Post Reply
2 years ago  ::  Mar 28, 2012 - 5:22AM #1
CharikIeia
Posts: 8,301

I was wondering whether the participants here in this forum were aware of the play "Nathan the Wise" by 18th century, enlightenment-era German writer & philosopher G.E. Lessing.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_the_Wise


In modern Germany, pretty much everyone with a higher education knows it, if not by heart, certainly by its humanist message of religious tolerance. Maybe something to add to the vacation reading list, or so.

tl;dr
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Mar 29, 2012 - 6:58AM #2
visio
Posts: 3,287

Mar 28, 2012 -- 5:22AM, CharikIeia wrote:


I was wondering whether the participants here in this forum were aware of the play "Nathan the Wise" by 18th century, enlightenment-era German writer & philosopher G.E. Lessing.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_the_Wise


In modern Germany, pretty much everyone with a higher education knows it, if not by heart, certainly by its humanist message of religious tolerance. Maybe something to add to the vacation reading list, or so.




Was there Internet during Abraham Lincon's era?   Your tagline is on the line for authenticity verification ....so it seems to me.


Back to the point of your Op ....... the setting was 1192.   Oh yes, those were the days when Islamic scholarship was shining up at it's peak, with such a person as Ibn Araby around.   But things have change drastically post 1492.

Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 04, 2012 - 4:16PM #3
IDBC
Posts: 4,500

 


Howdy Chak


Mar 28, 2012 -- 5:22AM, CharikIeia wrote:


I was wondering whether the participants here in this forum were aware of the play "Nathan the Wise" by 18th century, enlightenment-era German writer & philosopher G.E. Lessing.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_the_Wise


In modern Germany, pretty much everyone with a higher education knows it, if not by heart, certainly by its humanist message of religious tolerance. Maybe something to add to the vacation reading list, or so.




I was aware of this story before.  The point of the story as I understand it is that God(the father in the story) loved his three sons(Judiasim, Christianity, Islam) equally.  There originally was one golden ring(scripture). God(the father is in the story)made two other rings(scriptures)that were so similar that it was impossible for any of the sons(Jews-Christians-Muslims) to tell which of the rings was the original ring(scripture).  Only God(the father in the story)knows which of the(rings-scriptures)is the original.  God purposely made those(rings-scriptures) so indentical  in order to promote tolerance.   ONLY God knows which is the original.    NOT any of his sons. 


Problems of religious intolerance occur when the sons(Jews Christians Muslims)insist that they do "know" or "believe" that their ring is the original ring.   That their ring is the best ring and that the other rings are not as good as the copies.  That the sons who have the identical copies of the original ring do not know that the rings that they have are copies either because they are intellectualy or ethically inferior.   There is even claims made that the other sons know that their rings are not the original, that they know that they have the copies, but choose to insist that their rings are the original rings. 


I do not think that Abraham Lincoln or Ibn Araby or even the setting and time is important.     

HAVE A THINKING DAY MAY REASON GUIDE YOU
Quick Reply
Cancel
2 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2012 - 1:59PM #4
BDboy
Posts: 5,560

Mar 28, 2012 -- 5:22AM, CharikIeia wrote:


I was wondering whether the participants here in this forum were aware of the play "Nathan the Wise" by 18th century, enlightenment-era German writer & philosopher G.E. Lessing.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_the_Wise


In modern Germany, pretty much everyone with a higher education knows it, if not by heart, certainly by its humanist message of religious tolerance. Maybe something to add to the vacation reading list, or so.





Thanks.

Quick Reply
Cancel
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook