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Switch to Forum Live View Rahab part of the genealogy?
3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 3:23PM #1
Dudette
Posts: 137
Hello again!

I would like to know how Rahad made it in the genealogy.  She didn't have Hebrew parents (at least, not that I'm aware of).  Why not put the father who is the direct link?

Thanks for the help!
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 06, 2012 - 7:19PM #2
Pam34
Posts: 2,680

Do you mean the Jesus genealogies in the NT? Why should we care?


Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2012 - 11:30AM #3
Dudette
Posts: 137

Goodness gracious...isn't Rahab one of David's ancestors?

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2012 - 12:15PM #4
LeahOne
Posts: 16,476

Dudette, there is a Christian tradition from the GoMatt which says so.  But I don't know of that from Jewish tradition. 


Is it possible you are confusing Rahab with Ruth (who IS an ancestress of King David)?

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 07, 2012 - 12:31PM #5
LeahOne
Posts: 16,476

This is from the Wiki article on Rahab:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rahab


Michael hisCoogan claims the book of Joshua, more than any other book of the Bible, contains short narratives that explain by means of the narrative itself the origins of religious rituals, topographical features, genealogical relationships, and other aspects of ancient Israelite life, and that the legend of Rahab is such an example. The story of Rahab would therefore provide an answer as to how a Canaanite group became part of Israel in spite of the Deuternomistic injunction to kill all Canaanites and not to intermarry with them (Deut 20:16-18)(Deut 7:1-4)[9]


I find this very interesting - the more ways we've found to study our history, through archaeological evidence and DNA and such, the more apparent it becomes that 'the Jewish People' were a confederation of 1) 'immigrants' from Mesopotamia, 2) Caananites who revolted against their overlords 3) Escaped Egyptian peasants/slaves and 4) 'locals' from the area of 'Midian'.....and who knows how many other little groups?


As a metaphor, the 'mixed multitude' standing before Sinai to receive the Covenant and become the Jewish People certainly seems to be accurate!

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 12:38AM #6
Bunsinspace
Posts: 5,929

BS"D


Eine kleine nachtvorlesen:


www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1...

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 9:13AM #7
Dudette
Posts: 137

Hi Leah!


Ruth would be King David's grandmother and Rahab his great grandmother.


Do you mean to tell me that there is no such list in the Hebrew Scriptures?


 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 9:21AM #8
Dudette
Posts: 137

Hello again Leah!


You write:


Michael Coogan claims the book of Joshua, more than any other book of the Bible, contains short narratives that explain by means of the narrative itself the origins of religious rituals, topographical features, genealogical relationships, and other aspects of ancient Israelite life, and that the legend of Rahab is such an example. 


Two things:


1) what would these genealogical relationships be?


2) Rahab would be a legend?


 

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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 11:04AM #9
Pam34
Posts: 2,680

Ruth is listed as an ancestor of David. I don't recall Rahab in there anyplace.


from www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/jud...



There are two somewhat conflicting Jewish traditions concerning Rahab's profession and later life among the Israelites. The first (e.g., Meg. 14b; Ginzberg, Legends, 4 (1954), 5–8) maintains that she married Joshua after becoming a proselyte, and became the ancestress of eight prophets and priests among whom were the prophet Jeremiah and the prophetess Huldah. According to this tradition, the fact that a proselyte and former prostitute could achieve such a name for herself in the annals of Jewish history proved that repentance can work salvation for anyone no matter how great his past sins. The second tradition contends that Rahab was not a prostitute at all but an innkeeper. This tradition (e.g., Rashi on Josh. 2:1) is based on the Targum's rendering of zonah as pundekita (pundeqita), the assumption being that this word means, like pundakit (pundaqit) in Hebrew, "hostess, innkeeper," and the derivation of the word zonah (normally "prostitute") from the same stem as mazon (מָזוֹן, "food"). If Rahab had been merely an innkeeper, then the shame of considering a former prostitute to be the ancestress of some of Israel's most important figures would cease to be a problem. However, as first noted by Kimḥi (on Josh. 2:1), the adherents of this theory simply misunderstood the Targum, for the Targum to the Prophets in various passages also renders zonah by pundeqētā, plural pundeqāyān or pundeqā'ān (e.g., I Kings 3:16; Ezek. 23:44), in which it cannot possibly have been understood to mean anything but "prostitute." Therefore, the Targum's rendering of Hebrew "prostitute" with Aramaic "innkeeper" is to be understood either as a euphemism or as an intended double entendre, implying that there is a connection between bars or inns and prostitutes.





It appears there is no Jewish tradition linking Rahab and David.

Blessed are You, HaShem, Who blesses the years.
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3 years ago  ::  Apr 08, 2012 - 11:17PM #10
howiedds
Posts: 2,687

dudette:


Ruth would be King David's grandmother



Ruth was David's great grandmother. Boaz and Ruth had Obed. Obed had Jesse. Jesse was the father of David.

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