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Flag tameless_heart January 23, 2008 10:38 PM EST
A lot of people come here asking questions about what to read. What can we offer?

Personally I'd say:

1. Mythology
and um....

hmm....what else can you all offer?
Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 23, 2008 10:45 PM EST

tameless_heart wrote:

A lot of people come here asking questions about what to read. What can we offer?

Personally I'd say:

1. Mythology
and um....

hmm....what else can you all offer?





Let's see here.  Hutton's Triumph of the Moon and Stations of the Sun for history. 
Lipp's Elements of Ritual as a starting point for, well, ritual.
Graves' The White Goddess after reading Triumph of the Moon, because the book has been so important to pagan history, but in many ways it is so very wrong.

That's all I got that's not Wicca specific at the moment.  Anyone else?

Flag tameless_heart January 24, 2008 12:24 AM EST
What about...(although it's fairly suspect) Drawing Down the Moon, hmm...
Ah, although it's not pagan, I reccommend Grandmother's Secrets. It's about the femine spirit expressed through sacred dance, particularly belly dance. On that note, Sacred Women Sacred Dance...
Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 24, 2008 8:45 AM EST

tameless_heart wrote:

What about...(although it's fairly suspect) Drawing Down the Moon, hmm...
Ah, although it's not pagan, I reccommend Grandmother's Secrets. It's about the femine spirit expressed through sacred dance, particularly belly dance. On that note, Sacred Women Sacred Dance...





Drawing Down the Moon has a few problems, but overall, I think Adler gave us a pretty good piece of journalism there.  Yes, definitely worth a read.  Can't say to the others; haven't read them.  But I will have to add them to my list!

Flag Feinics January 24, 2008 10:57 AM EST
I recently read wyevens wentz's"The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries".
(Fairy in this case been distinguished from the little barbie dolls with wings view)
Its interesting reading and includes oral accounts from native people that may otherwise have been lost.
That being said its clearly written from a foreigner who enjoyed the romanticised version of people sitting beside the turf fires telling tales while an attempt is made with is being done in a scientific anthropological fashion so it has to be read in context (as with most books:)) but worth a read.
Flag tameless_heart January 24, 2008 12:41 PM EST
Here is Drom's list of literature for kids:

Native American
Right After Sundown - Maberg
Sage Smoke - Heady & Stewart

Finnish
The Magic Storysinger - McNeil

Egyptian
The Myth of Isis and Osiris - Cashford

Celtic
Gilly Martin the Fox - Hunter
The Tangle Coated Horse - Young (no pictures, a normal book, retelling and recombining)

Norse
Norse Myths - Crossley-Holland
Odin's Family - Philip

Various
Marduk the Mighty - Matthews
Journeys Through Dreamtime - Ganeri & Morris
The Golden Mare, the Firebird and the Magic Ring - Sanderson
Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 24, 2008 3:47 PM EST
“Paganism, An Introduction to Earth-Centered Religions” by Joyce & River Higginbotham

“Being A Pagan, Druids, Wiccans and Witches Today” by Ellen Evert Hopman and Lawrence Bond (their university thesis, mainly interviews)

“Contemporary Paganism, Minority religions in a Majoritarian America” by Carol Barner-Barry (just got this one, haven’t read it yet)

“Voices from the Pagan Census, A National Survey of Witches and Neo-Pagans in the United States” , Helen A. Berger, Evan A. Leach and Leigh S. Shaffer. (2003)

“Her Hidden Children, The Rise of Wicca and Paganism in America” by Chas S. Clifton

“Pagan Pathways, a Guide to Ancient Earth Traditions” by Graham Harvey and Charlotte Hardman (another new acquisition although the title doesn’t reassure me as to its historical accuracy)

“Contemporary Paganism, Listening People, Speaking Earth” by Graham Harvey

“The Paganism Reader” edited by Chas S. Clifton and Graham Harvey

“Witchcraft and the Web, Weaving Pagan Traditions Online” by M. Macha NightMare

“Modern Pagans, An Investigation of Contemporary Pagan Practices” (Interviews by V. Vale and John Sulak)

“Exploring the Pagan Path, Wisdom from the Elders” (numerous authors)

“A History of Pagan Europe” by Prudence Jones and Nigel Pennick

“The Earth Path” by Starhawk   (observations from her decades of experiences in the Neo-/Paganism Movement)

History Recommendations as well:

Ronald Hutton’s other two books in his series along with “Triumph of the Moon”
(1st book) “The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles, Their Nature and Legacy”, rather dry but well researched.
(3rd book) “The Stations of the Sun, a History of the Ritual Year in Britain” which investigates the historical origins of the modern Sabbats (amongst others)
And his next book,
“Witches, Druids and King Arthur” which deal with some of the outstanding questions left out of TOTM. 

“Christianity and Paganism in the Fourth to Eighth Centuries” by  Ramsey MacMullen,  historical research about how what has been broadly labeled as ancient paganism within the Roman Empire transitioned and enriched a Christianised Europe.

C.H.
Flag sam_i_am January 24, 2008 9:47 PM EST
A wonderful list creaky. Where is a good starting point? Gimme 2 to start with. I''ve copied the list for later reference. Thanx a bunch
Flag tameless_heart January 24, 2008 11:19 PM EST
Start at teh top and work your way down! :D
Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 25, 2008 8:25 AM EST
[QUOTE=sam_i_am;238875]A wonderful list creaky. Where is a good starting point? Gimme 2 to start with. I''ve copied the list for later reference. Thanx a bunch[/QUOTE]
Sam,

I would suggest starting the Triumph of the Moon to give you an historical perspective to interpret the others.

The second book perhaps depends on what you are most interested in exploring. If it is history, then try one of those I referenced or the Pennick book, for example.  If you are interested in the modern evolution of paganism, try perhaps Clifton or the census book or Nightmare's book. If you want to explore the diversity of the past 70 years,  try one of the books with the interview format.

Availability may also determine what you can start with.

C.H.
Flag Treegoddess January 25, 2008 1:08 PM EST
I'm reading Starhawk's "The Earth Path" right now...meh...it's ok, but I have to take her books as I can, she's one of those people that everyone either hates or loves.  *shrug*

I have "A History of Pagan Europe" actually on the way from Amazon right now. 

The other books that I'm reading are more witchcraft/wiccan books and not pagan.
Flag Treegoddess January 25, 2008 1:08 PM EST
I'm reading Starhawk's "The Earth Path" right now...meh...it's ok, but I have to take her books as I can, she's one of those people that everyone either hates or loves.  *shrug*

I have "A History of Pagan Europe" actually on the way from Amazon right now. 

The other books that I'm reading are more witchcraft/wiccan books and not pagan.
Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 26, 2008 10:31 AM EST
[QUOTE=Treegoddess;240350]IThe other books that I'm reading are more witchcraft/wiccan books and not pagan.[/QUOTE]

Starhawk writes from within the mind-set of Women's Spirituality and/or Dianic Paganism (regardless of what she calls it) so what one gets from her depends on what mind-set and perspective the reader has.

I know what you meant by your last sentence within the context of this thread but for those who read htis thread and might be confused by your statement,  (Pagan) Witchcraft and Wicca are and remain also Pagan.  This sentence alludes to books that are focused on Pagan Witchcraft and/or the Religion of Wicca and that do not address Paganism in a more generalised or generic focus.

C.H.
Flag Feinics January 26, 2008 9:24 PM EST
anyone got a good list complied of witchcraft books that arent wicca orientated! I know its a tall order, wiccas influence not withstanding but iv spent hours trawling online for new books to feed the brain, with little success and im fed up of getting excited by a title only to read the blurb and find im on a wild goose chase. Anyone fancy saving me the trouble...:)
Flag lexa_blue January 27, 2008 4:46 AM EST

Feinics wrote:

anyone got a good list complied of witchcraft books that arent wicca orientated! I know its a tall order, wiccas influence not withstanding but iv spent hours trawling online for new books to feed the brain, with little success and im fed up of getting excited by a title only to read the blurb and find im on a wild goose chase. Anyone fancy saving me the trouble...:)



Sure, Ruthy, I'll bite:D.  These are my favorite fairly non-Wiccan witchy books, although you've probably read at least a few of them.

Off the top of my head:
*Scott Cunningham's books on stones, herbs, and aromatherapy are personal favorites (but then, he was an early favorite Pagan author of mine)
*Dorothy Morrison: Everyday Magic, Moon Magic, Sun Magic, Utterly Wicked (new book on curses--even if you view it as unethical, it's still a good read)
*Ellen Dugan: Natural Witchery
*Yasmine Galenorn: Embracing the Moon (fyi, she specifically states in this book that she is not Wiccan

Again, most of these are pretty well-known; but they're pretty non-Wiccan.  I'm at work right now, but I'll look at my bookshelf when I get home and see if I've missed anything.

Blessings,
Lexa

Flag Treegoddess January 27, 2008 6:56 AM EST
Thanks C.H., you're right, I worded that strangely!  :)

I'm reading Garden Witchery right now too, it's a lovely book by Ellen Dugan (who has a Wiccan background but considers herself a Garden Witch).  It's a gardening book (obviously!) :p
Flag lexa_blue January 27, 2008 7:17 AM EST
Garden Witchery is TOTALLY what I meant!:p
Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 27, 2008 11:34 AM EST
There are certainly many traditions of witchcraft that are not Wiccan such as the indigenous, the fictional or the mythic that either predate or are contemporary with the modern Wiccan definition of witchcraft.

Non-Wiccan as a label also does tend to be applied to the spectrum of autonomous Pagan Witchcraft Traditions that evolved outside of the Religion of Wicca in the last 80 years or so. Since these were not and are not part of that Religion of Witchcraft, this label is accurate….to a point.

The problem is that all these autonomous Pagan Witchcraft Traditions have been influenced directly or indirectly by Gardner’s re-definition of the term witchcraft. The Wiccan definition - the Craft - lies at the foundation of all those modern Pagan Witchcraft Traditions including almost every familial and so-called ‘traditional’ ethnically themed Witchcraft Traditions. So one can say that authors like Cunningham, Morrison, Dugan, and Gelenorn are not part of the Religion of Wicca but they are not exactly non-Wiccan either. Also non-Wiccan Witchcraft is sometimes used as a description for any Pagan Witchcraft not practised within a religious framework although Wicca is scarcely the only such religious tradition. So when an author like Galenorn says she is non-Wiccan, you may want to consider that she may simply saying she isn’t a Witch practising within a religious framework like that of Wicca.

Looking over my rather extensive library, I would be hard pressed to find any (Pagan) witchcraft author or book that can truly be said to be non-Wiccan. They all use Gardner’s re-definition as a foundation with varying degrees of distancing and all too often, an emphasis on the mythological history of witchcraft rather than the documented origin/roots of the ‘Craft. On the other hand, I do have a number of books on indigenous and historic witchcraft,  but these tend to be universally negative in practise and are largely irrelevant to the actual practise of modern Pagan Traditions. (They do factor into the mythological history though) I also have books on generic spellcraft and magical systems but defining a Witch simply as someone who practises magic or spells has always seemed to me to be very limiting compared to what a Witch might be.

Let me assume here that you all wish to remain/learn/practise within the positive framework of that modern re-definition and within the spectrum labelled as Pagan Witchcraft yet be distinctly distanced from the Religion of Wicca's specific definition of religious witchcraft.

So rather than putting the emphasis on sources being non-Wiccan, perhaps you need to look at what might or would define the nuts and bolts of a practise of the Craft by a Witch who is not  Wiccan?

Just as a means of illustrating what some of the nuts and bolts might be, although it is a bit dated, I listed them on this old thread, I think about the sixth or seventh posts...

Witchcraft 101

Having a framework - the nuts and bolts that you can actually practise -  and keeping in mind that a framework evolves and changes as you grow in experience and knowledge,  the framework still would give you a tool, a filter or lens to evaluate any and all sources. You can then extract, test and incorporate what works for you within your evolving practise.

This would take the emphasis off trying to not be Wiccan and passing up sources that might be valuable in 'crafting' your practise and instead, place the emphasis on establishing your own unique 'Craft as a Pagan Witch. 

C.H.
Flag Treegoddess January 27, 2008 12:01 PM EST

So one can say that authors like Cunningham, Morrison, Dugan, and Gelenorn are not part of the Religion of Wicca but they are not exactly non-Wiccan either.



I agree with what you are saying. 

In a way its like a Baptist or Lutheran or Methodist saying they have nothing to do with Catholicism, when all the Protestants broke away from exactly that. They may have changed/adapted things, but the ROOT of Christianity  is from Catholicism.

Flag tameless_heart January 27, 2008 12:47 PM EST
Hey guys, try not to stay off topic or post unneccessary commentary on this thread. It is important it remains clear and easy to follow. ^_^

Celtic Tree Mysteries- Blamiers
Tao of Pooh (yes I know this isn't pagan but its a great religious book)
Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 27, 2008 1:18 PM EST

tameless_heart wrote:

Hey guys, try not to stay off topic or post unneccessary commentary on this thread. It is important it remains clear and easy to follow. ^_^

Celtic Tree Mysteries- Blamiers
Tao of Pooh (yes I know this isn't pagan but its a great religious book)





And suddenly, without warning, I am confused.  :confused:

Flag tameless_heart January 27, 2008 2:15 PM EST
I just meant the random "Oh I totally agree" posts....
Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 27, 2008 2:37 PM EST
[QUOTE=tameless_heart;244700]I just meant the random "Oh I totally agree" posts....[/QUOTE]


I do appreciate the point you are trying to make here but as this was not created as a SST (Specific and Serious Topic) thread,  the topic may and is allowed to digress, wander and evolve just as it would within normal conversations. And....it can be brought back to the original topic if need be. :)

Also, I hope you won't mind if I point out that 'Oh I totally agree' posts are actually on topic because the member is simply indicating that he or she too believes or feels the same way about that topic. He or she may also elaborate on that agreement and by doing so contribute to the discussion.

Personally, I always appreciate those kind of posts because it indicates to me who are not only following the discussion as it evolves but who are continuing to participate.

Respectfully,
C.H.
Flag tameless_heart January 27, 2008 3:25 PM EST
I should have been more specific...but I was thinking a thread more along the lines of what tehy have on the asatru boards. This is les sof a discussion, as I saw it, as it was a list of things to read, so we dont' have to answer a million different "what do I read first?" posts.
Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 27, 2008 3:34 PM EST

tameless_heart wrote:

I should have been more specific...but I was thinking a thread more along the lines of what tehy have on the asatru boards. This is les sof a discussion, as I saw it, as it was a list of things to read, so we dont' have to answer a million different "what do I read first?" posts.





Well, since we are all stickied now, at least folks will be able to find this thread easily!  :D

Flag tameless_heart January 27, 2008 3:53 PM EST
Doesn't stop it from confusing unfortunately. Oh well, I'm not going to argue with anyone about it. Chat away people... although, that's waht the pub is for....
Flag Feinics January 27, 2008 6:34 PM EST
Thanks lexa and TG!:) Some of them iv read! but  theres one or two iv yet to read! cheers!

I totally take yer point creaky but theres alot out there about witchcraft from the wiccan stance and I wanted to read more from a different point of view, really just to feed the brain with something a bit a different. Thats the reason I put the emphasis on non wiccan because of the interchangeable use of witchcraft and wicca, taking for granted the common influences. Though I would at risk my life here and suggest there are other influences on modern witchcraft other then Wicca  ....
*feinics ducks the flying rocks* 
Theres are things to be gained from reading wicca material Il agree I just fancied a change and to feed the brain more then really define my craft upon:) 

Sorry TH:o but its hard to have a recommended reading list with out saying why its recommended or what parts are recommended, perfect example would be newbies who are suggested SRW's books and then complain later they've been suggested books that a lot of people have a problem  and weren't given disclaimers of this part is accurate that parts inaccurate so on so forth..

Maybe we can have a separate board to discuss the books if you'd like to keep this strictly list format??
Flag Feinics January 27, 2008 6:34 PM EST
Thanks lexa and TG!:) Some of them iv read! but  theres one or two iv yet to read! cheers!

I totally take yer point creaky but theres alot out there about witchcraft from the wiccan stance and I wanted to read more from a different point of view, really just to feed the brain with something a bit a different. Thats the reason I put the emphasis on non wiccan because of the interchangeable use of witchcraft and wicca, taking for granted the common influences. Though I would at risk my life here and suggest there are other influences on modern witchcraft other then Wicca  ....
*feinics ducks the flying rocks* 
Theres are things to be gained from reading wicca material Il agree I just fancied a change and to feed the brain more then really define my craft upon:) 

Sorry TH:o but its hard to have a recommended reading list with out saying why its recommended or what parts are recommended, perfect example would be newbies who are suggested SRW's books and then complain later they've been suggested books that a lot of people have a problem  and weren't given disclaimers of this part is accurate that parts inaccurate so on so forth..

Maybe we can have a separate board to discuss the books if you'd like to keep this strictly list format??
Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 27, 2008 6:36 PM EST

Feinics wrote:

Thanks lexa and TG!:) Some of them iv read! but  theres one or two iv yet to read! cheers!

I totally take yer point creaky but theres alot out there about witchcraft from the wiccan stance and I wanted to read more from a different point of view, really just to feed the brain with something a bit a different. Thats the reason I put the emphasis on non wiccan because of the interchangeable use of witchcraft and wicca, taking for granted the common influences. Though I would at risk my life here and suggest there are other influences on modern witchcraft other then Wicca  ....
*feinics ducks the flying rocks* 
Theres are things to be gained from reading wicca material Il agree I just fancied a change and to feed the brain more then really define my craft upon:) 

Sorry TH:o but its hard to have a recommended reading list with out saying why its recommended or what parts are recommended, perfect example would be newbies who are suggested SRW's books and then complain later they've been suggested books that a lot of people have a problem  and weren't given disclaimers of this part is accurate that parts inaccurate so on so forth..

Maybe we can have a separate board to discuss the books if you'd like to keep this strictly list format??




I have no problem debating the books suggested right here.

Flag Sacrificialgoddess January 27, 2008 6:36 PM EST

Feinics wrote:

Thanks lexa and TG!:) Some of them iv read! but  theres one or two iv yet to read! cheers!

I totally take yer point creaky but theres alot out there about witchcraft from the wiccan stance and I wanted to read more from a different point of view, really just to feed the brain with something a bit a different. Thats the reason I put the emphasis on non wiccan because of the interchangeable use of witchcraft and wicca, taking for granted the common influences. Though I would at risk my life here and suggest there are other influences on modern witchcraft other then Wicca  ....
*feinics ducks the flying rocks* 
Theres are things to be gained from reading wicca material Il agree I just fancied a change and to feed the brain more then really define my craft upon:) 

Sorry TH:o but its hard to have a recommended reading list with out saying why its recommended or what parts are recommended, perfect example would be newbies who are suggested SRW's books and then complain later they've been suggested books that a lot of people have a problem  and weren't given disclaimers of this part is accurate that parts inaccurate so on so forth..

Maybe we can have a separate board to discuss the books if you'd like to keep this strictly list format??




I have no problem debating the books suggested right here.

Flag CreakyHedgewitch January 30, 2008 7:23 AM EST
<<<>>

Certainly. Your life is in no danger at all. Nothing evolves in isolation.

<<<>>>

Assuming you mean a separate thread here. Make such an SST thread and that will mean any post off topic must be removed by the Host. Combining the list(s) with short reviews might also be useful.

C.H.
Flag Feinics January 30, 2008 9:00 AM EST
[QUOTE=CreakyHedgewitch;251465]

Certainly. Your life is in no danger at all. Nothing evolves in isolation. C.H.[/QUOTE]

phew! i'l live to post another day so :)


[QUOTE=CreakyHedgewitch;251465]
Assuming you mean a separate thread here. Make such an SST thread and that will mean any post off topic must be removed by the Host. Combining the list(s) with short reviews might also be useful.

C.H.[/QUOTE]

Oops  thread yes thats what I meant! I was quite happy discussing it here I dont think we really went off topic myself but since this thread is TH's baby i'll leave it to her make the final decision! But reviews would be a good addition!!
Flag tameless_heart January 30, 2008 10:58 AM EST
I think it's fine. If it gets too convoluted we can do that. Just for the sake of future users, try to keep as on topic as we can? It doesn't have to SST for people to at least stay on topic.

On that note a few random book recommends on the Witchcraft Histeria:

A Delusion of Satan (reads more like a novel)
The Witch Hunt in Early Modern Europe (reads fairly dryly)
Flag Embersfire April 15, 2008 7:38 AM EDT
A couple of slim books I lend to people who express an interest in paganism:-
Paganism A beginners guide,Teresa Moorey
Principles of Paganism,Vivianne Crowley
I also have The Idiots Guide to Paganism, which is another favourite lend.
Anything by Starhawk is usually not bad, but a special favourite is The Pagan book of living and dying. Also, her novels are good. It seems I have a lot of the books everyone else here has, though!
Flag Akairose April 29, 2008 5:22 AM EDT
Any one else having the same problem i am with books.  So heres my problem I am trying to expand my knowadge base and the only books i seem to find are wicca 101 or basic books disgues as more advance books basiclly stating the same stuff over and over again. I am quit tried of reading the same thing worded 5 different ways. ( And i wnder why i am in a spirtual rut) I currenly own All of ChunningHams books, 2 of Starhawks , the witchs Bible ( one of these days i might get to it but i realy dont agree with graderian tradiotions ) and some random fluff buy various authors to include SilverRavenloft ( occaisonal she has good pionts but seems to repeat same theme) Maybe i am asking to much but i have been a solitary for 7 years now and i think i am truly mising something and i realy hate to start back at 101 class (you know the 101 books and term seem to be a new thing as the last 3 or so years unless i am mistake is this a fluff making excuse or am i going nuts) .  Please excuses the grammer and spelling mishaps

-Akairose
Flag Dromahair April 29, 2008 11:22 AM EDT
My suggestion:

Print out the first 10 or so posts in this thread.

Highlight the titles that look interesting to you.
(paying special attention to the posts of SG and Creaky)

Visit Amazon.com or other suitable online retail outlet.
(or possible used bookstores/ebay for volumes that may be out of print)

Happy reading!  :)
Flag CreakyHedgewitch April 30, 2008 9:18 AM EDT
[QUOTE=Akairose;464119]Any one else having the same problem i am with books.  So heres my problem I am trying to expand my knowadge base and the only books i seem to find are wicca 101 or basic books disgues as more advance books basiclly stating the same stuff over and over again. I am quit tried of reading the same thing worded 5 different ways. ( And i wnder why i am in a spirtual rut) I currenly own All of ChunningHams books, 2 of Starhawks , the witchs Bible ( one of these days i might get to it but i realy dont agree with graderian tradiotions ) and some random fluff buy various authors to include SilverRavenloft ( occaisonal she has good pionts but seems to repeat same theme) Maybe i am asking to much but i have been a solitary for 7 years now and i think i am truly mising something and i realy hate to start back at 101 class (you know the 101 books and term seem to be a new thing as the last 3 or so years unless i am mistake is this a fluff making excuse or am i going nuts) .  Please excuses the grammer and spelling mishaps

-Akairose[/QUOTE]
Akairose,

Several observations on what you have asked that hopefully might prove helpful.

Wicca is an experiential religion. All that can be written about the Religion are the basics because second-hand and third-hand accounts are all that can be shared from first-hand experiences through writing. Outside of lineaged traditions and especially as a self-taught solitary, all that books can teach you is the same basics as you have discovered. To get to 202 and beyond, you as a solitary have to teach yourself – through your daily commitment to the Gods. Through practicing your faith. Through enactment of your ethics. Through both experiences and the thoughtful reflection on those experiences over time. Through ongoing study with no barriers to what you study other than accessibility and ethics.

Books can also not address the lineaged information that lies at the core of the Religion – as it was conceived being practiced – as this is only passed down through oathbound oral transmission contained within this mystery religion. As a solitary practitioner, you would not have access to this information (unless trained by a lineaged teacher), you would not be able to be initiated or experience the specific Mysteries of Wicca and you would also not be experiencing your faith within the dynamics of a group or coven. That is what books and self-practitioning cannot provide you as a Wiccan and therefore what you will be missing. That said, many self-taught and solitary practitioners do have profound relationships to the Gods of Wicca as he or she understands them to be outside of lineaged information and he or she can craft life-long and viable practices of Wicca from the basics, experience, commitment and practice.

If you restrict yourself to only what you agree with, your depth and breadth of knowledge about the religion you are practicing (or any subject) will remain limited to the basics. Studying does not mean you have to accept or enact whatever you study. No book is a waste of time even if the only thing you walk away with is, not for me. What you get from such ongoing studies may be only a snapshot in history of what Wicca was or was meant to be. This is what enables you to understand the legacy behind, origin of or relevance of whatever you practice today as Wicca and how to understand authors who have re-interpreted Wicca for various reasons. In the latter category for example I would put Cunningham who wrote about Neo-Wicca. Starhawk who isn’t even Wiccan but uses the term for a variety of reasons. Silver Ravenwolf who writes about her own unique version of Neo-Wicca. The Farrers who wrote the Witches Bible are much closer to what Wicca was meant to be but even they didn’t reveal certain oathbound information.

Dromahair's suggestion is well worth considering. You certainly should consider doing some degree of (or further) research into the history of Wicca, perhaps as a starting point, Ronald Hutton’s “Triumph of the Moon” and going through his 72-page bibliography for more suggestions, if this thread does not provide you with what you are looking for. Studying the history - actual and mythological -  will help you with understanding the bigger picture. I would also recommend studying Gardner’s original books (which I believe can be found online though you can also buy them on Amazon second-hand) to see how he conceived Wicca to be practised.

Be Wiccan. Experience your faith each day. Study widely and not just where you agree. Talk to others, discuss, ask questions, decide what you accept and understand why. Be skeptical. Be joyful. Expand your knowledge about the bigger picture and over time, this will help you to evolve a deeper and richer enactment of your religion.

C.H.
Flag Akairose May 1, 2008 2:14 AM EDT
Thank you for the advice i think the history route should be good for me at this time. At the moment i have to some seroius reorganization of my life. But i will take your advice to heart and make more time for my spriyual health. (i have had issues getting the time i need due to my army job)

Thank you once again.
Akairose
Flag Turenna May 6, 2008 11:15 AM EDT
Being new to this whole Pagan topic, I find the list of books to read very helpful. I have been reading several of the topic threads and find that I really needed somewhere to start the exploration of my beliefs. I believe that reading some of the listed books will help me in that endeavor. I love to read anyway.
Flag Diarmuid July 6, 2008 11:57 AM EDT
Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandanavian and Celtic Religions by H.R. Ellis Davidson
A History of Pagan Europe by Prudence Jones and Nigel Pennick

Both historical. The first one, Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe, I really do recommend, it is a interesting read.
As for the second one, it is a good start for historical study, though I ave found a couple faults here and there in the Celtic and Germanic sections of the book. But it is still a good read and has a basic hold on Pagan Europe.

And ditto JtA's suggestions for the Collections of Celtic Myths and Legends and Icelandic Edda.
Flag Earthpassion July 12, 2008 2:32 PM EDT
[QUOTE=tameless_heart;236678]What about...(although it's fairly suspect) Drawing Down the Moon, hmm...
Ah, although it's not pagan, I reccommend Grandmother's Secrets. It's about the femine spirit expressed through sacred dance, particularly belly dance. On that note, Sacred Women Sacred Dance...[/QUOTE]
Can I ask why you think Drawing Down the Moon is suspect?
Other than being outdated I mean?

For most of my life I thought I was some kind of weirdo, I heard the trees, grasses, ants, etc talking to me. I had all kinds of crazy thoughts and feelings. One person encouraged me to delve deeper, to learn more, to talk about, to...I don't know the correct word but I was given a safe place to explore.
When I was loaned Drawing Down the Moon it was like...
Oh My God! Listen to this! Isn't that what I've always said?
Oh my god! Listen to this! Isn't this exactly what I told you?
Drawing Down the Moon is filled with people who are not afraid to embrass their spirituality and it made me feel it helped me to do the same.

I'm probably saying this really badly
Flag Sacrificialgoddess July 12, 2008 2:50 PM EDT

Earthpassion wrote:

Can I ask why you think Drawing Down the Moon is suspect?
Other than being outdated I mean?

For most of my life I thought I was some kind of weirdo, I heard the trees, grasses, ants, etc talking to me. I had all kinds of crazy thoughts and feelings. One person encouraged me to delve deeper, to learn more, to talk about, to...I don't know the correct word but I was given a safe place to explore.
When I was loaned Drawing Down the Moon it was like...
Oh My God! Listen to this! Isn't that what I've always said?
Oh my god! Listen to this! Isn't this exactly what I told you?
Drawing Down the Moon is filled with people who are not afraid to embrass their spirituality and it made me feel it helped me to do the same.

I'm probably saying this really badly



Drawing Down the Moon is a good book, and Margot Adler a good journalist, but her chapter on the Asatruar and the Heathen stuff in general, I have been told, by Heathens, is pretty crappy.

Flag tameless_heart July 12, 2008 3:12 PM EDT
Not to mention most of her work has been discredited from an archaeological standpoint. She has a lot of fanciful history in her books, but for what they are worth, they serve as a good introduction...
Flag CreakyHedgewitch July 13, 2008 10:32 AM EDT
[QUOTE=tameless_heart;620460]Not to mention most of her work has been discredited from an archaeological standpoint. She has a lot of fanciful history in her books, but for what they are worth, they serve as a good introduction...[/QUOTE]


I don't believe one can write meaningfully about modern Paganism without some degree of  its mythological history. The latter is entwined with the actual history to such an extent that both must be studied to make sense of either. Each author as well writes from her or his experiences, beliefs and prejudices and therefore can produce only snapshots of opinion that to complete the analogy, the reader can then choose to use in his or her picture album.

As TH put it, DDTM is a good introduction. Take what is useful to you and keep studying further. Simply be prepared to change whatever you learned within this book and to have it challenged by future research.

C.H.
Flag Ursyl July 14, 2008 11:42 PM EDT
I'm surprised to not see one of my favorite books listed here yet.

Pagans & Christians: The Personal Spiritual Experience, by Gus diZerega PhD

He does a lovely, positive, compare and contrast, without being insulting to either type of faith.

I really enjoy the book Being A Pagan edited by Ellen Evert Hopman and Lawrence Bond
Flag CreakyHedgewitch July 15, 2008 8:55 AM EDT
[QUOTE=Ursyl;625319]I'm surprised to not see one of my favorite books listed here yet.

Pagans & Christians: The Personal Spiritual Experience, by Gus diZerega PhD

He does a lovely, positive, compare and contrast, without being insulting to either type of faith.

I really enjoy the book Being A Pagan edited by Ellen Evert Hopman and Lawrence Bond[/QUOTE]


Ursyl,

I must confess, I found diZerega's book to be less than positive in places and like all authors on this subject, his definition of paganism remains limited to his own experiences. One of the more credible attempts though and I agree, worth reading.

The Hopman and Bond book is also worth reading though one should keep in mind that as a university thesis format, the authors opted to interview recognised authors and what are sometimes referred to as big-name-pagans. As snapshots of how paganism might and can  be defined, a good reference and a starting point to explore any of those definitions mentioned. As a practical guide to being a Pagan, it remains limited in scope.

C.H.
Flag Sacrificialgoddess July 15, 2008 8:57 AM EDT

CreakyHedgewitch wrote:

Ursyl,

I must confess, I found diZerega's book to be less than positive in places and like all authors on this subject, his definition of paganism remains limited to his own experiences. One of the more credible attempts though and I agree, worth reading.

The Hopman and Bond book is also worth reading though one should keep in mind that as a university thesis format, the authors opted to interview recognised authors and what are sometimes referred to as big-name-pagans. As snapshots of how paganism might and can  be defined, a good reference and a starting point to explore any of those definitions mentioned. As a practical guide to being a Pagan, it remains limited in scope.

C.H.





I found diZerega just a bit on the vague side, both on what it means to be a Pagan and what it means to be a Christian.  Limited, as you said, CH.

Flag Ursyl July 16, 2008 1:37 AM EDT
hmmm, clearly I need more study, which is a given anyway.

I given Zerega credit though for being open that his experience is in Wicca, and stating that he would be coming from that pov.

There's another book our library had (sad emphasis on "had" despite what I'm about to say), in which the author compared Wicca and Christianity, but with the clear aim (once you got into the real reading) of discrediting Wicca. She set up strawmen of false statements about Wicca, which she then used to "prove" how Christianity is better.  Book made me angry, because the intro and such purport to be rather different.  Book is listed as lost now, which, while I can't say is a great loss, is a loss none the less.  Makes me worry for the few decent books on Paganism our local library has.
Flag Ursyl July 16, 2008 1:37 AM EDT
hmmm, clearly I need more study, which is a given anyway.

I given Zerega credit though for being open that his experience is in Wicca, and stating that he would be coming from that pov.

There's another book our library had (sad emphasis on "had" despite what I'm about to say), in which the author compared Wicca and Christianity, but with the clear aim (once you got into the real reading) of discrediting Wicca. She set up strawmen of false statements about Wicca, which she then used to "prove" how Christianity is better.  Book made me angry, because the intro and such purport to be rather different.  Book is listed as lost now, which, while I can't say is a great loss, is a loss none the less.  Makes me worry for the few decent books on Paganism our local library has.
Flag Embersfire July 22, 2008 7:15 AM EDT
I am currently reading  Living with Honour: A Pagan Ethics by Emma Restall-Orr, which is giving me a lot to think about. Really not paganism:101. I'd recommend it to anyone else who wants something different to read. Its written from mostly an English Druid POV, which makes a change. Haven't finished it yet, so can't give an overall picture, but I am enjoying it so far.
Flag whitephoenix July 31, 2008 9:08 AM EDT
Can I suggest 'The Modern Pagan' by Brian Day. It's a good treatise on contmeporary (non-theistic) British paganism. I know that may not be to the liking of everyone here, the fact that it's non-theistic in practice, but it's a very very good and nutritionally practical book. (Much notice is given to the stories of the gods, but as sotries, as a non-theist I can only endorse this.)
Flag Seshen August 6, 2008 1:03 PM EDT
Here's the list I have on my site:

http://www.seshen.us/Pagan/reading.html
Flag lturton85 September 9, 2008 6:42 PM EDT
as a newbie thats not real sure where she wants to go, i'm kind of interested in EVERYTHING, sort of my own verison of electic what would be some good reads that would give me really good information on all of them.  I mean more than just general information
Flag hikoro October 17, 2008 1:27 AM EDT
The Triumph of the Moon by Hutton

A World full of Gods by Greer. Definitely not a 101 book.

mmm.... I don't read books on Neopaganism as much, I am more of a history and anthropology person...so there it is.
Flag hikoro October 17, 2008 1:30 AM EDT
General Neopaganism

The Triumph of the Moon by Hutton
A World full of Gods by Greer. Definitely not a 101 book.
The Science of the Craft by William Keith.

Traditional Witchcraft

The Forge of Tubal Cain
The Call of the Horned Piper

Divine mothers/goddesses, history and archeology

Dark Mother: African Origins and Godmothers. Loved it.

mmm.... I don't read books on Neopaganism as much, I am more of a history and anthropology person...so there it is.
Flag gorm_sionnach October 22, 2008 1:35 AM EDT
"Triumph of the Moon" is definitely an excellent source for the historical development of Wicca.

"Drawing Down the Moon" by Margot Adler is another good book with a wide overview of modern Pagan practices and traditions.

"Wicca for the Solitary Practitioner" by Scott Cunningham remains of of the best of the "Wicca 101" books, and gives a simple but in depth explanation of the various aspects of Wicca, albeit it in a solitary context.

"Spiral Dance" by Starhawk is one of those seminal texts, while some of it borders on Feminist Polemic, keep in mind it was written more than 20 years ago at the peak of second wave Feminism, Starhawk admits her biases in both the 10th and 20th anniversary editions of the book. A good introduction to the Reclaiming tradition.

"Celebrating the Seasons of Life" by Ashleen O'Gaea. A pair of books, one going from Beltane to Mabon, the other from Samhain to Ostara are easy to read books with overviews of the eight major Pagan holidays. They provide some background info, rituals, activities, symbols, etc. While some aspects will be less appropriate for more focused traditions (i.e. Reconstructionist), the books provde a good general guide for Wiccan's, as well as 'Pan-Pagans'.

"A Circle of Stones" by Erynn Rowan Laurie is no longer in print, but if you can find a used copy, or download it in PDF from her website, it is one of the only books available on Celtic Reconstructionist practices. It's a bit dated, as ERL is wont to admit, but it remains an excellent source for creating ritual, altars and every prayer beads. If you plan on following CR, it is almost a must.

"A Brief History of the Druids" Peter Beresford Ellis. An excellent primer on Druids (in a historic Celtic context, not associated with the modern Druidic associations, though much of their source material came from many of the sources quoted in the book. And I do not mean to disparage modern Druids or Neo-Druids ) It's a fairly recent book, and gives an excellent overview of the development, practices, and functions of the Druids in Celtic Societies. More History than practice, but good for those interested in a more historically authentic version of the Druids than romanticized versions out there.

For some online sources:
Wikipedia is also a rather useful source on general information about the majority of Pagan traditions, as well as info on deity, mythology and so on. Usually if an electronic version of a source is available, there will be a link to it somewhere on the page.

Witchvox's information link on Traditions is very extensive and most are written by members of the various paths. www.witchvox.com
The CR FAQ, on Paganachd is the single best source for info on CR, period. The list of further reading material is detailed and very comprehensive.

Sorry if some of my entries are a little CR oriented, but it's what I know.
Flag CLHazz October 22, 2008 3:30 PM EDT
That's all very useful books to read, unforunately all I have is Barnes and Noble, haven't checked the library yet. As to I'm on a kind of tight budget I haven't ordered from the net, still live at home with the folks, so my reading is all from the internet. However whenever I get my own place( Hopefully w/in 6 months to a year) and get a part time job, I will start collecting and reading books to learn more. I love to read and soak things up like a sponge, it what stays in my head clearly that may be a problem as I have a learning disability, namely with problem solving. It's something to look forward to somewhere down the road though
Flag Skyshroud December 14, 2008 12:43 PM EST
[QUOTE=]So one can say that authors like Cunningham, Morrison, Dugan, and Gelenorn are not part of the Religion of Wicca but they are not exactly non-Wiccan either. 

I agree with what you are saying.

In a way its like a Baptist or Lutheran or Methodist saying they have nothing to do with Catholicism, when all the Protestants broke away from exactly that. They may have changed/adapted things, but the ROOT of Christianity is from Catholicism.
[/QUOTE]

  Actually the root of Christianity is the Eastern Orthodox Church, from which the original Roman Archbishop broke away from, and he was just a Bishop of Rome then, he needed to claim to be the direct representative of God to keep the insurgent Goths at bay, in order to keep the Church alive there, that's how the Catholics began, and then that is what we inherited in Europe, save for some of the Baltic and a few other regions anyway.  When Luther broke off it was (according to him) to bring things back to the "ancient church" of which the E. Orthodox was descended, but his theology inevitably doesn't match up as well as one would hope, and then you get the brakes from him and others who sprang up like Zwingli who happened around the same time but separately from Luther, to get differing branches of protestants... But back to the pagan books list.

  I'm better at the specific categories books than with general Paganism books, man I have to post more on here after I get home and look through what I still have, I used to work at a New Age bookstore, you'd think I'd be better at this, lol.  Here they are though:

1. [Scott] Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Crystal Gem and Metal Magic: Excellent preparatory work for beginners and for intermediate stone magic (good stone book in general, but I mainly say to intermediate because there are several books now that go further and more pain-stakingly extensive into particular stone types and their uses, but this is a good foundational work for anyone to own).  This was the first truly magic book I ever picked up at age 15, I had always been attracted to stones since age 5 and this finally allowed me to understand that better.  Also goes into adapting stones to be used like the tarot and other bonuses that are useful.  I've often found Cunningham to be a bit too white-lighter for me in some respects, but he knows his herbs and stones quite well.

  2. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs: Another Cunningham book, and he's more and herbalist than a stone person so, as you might expect, very good, it gives a thorough list of herbs with their elemental, planetary, deity and magickal correspondences and their use historically and mythologically.  He also provides codes next to each to denote various herbs as safe, unsafe, and every condition that they have been known currently (at the time this book was written) to cause or aggravate in between (when applicable), with sketch illustrations of most herbs.

3. Love is in the Earth: A Kaleidoscope of Crystals - The Reference Book Describing the Metaphysical Properties of the Mineral Kingdom: This book by the author Melody (her entire name credit, no last/other name given), is another stone magic book, and an advanced one at that.  This is basically the book you hit a mugger with if none of your stones are handy... I've done it before, but it is hard to find a stone or crystal type not listed in here (so far I'm up only to about 5 or 6, and those only because I studied mineralogy so long before finding stone magic), so pat yourself on the back if you do.  Once you've gotten past Cunningham and the intermediate level, pick up a copy of this and prepare to have the crystal knowledge section of your mind blown open to new stuff.

4. Animal-speak: The Spiritual & Magical Powers of Creatures Great & Small‎: I've seen Ted Andrews get flack from people for being too topical or just too dispersed since he has so many books and on so many topics, but honestly, don't buy completely into any of that hype, he's good, and his animal totem book is one of his best according to most, and I think rightfully so.  Andrews goes all out and includes very many kinds of animals in here, there are only a few I can think of that he missed, (one which I don't fault him for because it is mainly centered on animals not unknown to westerners, and this one of my bird totems only comes as close to the U.S and Europe as Puerto Rico), the major exception being shark... one of mine grrr.  But he hits on most anything most of us would need to read about and goes into all kind of ways to commune with, communicate with, interpret signs of and honor your totems and other animals in general.
The only real criticism I could make of this other than it could have had a few other animals (but which totem book couldn't?) is that he groups them in categories by kind of animal not ture alphabetical order and that can take so getting used to, but it is certainly worth it. 
  For a good supplement to this work infused with totems from Australia, you can go to "Animal Spirit Guides: An Easy-to-Use Handbook for Identifying and Understanding Your Power Animals and Animal Spirit Helpers" By Steven D. Farmer, or his book prior to this "Power Animals" (as the aforementioned was written after his main work--power animals--when people asked about animals it didn't contain, so I’d say go with spirit guides if you can find it).  Armed with Andrews and Farmer you shouldn't need much more if ever.

  Also a few brief side notes: Lesser Key of Solomon (in all its various reprintings) is a good and foundational book for anyone into ceremonial magick, but... DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES GET INTO THIS BOOK UNLESS YOU HAVE SEVERAL YEARS OF CEREMONIAL STUDY AND EXPERIENCE UNDER YOUR BELT, AND LIKELY A QUALIFIED CEREMONIALIST TEACHER, THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE SUMMONINGS OF DEMONIC BEINGS IN THIS BOOK IS NOT TO BE TRIFFLED WITH, IF YOU'RE NOT STRONG ENOUGH TO KEEP THE CIRCLE TOGETHER, WHICH USUALLY TAKES SEVERAL PEOPLE WHO ALL NOW WHAT THEY'RE DOING THEY WILL GET FREE AND MAKE YOU PAY DEARLY FOR EXTENDED PERIODS... I wash my hands of anything that happens, you were warned. 
  That info is included as it was used by Christian magicians back in the 16th and 17th centuries to summon, and temporarily Subjugate demons for the purposes of either using their unique talents to learn new knowledge or get things done, or to interrogate them about the hierarchy of hell.  So please don't pick this up and start messing with things you might not be ready for, even if you don't believe demons exist, these rituals and sigils/signatures will call in negative forces no matter what you view them as, which is the main reason I don't and never will use them (unless it is a matter of life or death and maybe not even then).  That said though, this is one of THE foundational works on (non-kabalistic) ceremonial magick tradition.  You can also try Israel Regardie's The Golden Dawn which contains much of this info, and kabalistic stuff too, but again, same cautionary note applies.  If you are crazy enough to try the demonic stuff down the line, might I recommend you get MUCH practice with the angelic summonings first as if the circle breaks on those you probably won't have what you call down ready and willing to kick your @$$ into the next century.

  As to the non-Wiccan Witchcraft books, I'd probably recommend Christopher Penczak 's High, Outer, Shamanic, Inner, and Living temple of Witchcraft books, each one focuses on one of the 5 elements, and is quite extensive, though I haven't read through them enough myself but I've seen enough to know they're good.  He also has a book on magickal and psychic self-defense called "The Witch's Shield" that is worth a look.

  Guess that's about covers it for now like I said I might update this later.
Flag CreakyHedgewitch December 14, 2008 7:08 PM EST
I appreciate you taking the time to make recommendations and you bring an interesting perspective and background to the boards.

I would also like to remind folks that Cunningham wrote mainly from the perspective of Neo-Wicca beliefs. The Religion of Wicca does use a specific religious type of magic but that is not found in books. His books (all of which I do own) are excellent however for generic Pagan Witchcraft, non-Wiccan traditions of the modern Craft, Neo-Pagans who use such disciplines. Also for those Wiccans who may choose to use such in his or her personal practice. In themselves however, spellcraft, most magical systems, herblore, crystals and conversing with animals and totems in themselves are not Wiccan practices. Using such also doesn’t make anyone Wiccan.

