Post Reply
Page 1 of 3  •  1 2 3 Next
Switch to Forum Live View Hindu point of view
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 11:15AM #1
Dudette
Posts: 137
Hello everyone!

I thought of another question because you seem more open than some other religions.

I would like to know what Jews think of the Hindu point of view:

Religions are like different paths making their way to the top of a mountain.  We will only know what's up there when we get to the top.

Have a peaceful day...Dudette
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 11:43AM #2
vra
Posts: 6,403

Yo Dudette,


As you well know, we tend not to judge the validity of other religions and we tend not to condemn beliefs that differ from our own, but there are obviously limitations.  For example, some ancient Hindus offered up human sacrifices, which we're simply not going to accept, plus many, if not most of us, would probably try to get that practice stopped. 


Secondly, we tend to leave any final judgement to G-d since these types of decisions are beyond our pay grade.  Thirdly, we don't tend to believe that we as Jews somehow have an express to heaven (or whatever) whereas gentiles don't.  Fourth, the Tanakh says that nations will be judged on how they treat the poor, although there's other factors cited as well-- the point being is that moral actions tend to be more emphasized than politically-correct beliefs.


And finally, if there's two Jews here responding to your good question here, you'll probably get three answers or more.    


BTW, by coincidence, I was thinking of starting a threat on non-dualistic Judaism, which is a concept quite similar to what can be found in Hinduism.  Early this week is going to be busy for me, so I'll probably wait until mid-week to introduce it, and I hope you get involved.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 12:26PM #3
Pam34
Posts: 2,653

similarities that make a difference: at base - despite appearances to the contrary! - Hinduism does believe in a 'single deity' divinity: they just personify innumerable aspects of that single divinity as 'gods' or godlike beings, and individuals worship one or several 'manifestations'. That looks at least superficially like polytheism (and is readily understood as polytheism) and idolatry, and from our POV is definitely 'wrong' and would certainly be wrong for a Jew to adopt that attitude.


It also fosters syncretism, or assumptions that 'all gods are the same', which is diametrically different from Judaism's basic attitude, which tends to divide, name and separate things (to the nth degree) rather than lump them.



differences: at base - Hinduism sees history as a 'steady state' situation - the universe/world/life has no beginning and no end, and everything cycles eternally. That is a big difference from Judaism, which sees history as having both a definite beginning and a projected equally definite end.


As to how we as Jews should 'judge' Hindus or Hinduism: as Hindus, as long as people behave 'properly' toward others, they are just fine. Kindness, mercy and justice are more important than specifics of 'belief' about the ultimately unprovable supernatural. Hinduism as a religious philosophy would be considered a definite aveirah (sin) for a Jew to adopt. (Buddhism is easier, since Buddhism (except for some variants) does not actually have or require a 'deity' at all, and is 'easier' on the philosophical end, since it is rather open-ended - do I mean open-ended? perhaps something like 'indefinite' works, or 'personal'....).

Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 5:43PM #4
vra
Posts: 6,403

Pam, there are items I tend to agree with and there's items that I tend to question in regards to your response, but you didn't actually answer the basic question with the OP.  Does one have to have the politically-correct beliefs that you cited in order to be acceptable to G-d, iyo?

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 7:31PM #5
Pam34
Posts: 2,653

No. God requires that people 'behave well' to others, not that they possess some kind of orthodox 'beliefs'. That is why I said that Hindus AS Hindus, are 'okay' with God so long as their behavior is correct towards others.



That said, it is true that 'belief drives behavior', so there is a correlation (but behavior also drives belief, so it is not that simple).


Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 15, 2012 - 7:34PM #6
Bunsinspace
Posts: 5,917

BS"D


Dudette,


I don't have any problem with Hinduism.  To me it is another culturally rich perspective on human existence.  I enjoyed reading the Vedas, the Ramayana and many contemporary texts from those traditions.  Being Jewish in no wise prejudices me against other cultures and peoples.  You will not find me pouring milk over a lingam but I do not begrudge those who do.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 16, 2012 - 7:50AM #7
nieciedo
Posts: 5,617

Classical Jewish texts, however, such as the Talmud and Maimonides' Mishne Torah, consider all non-Jewish religions to be idolatrous and inherently sinful. However, they grant leniency to Gentiles who don't know any better and who are just following the customs of their ancestors. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 16, 2012 - 10:17AM #8
Dudette
Posts: 137

Hello everyone!


Thank you for your responses!


What I'm trying to get at is what do you think of the idea that the God different religions reffer to is the same but the different paths going up the mountain are the different ways that people interpret the divine. 


At least, that's how I understand it.


I would add that what different religions have in common (being good, charity, etc.) is what the paths are made of.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 16, 2012 - 10:21AM #9
Dudette
Posts: 137

Hi vra!


I'll be sure to be on the lookout for your thread on non-dualistic Judaism...it sounds like an interesting topic!

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 16, 2012 - 10:27AM #10
Dudette
Posts: 137

Hi Pam!


You write:


It also fosters syncretism, or assumptions that 'all gods are the same', which is diametrically different from Judaism's basic attitude


Do you mean to tell me that you don't believe that Jews, Christians, Muslims, etc. are referring to the same "entity"?

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 1 of 3  •  1 2 3 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook