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Switch to Forum Live View Anger during meditation
6 years ago  ::  Sep 04, 2008 - 9:27PM #1
tpandrews
Posts: 8
The other day I was reading the thread about crying during meditation and it got me thinking about some of my own experiences. I've never cried during meditation, but I have had some odd emotional experiences. It's happened on a few occasions where I've become so happy and joyful that it became uncomfortable and maybe would have lead to tears had I not pulled myself out of it, but more often than that the case has been the feeling of anger and aggitation. There is never any object to go with the anger, at least not at first...I'm just angry. Eventually my mind finds something to be angry about, but the emotion always comes first. Most of the time I try to just sit with it, but it doesn't last very long at all. I always end up having to get up and go for a walk or do something physical to blow off the steam.  I don't know that I'm looking for a solution here. I think I'm just more curious as to wether or not anyone else has had similar experiences and what they've done in that situation.
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 04, 2008 - 9:27PM #2
tpandrews
Posts: 8
The other day I was reading the thread about crying during meditation and it got me thinking about some of my own experiences. I've never cried during meditation, but I have had some odd emotional experiences. It's happened on a few occasions where I've become so happy and joyful that it became uncomfortable and maybe would have lead to tears had I not pulled myself out of it, but more often than that the case has been the feeling of anger and aggitation. There is never any object to go with the anger, at least not at first...I'm just angry. Eventually my mind finds something to be angry about, but the emotion always comes first. Most of the time I try to just sit with it, but it doesn't last very long at all. I always end up having to get up and go for a walk or do something physical to blow off the steam.  I don't know that I'm looking for a solution here. I think I'm just more curious as to wether or not anyone else has had similar experiences and what they've done in that situation.
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 13, 2008 - 4:47AM #3
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 788
[QUOTE=tpandrews;741999]The other day I was reading the thread about crying during meditation and it got me thinking about some of my own experiences. I've never cried during meditation, but I have had some odd emotional experiences. It's happened on a few occasions where I've become so happy and joyful that it became uncomfortable and maybe would have lead to tears had I not pulled myself out of it, but more often than that the case has been the feeling of anger and aggitation. There is never any object to go with the anger, at least not at first...I'm just angry. Eventually my mind finds something to be angry about, but the emotion always comes first. Most of the time I try to just sit with it, but it doesn't last very long at all. I always end up having to get up and go for a walk or do something physical to blow off the steam.  I don't know that I'm looking for a solution here. I think I'm just more curious as to wether or not anyone else has had similar experiences and what they've done in that situation.[/QUOTE]

When you meditate, do not try to suppress your anger, just let it be. When meditating, you will experience all kinds of emotions. Whatever your emotional state, just try to be aware of the breath. this can be done by observing the movement of the abdomen whilst breathing in and out. Alternatively you can focus your attention on the sensation at the tip of the nose. When anger arises, breath faster than your normal breathing rate:

As you breath in, take three short in-breaths and mentally say in - in - in
When you breath out give three short out-breaths and mentally say out - out-out.

Thus in in in out out out.

Alternatively, when anger arises, try walking meditation:

http://www.buddhanet.net/xmed7.htm

Insight Meditation can be practised by sitting or walking but, generally. in my own experience, I have been taught to use Walking Meditation for the development of Samadhi (Concentration)
And Sitting Meditation for the the development of Vipassana (Insight aka Wisdom)

The movement of walking Meditation has one mental component and five bodily components:
1 Volition Intention to walk (Mentally Walking Walking Walking )
2 Raising the foot (Raising Raising Raising)
3 Moving the raised foot forward (Forwarding Forwarding Forwarding)
4 Lowering the foot (Lowering Lowering Lowering)
5 Touching the ground with the foot (Touching Touching Touching)

With practice, a meditator can dispense with mentally saying these movements whilst performing them and just be aware of them but, being aware of volition, catching the intention to walk as it arises in the mind is a subtle skill but realisable with practice.

Anger is a hindrance to the development of Samadhi, concentration and thus, is a hindrance to meditation. The deliberate practice of patience is the antidote to anger. The benefit of practising patience is that it allows a meditator to accomplish all things in Buddhist practice both in the present and in the future, it leads to the attainment of Arahantship.

In order for Gotama to become a Buddha, he had to develop Ten Perfections. Patience is the Sixth Perfection. The Buddha's way of practising them is given in The Jataka Tales but there is a far more practical way of developing Patience. The Ninth Perfection is Metta (Loving Kindness), it is one of the four Brahma Viharas and as such is both Selfless ans Supramundane, transcendental.

In short, Metta is beyond the scope of Analysis and can stand alone as a complete Path to Buddhahhod.

From the formula: The Selfless, Loving Mind is Patient, the Vipassana Insight arises intuitively that the Practice of Metta Meditation can destroy anger and develop Patience. Your anger is a Teacher for you.

Buddhism Teaches Four Kinds of Protection in Mental Training aka Meditation:

http://www.mahamakuta.inet.co.th/english/b-way(13).html
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6 years ago  ::  Sep 14, 2008 - 6:01PM #4
Gerald_ford
Posts: 34
Pretty much hit it right on the head.  Over one's lifetime, people accumulate a bizarre array of mental habits and suppressed ideas that have a weird way of surfacing when the mind is still.  These basically don't mean much, it's just like clearing out the closet and discovering a jacket you wore 8 years ago (and looks tacky).  Instead, the key is to focus on your breath, or just be aware of what's going on.

If you're aware, if you're mindful, then you don't get off track.  When meditating, or doing anything else, just ask yourself, "what am I doing now", or "am I really sitting here?" or "am I really walking", etc.

Best wishes!
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