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7 years ago  ::  Jan 23, 2008 - 10:38PM #1
tameless_heart
Posts: 2,084
A lot of people come here asking questions about what to read. What can we offer?

Personally I'd say:

1. Mythology
and um....

hmm....what else can you all offer?
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 23, 2008 - 10:45PM #2
Sacrificialgoddess
Posts: 9,496

tameless_heart wrote:

A lot of people come here asking questions about what to read. What can we offer?

Personally I'd say:

1. Mythology
and um....

hmm....what else can you all offer?





Let's see here.  Hutton's Triumph of the Moon and Stations of the Sun for history. 
Lipp's Elements of Ritual as a starting point for, well, ritual.
Graves' The White Goddess after reading Triumph of the Moon, because the book has been so important to pagan history, but in many ways it is so very wrong.

That's all I got that's not Wicca specific at the moment.  Anyone else?

Dark Energy. It can be found in the observable Universe. Found in ratios of 75% more than any other substance. Dark Energy. It can be found in religious extremists, in cheerleaders. To come to the conclusion that Dark signifies mean and malevolent would define 75% of the Universe as an evil force. Alternatively, to think that some cheerleaders don't have razors in their snatch is to be foolishly unarmed.

-- Tori Amos
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 12:24AM #3
tameless_heart
Posts: 2,084
What about...(although it's fairly suspect) Drawing Down the Moon, hmm...
Ah, although it's not pagan, I reccommend Grandmother's Secrets. It's about the femine spirit expressed through sacred dance, particularly belly dance. On that note, Sacred Women Sacred Dance...
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 8:45AM #4
Sacrificialgoddess
Posts: 9,496

tameless_heart wrote:

What about...(although it's fairly suspect) Drawing Down the Moon, hmm...
Ah, although it's not pagan, I reccommend Grandmother's Secrets. It's about the femine spirit expressed through sacred dance, particularly belly dance. On that note, Sacred Women Sacred Dance...





Drawing Down the Moon has a few problems, but overall, I think Adler gave us a pretty good piece of journalism there.  Yes, definitely worth a read.  Can't say to the others; haven't read them.  But I will have to add them to my list!

Dark Energy. It can be found in the observable Universe. Found in ratios of 75% more than any other substance. Dark Energy. It can be found in religious extremists, in cheerleaders. To come to the conclusion that Dark signifies mean and malevolent would define 75% of the Universe as an evil force. Alternatively, to think that some cheerleaders don't have razors in their snatch is to be foolishly unarmed.

-- Tori Amos
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 10:57AM #5
Feinics
Posts: 2,539
I recently read wyevens wentz's"The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries".
(Fairy in this case been distinguished from the little barbie dolls with wings view)
Its interesting reading and includes oral accounts from native people that may otherwise have been lost.
That being said its clearly written from a foreigner who enjoyed the romanticised version of people sitting beside the turf fires telling tales while an attempt is made with is being done in a scientific anthropological fashion so it has to be read in context (as with most books:)) but worth a read.
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 12:41PM #6
tameless_heart
Posts: 2,084
Here is Drom's list of literature for kids:

Native American
Right After Sundown - Maberg
Sage Smoke - Heady & Stewart

Finnish
The Magic Storysinger - McNeil

Egyptian
The Myth of Isis and Osiris - Cashford

Celtic
Gilly Martin the Fox - Hunter
The Tangle Coated Horse - Young (no pictures, a normal book, retelling and recombining)

Norse
Norse Myths - Crossley-Holland
Odin's Family - Philip

Various
Marduk the Mighty - Matthews
Journeys Through Dreamtime - Ganeri & Morris
The Golden Mare, the Firebird and the Magic Ring - Sanderson
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 3:47PM #7
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244
“Paganism, An Introduction to Earth-Centered Religions” by Joyce & River Higginbotham

“Being A Pagan, Druids, Wiccans and Witches Today” by Ellen Evert Hopman and Lawrence Bond (their university thesis, mainly interviews)

“Contemporary Paganism, Minority religions in a Majoritarian America” by Carol Barner-Barry (just got this one, haven’t read it yet)

“Voices from the Pagan Census, A National Survey of Witches and Neo-Pagans in the United States” , Helen A. Berger, Evan A. Leach and Leigh S. Shaffer. (2003)

“Her Hidden Children, The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America” by Chas S. Clifton

“Pagan Pathways, a Guide to Ancient Earth Traditions” by Graham Harvey and Charlotte Hardman (another new acquisition although the title doesn’t reassure me as to its historical accuracy)

“Contemporary Paganism, Listening People, Speaking Earth” by Graham Harvey

“The Paganism Reader” edited by Chas S. Clifton and Graham Harvey

“Witchcraft and the Web, Weaving Pagan Traditions Online” by M. Macha NightMare

“Modern Pagans, An Investigation of Contemporary Pagan Practices” (Interviews by V. Vale and John Sulak)

“Exploring the Pagan Path, Wisdom from the Elders” (numerous authors)

“A History of Pagan Europe” by Prudence Jones and Nigel Pennick

“The Earth Path” by Starhawk   (observations from her decades of experiences in the Neo-/Paganism Movement)

History Recommendations as well:

Ronald Hutton’s other two books in his series along with “Triumph of the Moon”
(1st book) “The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles, Their Nature and Legacy”, rather dry but well researched.
(3rd book) “The Stations of the Sun, a History of the Ritual Year in Britain” which investigates the historical origins of the modern Sabbats (amongst others)
And his next book,
“Witches, Druids and King Arthur” which deal with some of the outstanding questions left out of TOTM. 

“Christianity and Paganism in the Fourth to Eighth Centuries” by  Ramsey MacMullen,  historical research about how what has been broadly labeled as ancient paganism within the Roman Empire transitioned and enriched a Christianised Europe.

C.H.
No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 9:47PM #8
sam_i_am
Posts: 42
A wonderful list creaky. Where is a good starting point? Gimme 2 to start with. I''ve copied the list for later reference. Thanx a bunch
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 24, 2008 - 11:19PM #9
tameless_heart
Posts: 2,084
Start at teh top and work your way down! :D
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6 years ago  ::  Jan 25, 2008 - 8:25AM #10
CreakyHedgewitch
Posts: 1,244
[QUOTE=sam_i_am;238875]A wonderful list creaky. Where is a good starting point? Gimme 2 to start with. I''ve copied the list for later reference. Thanx a bunch[/QUOTE]
Sam,

I would suggest starting the Triumph of the Moon to give you an historical perspective to interpret the others.

The second book perhaps depends on what you are most interested in exploring. If it is history, then try one of those I referenced or the Pennick book, for example.  If you are interested in the modern evolution of paganism, try perhaps Clifton or the census book or Nightmare's book. If you want to explore the diversity of the past 70 years,  try one of the books with the interview format.

Availability may also determine what you can start with.

C.H.
No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.
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