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Sticky: Good UU Books
6 years ago  ::  Oct 09, 2008 - 5:40PM #21
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,832
Ahhh, well, in that case, you probably won't think the Cup of Comfort series does what you're wanting. It's more along the Chicken Soup lines than a thoughtful parable-like story such as an Aesop's fable. You're obviously wanting more substance than I discerned initially.

Hmmmm...looking in the sections for major religions in a bookstore will likely work better for you as it would be difficult to order from Amazon without being able to browse the book in order to be sure it's not too shallow.

Caroline Kennedy's Family series collections may offer some possibilities, but these tend to be more timetold favorites of good literature rather than presenting a moral. Just good classical stories and poems, though.

I do think that you may find some suitable pieces in the UUA's meditation manuals. Check the UUA Bookstore online under the section on meditation as it's not how to meditate but rather books of meditative pieces, the majority of which are deeper than anything Chicken Soup (the National Enquirer of inspirational short pieces, IMO...just icky) offers.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 09, 2008 - 9:21PM #22
thelovesower
Posts: 97
[QUOTE=DotNotInOz;814812]Ahhh, well, in that case, you probably won't think the Cup of Comfort series does what you're wanting. It's more along the Chicken Soup lines than a thoughtful parable-like story such as an Aesop's fable. You're obviously wanting more substance than I discerned initially.

Hmmmm...looking in the sections for major religions in a bookstore will likely work better for you as it would be difficult to order from Amazon without being able to browse the book in order to be sure it's not too shallow.

Caroline Kennedy's Family series collections may offer some possibilities, but these tend to be more timetold favorites of good literature rather than presenting a moral. Just good classical stories and poems, though.

I do think that you may find some suitable pieces in the UUA's meditation manuals. Check the UUA Bookstore online under the section on meditation as it's not how to meditate but rather books of meditative pieces, the majority of which are deeper than anything Chicken Soup (the National Enquirer of inspirational short pieces, IMO...just icky) offers.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for your advice!
I checked UUA bookstore and Amazon. Amazon does have the UUA's meditation manuals. Well, they are actually cheaper, and I can take advantage of Free Shipping. I ordered them

About real-life Chicken Soup style stories, I forgot mentioning that there is a story in 2nd volume of Chicken Soup about geese.

I really like this story although it is moralized thoroughly. It's an observation about geese. In case someone doesn't know, here's the observation:

[QUOTE]
Next fall, when you see geese heading south for the winter, flying along in 'V' formation, you might consider what science has discovered as to why they fly that way. As each bird flaps its wings, it creates an uplift for the bird immediately following. By flying in 'V' formation, the whole flock adds at least 71 percent greater flight range than if each bird flew alone.

People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going with greater ease and speed, because they are traveling on the thrust of those next to -- and before us.

When a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the drag and resistance of solo flight -- and quickly returns to the formation to take advantage of the lifting power of the birds in front.

If we have as much sense as a goose, we'll chose to stay in formation with those headed the same direction we are.

When the head goose gets tired, it rotates back in the wing and another flies point.

It is sensible to take turns doing demanding jobs.

Geese honk from behind to encourage those in front to keep up their speed.

What messages do we give when we honk from behind?

Finally, and most importantly, when a goose gets sick or is wounded by gunshot and falls out of formation, two other geese fall out with the injured, following it down to lend help and protection. They stay with the fallen goose until it is able to fly or until it dies; and only then do they launch out on their own or with another fomation to catch up with their group.

If we have the sense of a goose, we'd stand by each other like this.[/QUOTE]

Reading this story again helps me tolerate earth-based worship pagans more. I watch some inspirational clips from the Earth-Based priestess in beliefnet. Although she looks quite weird to me, her insights are good.

I think it's time for me to practice spirituality in the real world besides parables from the ancient world. Learning from animals will be ideal because they are more connected to Nature than we are.

I watch White Fang, Lassie Come Home, Air Bud, etc. They are really inspirational about animal love. However, they are fictional. I hope I can find something real.

Two months ago, I searched on the Internet and found the article about dolphins rescued surfer Todd Endris from sharks. Although this is just news and doesn't teach spirituality like A SENSE OF A GOOSE, I personally find a lession of altruism and cooperation in it.

I just attended the animal blessing in my church last Sunday. IT was very wonderful. I have realized that I should pay more attention to our beloved creatures since then.

Can you give me some suggestions how to learn more about animal behavior, how they save people, how they treat each other, heroic deeds they do, etc. Any book, web site? I read Chicken Soup For Pet Lover's Soul and Cat and Dog lover's soul. Stories were great. I guess these are Chicken Soup books that are less shallow than others. It seems like people have more real emotion when they talk about pets.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 11, 2008 - 2:19AM #23
thelovesower
Posts: 97
By the way, Dot

In another topic, Former Christian, you mentioned you used to be a Catholic. That reminds me of the story of saint Francis, saint Pheri (I'm not sure the spelling) in the Book Of Virtues. I also read story about saint Patrick and some Celtic parables in the book Celtic Parables: Stories, Poems and Prayers of Robert Van de Weye.

I have to admit with you that while I don't like Roman Catholic's theology and the church doctrine, I can't say bad things about folktales or stories in Catholic traditions.

Because I am a Unitarian now, reading legends or folktales about Catholic saints or Christmas stories is like reading the gospels. I don't have to pray with those "saints", but I can look at what they did and follow their religion of kindness, faith, and compassion, just like I try to follow religion of Jesus.

Since you were a Catholic, you probably know some books that have stories or legends about saints, Christmas/Easter stories, parables, ordinary life stories in Catholic tradition. It will be great if you can help me look for those books. Thank you!
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 11, 2008 - 10:39AM #24
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,832

As you may be aware, most of the "life stories" of saints before the Middle Ages are mostly or entirely myths or legends. There's some exciting stuff in some of those...virgins burned alive rather than renouncing their faith, stalwart Christians being devoured by lions and such in the Coliseum, that sort of thing. My Confirmation patron saint was St. Agnes, a virgin martyr who chose death rather than marry a Roman soldier who admired her beauty and demanded that she marry him or die painfully. I forget how she died, but it was sufficiently gruesome to entice a 10-year-old to choose her. LOL The stories of St. Cecilia, patron saint of music, and St. Catherine of the "catherine wheel," a torture device named for her since she died on it, are similarly ghoulish.


But hey, there's a certain amount of appeal and drama to more modern saints such as St. Bernadette of the famous Lourdes apparitions or St. Therese of Lisieux, both of whom died excruciatingly painfully of tuberculosis. St. Thomas More, of course, chancellor of England until Henry VIII got mad at him and had him beheaded for refusing to go along with Henry's wanting a divorce from Catherine of Aragon.


Afraid I can't recommend any specific titles as the one I have is likely long out of print. The lives of saints book I have was compiled by a John Crawley. It's a nice one for adults, containing all of the major saints. I had a really pretty picture book of saints when I was a kid but my mom used it for her children's ed classes at church after I'd outgrown it, so it's long gone. Don't recall anything specific about it, but I'm sure that if you google for that sort of thing, you'll find any number of lovely kids books. The Catholic publishers do an excellent job of producing attractive and colorful books for kids.

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4 years ago  ::  Dec 17, 2009 - 10:15AM #25
Jessa
Posts: 6

For a brief overview and history of UU, I would suggest the Unitarian Universalist Pocket Guide.  It's an itty-bitty little short book, and cover everything you would need to know as a beginner.  Also, I loved, loved, loved a book called "Everyday Spiritual Practice".  It's by multiple UU authors.  I have read it several times, and I always come back to it when trying to accomplish some sort of spiritual practice.  

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4 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 9:04PM #26
amy
Posts: 1

i'm reading "being liberal in an illiberal age" by jack mendelsohn. its excellent.

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4 years ago  ::  Sep 30, 2010 - 8:04PM #27
RevDorris
Posts: 1,795

"Reflections from the Heart." Volume One. For those of you who read this message -- this volume is now available at ... www.createspace.com/3481868 at a 20% discount. Use discount code: 5EKUWS5Y.

With love,

Rev Dorris
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3 years ago  ::  Mar 26, 2011 - 7:42PM #28
Truth27
Posts: 523

Hi All,


FYI ...


Warren Ross's 'The Premise and the Promise' provides (typically) little-discussed historical context for our consolidated denomination (1961).  We have as good a history as any other tradition (if not better).  I don't quite understand why we feel the need to totally downplay that part of ouselves ... Are most of us recovering dogmatists afraid we'll 'relapse' if we even get close to 'going there'?  ...


 


I'd also recommend the book 'Serving with Grace: Lay Leadership as a Spiritual Practice' by Erik Walker Wikstrom.  Our tradition is CONGREGATION-led.  However, if we all grew up in traditions in which 'church' meant passively doing whatever the clergy-hierarchy said we should do, many of us don't know what to do with ourselves when the ball is suddenly 'in our court' with respect to how the community should be run (hence, we needlessly default to the passive patterns of our childhood) ... Plus, many spiritual traditions suggest that life isn't worth living without challenge/exertion.  So, whilen many folks groan in pain at the idea of having to face the grunt work of getting along with others for a common goal (a la flashbacks of work-situations, etc), 'Serving with Grace' reminds us that doing so in the service of our UU tradition/principles is DIFFERENT from everyday committee work; it helps make the world a better place.  It's, therefore, THE spiritual work we're seeking ...


 


Blessings,


Kweli

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2 years ago  ::  Dec 21, 2011 - 4:36PM #29
RevDorris
Posts: 1,795

We now have 4 Books Listed on Amazon.




The Great Tao -- A Commentary.




www.amazon.com/Great-Tao-Rev-Robert-Dorr...




Reflections from the Heart Vol. 2




www.amazon.com/Reflections-Heart-Rev-Rob...




Reflections from the Heart




www.amazon.com/Reflections-Heart-Rev-Rob...





A Unitarian Perspective




www.amazon.com/Unitarian-Perspective-Rev...


With love,

Rev Dorris
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10 months ago  ::  Jul 10, 2013 - 11:29AM #30
RevDorris
Posts: 1,795

"Talking Points" -- A Forbidden Wisdom is available on Amazon and Kindle.


Author:  Rev. Dr. Robert E. Dorris

With love,

Rev Dorris
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