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6 years ago  ::  Oct 29, 2008 - 9:55PM #1
gorm_sionnach
Posts: 237
This will be more of an issue to those of you who, like me, follow an Irish leaning path. How important is something like the Dindsenchas to your understanding of Irish mythology? Especially when compared to sources which tend to receive more focus, such as the "Second battle of mag Turied", or the "Conquests of the sons of Mil". How do you decide which source to use, in the case where one contradicts the other?
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 31, 2008 - 11:27PM #2
Kay404
Posts: 174
[QUOTE=gorm_sionnach;859550]...How do you decide which source to use, in the case where one contradicts the other?[/QUOTE]

Hi, Gorm Sionnach

One of the things I’ve experienced a lot through my shamanic practice is that sometimes things that seem to contradict each other are not so much contradictory as they are talking about things from different angles, or on different levels, or from different ‘worlds’ (“this world” aka “ordinary reality” being one world and “other world” “land under wave” etc., aka “non-ordinary reality” being different ‘worlds’). 

But to give an answer from a different angle…  when old sources disagree, I tend to think about several things that might affect the content:  who the translator was;  whether the old sources might have come from different regions, each with its own slightly different versions; which ones are the oldest; which ones might have older sources that can be inferred – for instance, in my Celtic Study Circle we haven’t studied the Dindshenchas yet, so I googled the word.  One source said “…many placenames appear which had fallen out of use by the 5th century A.D., when Irish written records began to appear in quantity.”  To me, that suggests that although the version we have was first written down in the 12th century, it may contain verses that were part of the oral tradition going back before the 5th century. 

Another thing I think about when reading things that seem contradictory is whether they might both have been perceived as valid or true by ancient Celts.  I also like to find out what respected experts in the field think.  And when I and others in my study circle have read and thought about these things, and discusssed them among ourselves, we often will go into Otherworld, in shamanic spirit journey, to ask the spirits what they think about it.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 31, 2008 - 11:57PM #3
gorm_sionnach
Posts: 237
First, thanks for posting, I've been having a bit of difficulty trying to drum up posts here, though many people seem to be lurking around.

That sounds like an excellent methodology to me. Keeping in spirit with the Celts enjoyment of obstufication.:D
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