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Switch to Forum Live View Where do you see Sympathetic Magic being used?
6 years ago  ::  Mar 07, 2009 - 12:28PM #1
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244
Sympathetic magic is one of the oldest and widespread ‘types’ of magical practices, based on the principle that a relationship between A and B can cause A to influence B or visa versa.

Keeping in mind that there is a difference between the deliberate and unknowing application of sympathetic magic as a magical practitioner, does anyone else see the principle of sympathetic magic as being instrumental in how (unknowingly) the following function?

Stock market
Fashion industry
Home renovation business
Auto industry
Advertising
Movies and TV
Food marketing
Health and Wellness Industry
Tourism


C.H.
No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 1:46PM #2
samhainautumnwood
Posts: 666

I don't practice magick personally, but by my understanding wouldn't all magick be considered sympathetic to some extent?


 


The interconnectedness of all things makes an action to change/modify one aspect will have ripple effects even if unintended on everything else.


 


Kinda makes one pause to seriously consider the consequences of one's actions whether magickal or mundane...


 


 

peace,

samhain autumnwood.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 1:55PM #3
Joyville2
Posts: 158

Sam,


I am in agreement that all actions ripple out in some small or huge way, as we are all connected.  It does make me realize that what I do, what I think, does matter. I think that fact that I know this allows good thoughts and actions come from me and I don't really have to think about it...they just come through me in a good way somehow.


Namaste, Suzy


 

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 3:42PM #4
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

 


Samhain,


To some extent, all magic relates at some level to being sympathetic. However in some cases, it is more direct obvious or applicable than others.


Let me approach my initial question slightly differently. Does anyone consider the following claims/observations to relate back to the basic principle of sympathetic magic?



"Our most prestigious clients have bought these mutual funds. Imagine what will happen to your money if you do."


(envision) A glossy magazine page with a model elegantly dressed in an expensive restaurant, being kissed by an equally elegantly dressed and ruggedly handsome young man. Below is emblazoned the name of a fashion designer.



(envision) Another glossy magazine page of a kitchen with designer cabinetry, top of the line appliances, the beginning preparations of a gourmet meal on the center island as if someone about to cook had just left the picture. Below is the name of the custom kitchen manufacturer.


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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 3:43PM #5
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

 


Suzy,


Thank you for taking the time to post your comment to Samhain.


I'm not sure exactly how to relate your experience to the original question of whether these areas of modern society function on the principle of sympathetic magic. If you could explain further, it would be much appreciated.


C.H.

No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 4:39PM #6
Ursyl
Posts: 462

Now that I see some examples to clue my tired brain in, I see this all too often.


In fact, we discussing this with the girls in the scout troop Friday night at our overnight. The ads try to make you think that if you buy the product, you'll also be as popular or pretty or happy as the kids in the ad.

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 5:06PM #7
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

 


Yes! Very aptly put!


If A buys B, then possessing/wearing/using B will influence A by providing whatever the underlying message that is being promised (success, wealth, health, sex, etc) overtly or subliminally.


C.H.

No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 15, 2009 - 5:31PM #8
samhainautumnwood
Posts: 666

Mar 15, 2009 -- 5:06PM, CreakyHedgewitch wrote:


Yes! Very aptly put!


If A buys B, then possessing/wearing/using B will influence A by providing whatever the underlying message that is being promised (success, wealth, health, sex, etc) overtly or subliminally.


C.H.




 


Now I understand what you're talking about Creaky.


My "favorite" ones (to laugh at) are the ads with bikini clad girls selling power tools (the girls aren't even wearing eye or hearing protection for crying out loud).


I don't know if their intent is to suggest if the guy buys the skill saw then bikini clad women are going to be all over him, or just simply using the girl as "bait" to draw the male's attention.


(we males are simple creatures, really. No need for subtlety with us).


 

peace,

samhain autumnwood.
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6 years ago  ::  Mar 16, 2009 - 12:01AM #9
Feinics
Posts: 2,539

Im a bit confused with the original question, (my m.e. has me extremely fuzzy brained this week so forgive me)


Is it that, by buying into the advertising ploys that sympathetic magic occurs or that such industries exploit the fact that a product often represents more in our head then merely the item?


I think we often aren't just buying a product, we are buying into an idea or desire. The advertising, movie and other such industries  tap into and exploit, our insecurities and desires to sell an idea or product. I don't think buying into the lifestyle that adds try to sell us, makes us anymore likelier to be richer, prettier, smarter or happier, probably the opposite quite unhappy as we strive for unrealistic ideals instead of being happy with and appreciating who we are .


If we take the example of hair dye, with the image of a successful rich and beautiful model or actress. I buy the dye, perhaps somewhat subconsciously, in the hopes of achieving what it represents, being beautiful, attractive, rich, famous etc..  I don't  believe that if I buy the hair dye I'l look like the girl in the ads, eva langoria or jennifer aniston or any other celebrity spokesperson for the product. (Nor do I believe for a second any of those actresses stand over a sink wearing plastic gloves giving themselves a DIY dye job..but thats a whole other matter altogether..). If I did believe and bought every product thrown at me with this image/lifestyle attached,  I still wouldn't look like them and while like may attract like I doubt very much I'd be a hollywood actress, living in a mansion with a millions of quid sitting in my bank account.


Seem to be rambling a bit so il stop before i confuse myself further. I don't think I'm talking about exactly what you meant CH sorry.


 

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6 years ago  ::  Mar 17, 2009 - 8:11AM #10
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244

Feinics,


You got it and already figured it out as well.


IMO The principle (rather than the deliberate invocation) of sympathetic magic is used to sell just about anything. Buy this car, your life will be as exciting as the life the actor hired is portraying. Buy the latest designer (knock-off) dress and a bit of the success/money/glamour of those who can afford the real thing will come home with you too. Use this box of hair dye and you too will be as lovely as the model on the box cover... a modern 'spell' to chang one's hair colour as it were.


Some years ago, I remember reading about the summit meeting of American advertisers after WWII who 'invented' obsolescent consumerism (the buy-replace-buy cycle) in order to get the economy jump-started and rebuild after the war. In the decade that followed with notably the aid of TV, ads appeared for example about the 'happy housewife' whose happiness was jump-started by using all the latest products.


C.H.


 

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