research though that isn't always the case.


I know you were hoping for specific/personalised responses from Pagans rather than a 'lecture-toned' overview. I can only respond in part. I am a modern Pagan from the Dianicism faith, which is women-only, goddess-only in definition. It is one of the faiths evolving out of the Women's Spirituality Movement (60's-now) that also identifies within the 20th century Paganism Movement. Dianicism is not the Dianic Tradition of the Religion of Wicca although there are shared historical roots nor is Dianicism related to Old Dianic Witchcraft though the name originated in part back in the 60's with this religion.


That's the part I can comment on. The Tradition that I follow within Dianicism has a modern pantheon but beyond that high-level information, I remain Oath-bound.


So a bit of a response. It has been a bit slow since the last move around here but hopefully other Pagans around will pop in.


C.H.


 

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6 years ago  ::  May 02, 2009 - 3:30PM #4
gorm-sionnach
Posts: 1,663

I'm one of those Reconstructionists CH mentioned, a Celtic Recon (specifically of the Fálachus tradition, which is a Gaelic Reconstructionist Polytheist). So I focus on Irish mythology and folk traditions.


Complicated no? The link CH provided will bring you to the other recon/ heathen boards, but they are generally slow right now, even the CR board has been slow as of late.


 

Truth in our hearts, Strength in our arms, Fulfillment in our tongues.
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6 years ago  ::  May 03, 2009 - 3:26AM #5
Solidgranit.com
Posts: 305

Uh, if ya'll wish to more the thread, its fine with me, I suppose disscuss paganism would be more accurate.  Ionly realize the diffeences recently, so sorry.  Part of the reason I ask is because I am a history major and I think to see  what people believe is interesting.  Pagan religions are a bit foreign to me so they hold a certain 'flavor' of interest.

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6 years ago  ::  May 03, 2009 - 9:28AM #6
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

Solidgranit,


Thread is good where it is right now.


Are you aware that there is a mythological history of 'modern' Paganism and a documented history?


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6 years ago  ::  May 05, 2009 - 2:25AM #7
Solidgranit.com
Posts: 305

Very little, doesn't it go back to the 70s?

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6 years ago  ::  May 05, 2009 - 7:43PM #8
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

Solidgranit,


"Very little, doesn't it go back to the 70s?"


Depends what you mean by 'it'.


What I perceive to be a modern Paganism Movement began to coalesce circa 1930's in England but that Movement has roots/sources in a number of other Movements in Europe/Britain as well as from folklore, archaeological and academic speculation, legends and myths. For example, there was an earlier Paganism Movement circa 17th century (though some influential writings were earlier) which was an academic rebellion against the hold of Catholicism in Europe. One of the writers who published pseudo-histories for example was Jules Michelet, whose books put forth 'facts' such as there being a suppressed ancient religion called paganism whose priestesses were witches. He was not the only writer whose works were used later as 'historical references' and which contributed to the mythological history so entwined with the actual history that is documented. There was also a flourishing occult fiction genre in Europe from which motifs and themes continued to be popularised. The term paganism (originally from a Latin word) has a longer etymological history that again factors into these sources.


Modern Paganism was conceived notably in Britain and Europe from the 30's through 50's, exported to North America by the 60's and back to Britain by the 70's and so on. However what is meant by Paganism can differ across a broad spectrum (hence perceiving it as a Movement) with established religions and traditions of those religions and/or individual self-defined practices that tend to be eclectic and unique.


Might I ask what 'very little' you were aware of?


C.H.

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6 years ago  ::  May 06, 2009 - 2:26AM #9
Solidgranit.com
Posts: 305

In a nutshell, wicca.  most of the 'paganism' that I have been exposed to is what I thik is better called 'new age'.  I love ancient history so that I why I ask about these different pagan religions. 

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6 years ago  ::  May 06, 2009 - 8:07AM #10
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

Solidgranit,


 "In a nutshell, wicca.  most of the 'paganism' that I have been exposed to is what I thik is better called 'new age'.  I love ancient history so that I why I ask about these different pagan religions"


Well there were no pagan ancient religions only ancient religions that were labelled or that we today label as pagan for various reasons. IMO.


There is also a great deal labeled as Wicca that isn't relevant to that Religion but directly or indirectly, Wicca has a pivotal influence on the modern Paganism Movement. I use an overlapping circle analogy. Draw a small circle. This is Wicca as it was conceived to be in the circa 30's to 50's in Britain. Having a documented history, definable, evolving into various Traditions with recognisable core beliefs.


Now draw a larger circle that just overlaps the first. This is what became the Paganism Movement and what also evolved when the basics (not the oathbound information) was published first in books and then on the Net. When Wicca and hence modern Paganism spread to most English-speaking countries. A lot of beliefs etc became author-defined as being Wiccan and/or Pagan. Modern Paganism remains a spectrum, undefinable as a solitary or recognisable religion in itself. Within Wicca, Solitary practitioners began to outnumber the possiblity of proper teachers. The Religion (Wicca) was conceived to be practiced in covens and while every coven member remains a solitary practititioner in personal practices, the idea of the self-taught, book-taught solitary was not originally part of this faith. Also within the second circle are the non-Wiccan Pagan Witchcraft Traditions directly or indirectly influenced by Wicca. I belong in that part of the spectrum, within the Feminist or Dianic Witchcraft religions that emerged from the late 60's to now notably in North America. Now people can craft profound relationships to the Divine and establish strong personal 'traditions' as Pagans and/or Wiccans within this second circle. It takes work, commitment and time to do so.


Then draw a third circle, just overlapping the second but not the first. This is where IMO the Neo-Wicca 'traditions' belong that are barely or not recognisable as such, New Agey type Paganism, crystal-ladies, sparkle-dolphins, white-lighters and 'witchcraft is the most ancient religion in the world' 'Pagans' usually fit. These folks tend to be passing through a phase or co-opting a trend, rebelling against something, don't have faiths that can actually be taught to or shared with anyone else or that work all that well for them when life gets bumpy.


In the first circle, the mythological and actual history tend to support each other, inspire without conflicting due to study and having a strong foundation of faith.


In the second circle, the mythological history is usually what is 'known' and serious practititoners have to do their homework to figure out the actual and how these fit together.


In the third circle, the mythological history - especially the flamboyant bits - are usually all that resonate and actual history is dismissed as irrelevant.


In my observations anyway and being a history geek myself since I was a kid.


C.H.

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