Interestingly Christopher Penczak is often recommended for the Wiccan practices of the Craft although for differing reasons. Your opinion of his books when you are able to read them would be interesting to read.

I would also note IMO that correspondences systems are best created in the first-person. Take the systems presented in such books as starting points, test each correspondence and if such works for you, use it. If it doesn’t, find something else that does. Just don't blindly accept any correspondence just because it is written up in a book. And be practical. Exotic ingredients, plants and minerals that one isn't likely to run across or be able to afford if one did can always be substituted with something more local or affordable. Take any history found with a grain of scepticism as well. For example, much of crystal lore along with all of coloured candle spellcraft are modern practices, not ancient.

Thank you also for the warning about the Lesser Key of Solomon and the Golden Dawn. We are going to differ somewhat on this subject however. One of the interesting things I have noted over the years is that such books in the hands of dabblers and incompetents tend to result in zip results. I do agree that one shouldn’t work with anything one isn’t ready for but often, doing so comes simply to nought. Or the absence of real results leads to overly imaginative fallout that tends to be tied back into the legends and myths around such books. You do appear to believe in the underlying foundation of such works so for you, naturally they represent that which others should be warned about. I would agree that your warnings are timely and should be heeded for anyone who actually do believe in what such books represent on some level. Dabblers and wanna-be-witches however are not always at risk however.

Perhaps where we actually differ is that I consider belief to be THE foundational ingredient in using anything effectively. If one sincerely doesn’t believe in something, in my experience, it isn’t about to jump up and bite you afterwards just by existing or because one read it. In cases where someone has come to the conclusion that such books contain or invite in negative forces regardless of whether one believes or not, usually the person has already decided to believe in its underlying validity. Not believing on the other hand in demons and angels etc., pretty much pulls that plug although it might be argued that if one believes the cause of something to be other than negative forces, demons or angels, then the credit simply will then be given to whatever one believes in. Same results, different explanation.

C.H.
Flag Skyshroud December 16, 2008 12:50 AM EST
Creaky,
Sorry if you or anyone else thought I was getting a bit off topic, and I did realize that Cunningham has his flaws, which is why I made note that even though he wasn't my cup of tea, his basics on those subjects, at least to me, when I was coming at this from the perspective of interest in the topic matter itself not so much as the over-arching religious framework, were quite useful. 

As I said I was less up on the better witchcraft (whether it be Wicca, Neo-pagan more generally, reconstructionist or other) books but thought it might be nice to offer what I did know if those reading the posts already knew of their side interests, i.e. those apart from the core religious aspects but that are often part of what pagans work with.

As to the belief=potential in magic or lack thereof, I tend to agree with you actually, mainly because it has been show in paranormal research focused on psychic phenomena and is simply sound magical theory that belief and the consequent motivation thereof is key to a person's being able to tap into their abilities in specific situations, in cases of magic, this relates to raising energy to be put toward the goal and manifestation of that goal.

That said, yes, most person's who put little to no stock in the systems of high magick (note, I only even mentioed this book at all as someone earlier on in the post was asking about ceremonial magick, and I figured it would be a useful reference for them), would have a much harder time making said rituals effective, but I felt there was enough of a chance that it should be mentioned anyway, especially as my target audience for said book recommendation may well accept what was written within it as true and valid (and therefore have it be effective for them even if less so, if lack of experience is involved).

Lastly, I also agree with your cautionary note about accepting a particular author's set of correspondences for yourself without double checking or at least in some way, questioning.  In fact, in so far as Cunningham, I disagree with him on many, as I tend to disagree with many authors who offer certain elemental/planetary correspondences, but didn't want to mention this as I wanted to be careful not to pre-influence anyone else towards the same.  And though the more exotic herbs and stones can be difficult to come by and substituting say a fitting color of quartz for your magical purposes in the place of a better, but an expensive other stone is effcient and wise, this still shouldn't negate the value of texts describing them as it is still useful to know what they are good for when you hear them mentioned or run across them in person at a later date.

Just wanted to clarify, thanks for the correction and again sorry if I was straying form the core of the thread.
Flag CreakyHedgewitch December 19, 2008 4:08 PM EST

sorry if I was straying form the core of the thread.



You didn't. Cunningham tends to get recommended as a source on Wicca. Afterall, that is what he wrote was his topic. Whenever I come across such I tend to post to remind folks that not everyone considers Cunningham to represent the Religion of Wicca itself.

Threads continually go off topic because they are discussions between people. Listen to any conversation between more than two people and I suspect it won’t be long before it goes ‘off topic’ to some degree.  Here in the forum, if anyone wants a thread to remain on a specific topic, the subject title should start with SST: ‘name of thread’. On a Specific and Serious Topic thread, any posts that are off topic will get removed by a Host. Pretty much the only way to guarantee a thread will stay on topic, really.

I felt there was enough of a chance that it should be mentioned anyway, especially as my target audience for said book recommendation may well accept what was written within it as true and valid (and therefore have it be effective for them even if less so, if lack of experience is involved)



Agreed. I just hope that your emphatic warning will not pre-set someone’s beliefs. ‘Sheeple’ do have an alarming tendency to think anything in writing must therefore be true. :\

I also agree that study of exotic and expensive correspondences remains useful as one never knows when such knowledge will come in handy or in what context. Over the years though, I consistently seem to run into those newbies who are worried, sometimes to the point of being frantic, that if they don’t do or obtain or use exactly what are detailed in such books that they will be ‘doing it wrong’.

Practicality and independence of will do seem to go hand in hand, I’m afraid.

C.H.

Flag NightLad October 5, 2009 3:57 PM EDT

I'd recommend that you read... the wind.



Seriously, before you start letting other authors or individual’s perceptions influence you, go outside and spend some time to listen to your own intuitive connection to the Divine in whatever form it presents itself to you.



Then, go ahead and start sampling the ideas and perceptions of other people.

Flag Jessica June 28, 2010 10:34 PM EDT

Hi, everyone.  I quickly went through, and I didn't see my favorite book listed here so I thought I'd suggest it.


Its by Lilith McLelland, its called "Out of the Shadows".  Its very good, I suggest it to a lot of people who are interested in Paganism or Wicca, or those who are just curious about the topic.  It doesn't have a lot of the glitziness about it that many other books have - seems less like its trying to sell a path, and more trying to inform people about things the author sees constantly and is tired of (at least, with inconsistancies or misinformation.)

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