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3 years ago  ::  Apr 27, 2012 - 6:07PM #21
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 864

Apr 27, 2012 -- 11:33AM, dio wrote:


Humanity will always have the objective suffereing of getting old ill and dying. Even the enlightened one suffered these things. This is not the suffering he was talking about. I am thinking He taught we can end the suffering we create in our mind.




Dio


Theravada Buddhism


There is a Time for Living and there is a Time for Dying.


Thus have I heard from my Teacher:


"Death is the only certainty in Life".


From Day One of my Buddhist Mental Training, I have been advised to keep this short Buddhist Dhamma in mind:


"HOW TO DIE" is more important than "HOW TO LIVE.


From Day One of my Buddhist Mental Training, there has only ever been One Sutta which has inspired me to practice:


www.bodhicitta.net/Metta%20Sutra.htm


The Metta Sutta.


My Buddhist Teacher taught me that Death is the only certainty in life. She told me that once I had accepted that we all must die, I may get on with my neighbours instead of hating them and getting involved with feuds.


She taught me that this is the Biography of the World:


They were all born,


They all lived.


They all died.


She taught me that once I had accepted that this life is impermanent, I could begin to work with kamma instead of being a slave to Kamma, and develop my Life as a Work of Art:


www.dhamma.org/en/art.shtml


But then, she taught me that the most valuable lesson that I will learn, is to know the difference between a Dead Body and a Body in Nirodha Samapatti:


Whilst the Theravada Buddhist Teaching may be said to be grounded in the Four Noble Truths, the salient Dhamma is Death. What happens when one dies:

The Third Noble Truth is the realisation of Nirodha, the Extinction of the Ego. If this were not true, then actual liberation would be impossible.

The similarities between Nirodha Samapatti and Death are as follows:

Similarities

1) A dead person is motionless

   A person in nirodha samapatti is also motionless.

2) A dead person does not breathe.

    A person in nirodha samapatti does not breathe.

Differences

3) A dead person becomes cold sometime after death.

    A person in nirodha samapatti is warm throughout the full duration of nirodha samapatti.

4) The Five Physical Senses are destroyed after the death of a person.

    The Five Physical Senses of a person in nirodha samapatti remain intact throughout the duration of nirodha samapatti.

Nirodha Samapatti is the Attainment of Extinction, the Penetration of Right View of the Third Noble Truth. During the lifetime of an Arahant, she may be able to enter into Nirodha Samapatti but does not remain in that state permanently. On her final death, she has extinguished the rebirth karma and she enters into the State of Nirodha Samapatti and the Full Realisation of Perfect Nibbana, which is beyond Samsara.



 


 


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3 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 8:35AM #22
dio
Posts: 5,078

For me truth confirms what I already intuitivly know as true.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 28, 2012 - 2:25PM #23
chevy956
Posts: 1,961

Apr 28, 2012 -- 8:35AM, dio wrote:

For me truth confirms what I already intuitivly know as true.


that is unverified personal gnosis, not to be confused with any type of universally applicable truth.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 4:20AM #24
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 864

Apr 28, 2012 -- 8:35AM, dio wrote:


For me truth confirms what I already intuitivly know as true.




Dio,


From the standpoint of Theravada Buddhism, there is a problem with the words "me" and "I".


There can be no Enlightenment whilst one attaches them to 'Truth'. One has to negate the Ego to become Enlightened:




This little song from the Beatles helps me to focus on the central task of getting rid of that blighter, which is the cause of all sorrow, lamentation and despair, The Karma Chameleon, who keeps on wriggling and changing, little old me.


Cool


Lyrics {Just the Lyrics not the comments].




www.sing365.com/music/lyric.nsf/I-Me-Min...

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 8:52AM #25
dio
Posts: 5,078

Apr 28, 2012 -- 2:25PM, chevy956 wrote:

Apr 28, 2012 -- 8:35AM, dio wrote:


For me truth confirms what I already intuitivly know as true.




that is unverified personal gnosis, not to be confused with any type of universally applicable truth.




In the spirit of full disclosure, that's my M O. Not claiming my truth to be universal but just a bit of the universal.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 29, 2012 - 9:03AM #26
dio
Posts: 5,078

So how does a Buddhist identify what is his/her own opinion? AS I would say, my opinion is... 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 30, 2012 - 7:30AM #27
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 864

Apr 29, 2012 -- 9:03AM, dio wrote:


So how does a Buddhist identify what is his/her own opinion? AS I would say, my opinion is... 




Dio,


With mindfulness. Noting that the 'I' which has an opinion, or an intutive insight is impermanent and empty of any inherent reality.


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3 years ago  ::  Apr 30, 2012 - 9:18AM #28
dio
Posts: 5,078

So, "I" am the five aggregates? contact perception thought formation and consciousness.

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 30, 2012 - 2:33PM #29
Bhakta_glenn
Posts: 864

Apr 30, 2012 -- 9:18AM, dio wrote:


So, "I" am the five aggregates? contact perception thought formation and consciousness.




Theravada Buddhism


The Five Khandhas present themselves as the Ego to the worldly human being:




what-buddha-said.net/library/Buddhist.Di...

Buddhist Dictionary
Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines,
by MahaThera Nyanatiloka

Khandha: the 5 'groups of existence' or 'groups of clinging' upādānakhandha alternative renderings: aggregates or a cluster, categories of clinging’s objects. These are the 5 aspects in which the Buddha has summed up all the physical and mental phenomena of existence, and which appear to the ignorant man as his ego, or personality, to wit:

        1 the materiality group khandha rūpa-khandha,
        2 the feeling group vedanā-khandha,
        3 the perception group saññā-khandha,
        4 the mental-construction group sankhāra-khandha,
        5 the consciousness-group viññāna-khandha



Keyword: ignorance


This word is not meant pejoratively, as an insult to non-Buddhists. In Theravada Buddhism, Ignorance is a Doctrinal Term meaning 'not understanding the Four Noble Truths'.


The worldly human being is a concept and not a reality. The Ego is also called Atta:




Buddhist Dictionary
Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines,
by MahaThera Nyanatiloka

what-buddha-said.net/library/Buddhist.Di...

Attā: Self, ego, personality, soul, is in Buddhism a mere conventional expression vohāradesanā, and not a designation for anything really existing; see: paramattha-desanā, anattā, puggala, satta, jīva.



The Buddha never taught the Doctrine of Atta; and Theravada Buddhism ascribes this Doctrine to Theism: God is Atta. Therefore, God is Ignorant because God does not understand the Four Noble Truths, without prejudice.


The Buddha taught the Doctrine of Anattā:





Anattā: No-self, egolessness, soullessness, impersonality, absence of identity, is the last of the 3 universal characteristics of existence ti-lakkhana. This anattā doctrine, which only is taught by a Buddha, teaches that neither within the bodily, material and mental phenomena of existence, nor outside of them, can be found anything at all, that in the ultimate sense could be regarded as a self-existing, real & same, ego-entity, identity, and soul, self or independently existing substance. This is the central core doctrine of Buddhism, crucial for understanding the message & method of Buddhism.


[...]

                Mere suffering exists, no sufferer is found;
                Actions are, but no actor is ever found;
                Nibbāna is, but no being exists that enters it;
                The path is, but no traveller is seen.



However, it helps if one has a sense of humour with regard to Buddhism.


Realising the non-existence of oneself is not for the faint-hearted. It can be pretty frightening stuff. Thus, Metta for oneself and others is developed. When one is with non-Buddhists offline, it is perhaps a little anti-social to begin with such an advanced Dhamma as Anattā.


Buddhism is not meant to make one feel miserable because of not existing. It is supposed to lighten one's life by removing the Burden of Existence, to enable one to overcome all fear and just be happy and peaceful.


The World is my Teacher, and with a little insight and practice, one may find mnemonics for the Dhamma in most things:




Smile

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3 years ago  ::  May 01, 2012 - 10:42AM #30
dio
Posts: 5,078

the song was ok but the images were disturbing. clowns scare me.

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