Post Reply
Page 1 of 3  •  1 2 3 Next
Switch to Forum Live View Episcopal? Muslim Priest
5 years ago  ::  Mar 25, 2009 - 3:00PM #1
slate
Posts: 225

I read about a female Episcopal priest who is, or claims to be, also a Muslim.  A bishop of the church has asked for her resignation.  As of now, I have not heard that she has resigned.What are your thoughts about this?

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 25, 2009 - 3:10PM #2
ALLTOGETHER
Posts: 1,094

Peace,


I don't see any problem with it.  To really understand "religions", one can take claim to more than just one faith... Husband and wife can be considered "one", yet they are two seperate individuals.   Why are we so hung up on dividing our" religions" into so many differences??  We are one people!, Why not a combination of being one "religion" with many parts (paths)?????????


Peace, Wardah

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 25, 2009 - 4:53PM #3
NothingButLove
Posts: 715

Mar 25, 2009 -- 3:00PM, slate wrote:


I read about a female Episcopal priest who is, or claims to be, also a Muslim.  A bishop of the church has asked for her resignation.  As of now, I have not heard that she has resigned.What are your thoughts about this?




The Islamic teachings are based on "Natural Love". They too seek to improve themselves by careful living, just as all who follow the Ten Commandments do. In essence there is no spiritual difference between Islam and that sort of Christianity. But within Christianity can be found a different thread, that which I understand to be Jesus real teachings, and that is not present in Islam. The "born again" folks are the best known folks trying to avail themselves of that teaching, even if, IMHO they don't know how to achieve it. That teaching is about soul transformation or rebirth, due to an energy or spirit that God provides.


So, to answer the question. If you are a follower of Natural Love, there would be no conflict at all. But I would see Islam as limited.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 12:17AM #4
newmuslimlady
Posts: 176

This lady needs to make up her mind on what religion she belongs to and follow one or the other.  Christianity and Islam are very different.  Islam believes in "One" God in very form of the word "One" and Christianity believes in a God that is three in one.   If you believe in the trinity, you can't be a Muslim.  Also Muslims don't believe anyone has or will die for their sins.  We are responsible for our sins but can be forgiving by the mercy of God and by asking for forgiveness.   We also believe in the laws sent by God as mankind needs laws to live by.  Even Jesus said, "Think not that I came to take away from the laws and the Prophets."  Just like a country or a city needs laws for people to follow to keep things from lawlessness, man needs laws to keep him morally in check. 


NewMuslimLady/actually Muslim for almost 6 yrs. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 4:49AM #5
ALLTOGETHER
Posts: 1,094

Each individual is blessed with the ability to make choices..  It is that person's right to be able to make her or his own personal choices.  It is no body else's business what their choices are.  There is only one God..  


I remember once hearing that persons are born Muslim; it's after we get into certain societies that we are taught to be different. 


I feel that it is the same in that no one has the right to determine who is Muslim or determine who is not Muslim...  I feel that that is determined by God alone!


Please, let us respect each other's choices. 


Peace, Wardah 

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 1:16PM #6
grampawombat
Posts: 269

ALLTOGETHER wrote "I remember once hearing that persons are born Muslim." I was born Christian, baptized when I was about six weeks old. What I mean by that is that I was part of a community that took being Christian for granted. I have known many people who recite the Nicene Creed without paying much attention to what it says. I've known others who see it as a statement of community or solidarity, without necessarily accepting it as a statement of fact. I have the impression that this lack of adherence to specific dogmas is not that unusual in other faiths as well.


But why an Episcopal priest would say she has "become a Muslim" is at the very least unusual and curious. I wonder, really, what it is about Islam that she finds so compelling. I will try to find out more about her, because I'm curious myself.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 1:31PM #7
grampawombat
Posts: 269

I found out a bit more about our Muslim Episcopal sister. Her name is Ann Holmes Redding, and she is on the staff of  St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral in Seattle. She has been a priest for more than 20 years, and a Muslim for the last 15 months. She says that she was "drawn to the faith after an introduction to Islamic prayers left her profoundly moved."


The article from a Seattle newspaper quotes an Evangelical Christian scholar as saying that "There are tenets of the faiths that are very, very different." But Redding, who will be a visiting assistant professor at Seattle University this fall, observes that: "I am both Muslim and Christian, just like I'm both an American of African descent and a woman. I'm 100 percent both." And the article infers that other scholars (progressive, no doubt), state that, "depending on how one interprets the tenets of the two faiths, it is, indeed, possible to be both."

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 2:21PM #8
ALLTOGETHER
Posts: 1,094

Peace,


My point about being born Muslim includes a specific definition of Muslim.  We are not born claiming any particular "religion".  It is put to or upon us by our parents or by the society in general.  Notice that many people follow the "religion" of their parents or the "religion" of the marority of peoples in their birth society. 


To be able to choose one's "religion" or way of life comes later on in life, also, whether one remains in the faith of their parents... is an individual choice. 


I do not believe that a person has to be One or the Other, but has the choice to enjoy or express  their feelings to/in/for more than just one "religion... 


I just read a poem by Robert Frost titled:The Road Not Taken  I liked it...


In many "religions we are taught to fear the "other" and declare that we are right and that all others are wrong.  WHY??????


Peace, Wardah

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 27, 2009 - 6:28PM #9
Geocorona
Posts: 302

It is quite possible to be a Christian and a Muslim, if you don't believe in the perfection of either spiritual text.


I've always found it hypocritical for someone to decry idolatry in one breath and proclaim the perfect holiness of a book in the next breath.


Still, she should resign the priesthood, because while it may be possible to be a Christian and a Muslim, I doubt it's possible to be an Episcopalian and a Muslim.

Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2009 - 4:13AM #10
Merrill48
Posts: 108

If the lady in question were simply a perosn in the pew, there would be no problem at all. I spent the first 40+ years of my life in the Episcopal Church, and as most who post on this board realize, TEC is pretty tolerant. In fact, if you go to a large TEC congregation and ask around, you will probably find parishoners in the pews who have been strongly influneced by many other faith traditions - Islam, Judiaism, Eastern religions, and even Paganism.


However, when one is a priest of the chruch, one is held to a higher standard of belief and at least professed adherence to church teachings. While there is much overlap between Islam and Christianity because of their "Abrahamist" roots, the central teachings of the Christian faith (of any "flavor") - the divinity of Jesus and his death on the Cross for our sins and his subsequent resurection, for example - are not compatible with Islam. As a priest, she can't have it both ways. She must be either a Christian or a Muslim.


My $0.02 - please adjust for your local currency...


Shalom,


Merrill


 

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 1 of 3  •  1 2 3 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook