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Switch to Forum Live View What is Traditional Christianity?
3 years ago  ::  Nov 23, 2011 - 12:00AM #1
subtleguy01
Posts: 2,593

I was mildly rebuked by a good friend for suggesting that Christians of Protestant belief were practicing Traditional Christianity. My friend suggested that Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christianity was Traditional and that Protestants practice of Christianity is non-traditional.

I was curious when reading his thoughts and frankly, I'm still wondering? What is Traditional Christianity and are Christian Protestants practicing it? 

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3 years ago  ::  Nov 23, 2011 - 10:17AM #2
world citizen
Posts: 5,540

I'm not an expert on the subject by any means but, since the (Protestant) Reformation took place 1400 years after the appearance of Christ on earth, and the Roman and Greek churches had been established for almost that many years before the Reformation, it would seem that those two are the "traditional" churches of Christianity.


That being said, it also would seem that with the Protestant removal of the idolotry of saints (statues), relics, etc., the back-to-basics approach of Protestants probably more closely resembles how the faith was practiced in its early days before all the manmade embellishments and rituals were introduced by the "Church."


The argument could go either way.

Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 13, 2011 - 2:56PM #3
GodsGarden
Posts: 107

Let me state a bias up-front.  I generally think any statement that says "Protestants believe..." or "Protestants do...." is inaccurate.  There is much variation among denominations.


 


For me, "traditional christianity" includes the denominations that claim the Apostles' and/or Nicene creed as general statements of faith.  This would include Catholics and well as Anglicans/Episcopalians, and the reformation churches (Lutheran, Methodist, etc).  In general, they have pretty similar liturgies, most believe in the Real Presence in the eucharist/communion, and more-or-less share a litugical calendar and a lectionary that provides for broad coverage of the Bible on a cyclical basis.


 


 

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 16, 2011 - 11:59AM #4
world citizen
Posts: 5,540

GodsGarden ~


Let me state a bias up-front.  I generally think any statement that says "Protestants believe..." or "Protestants do...." is inaccurate.  There is much variation among denominations.


Assuming your post was directed to me...  I made no claim as to how "Protestants believe" or to what "Protestants do" but thought I was correct in stating their "removal of the idolotry of saints (statues), relics, etc."  Is this incorrect?  I might also be wrong then in believing that Protestants don't pray to Mary, the mother of Jesus, as the orthodox churches do.  Please enlighten...

Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 16, 2011 - 1:28PM #5
GodsGarden
Posts: 107

 


WorldCitizen, my response regarding lumping  protestants together was inspired by the original post.  It was not in response to your observations. 


 


 

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3 years ago  ::  Dec 17, 2011 - 9:24PM #6
world citizen
Posts: 5,540

Dec 16, 2011 -- 1:28PM, GodsGarden wrote:

 


WorldCitizen, my response regarding lumping  protestants together was inspired by the original post.  It was not in response to your observations. 


 


 


Thank you for your response, GodsGarden.  Am I correct  in my understanding as shown?  I don't want to offend anyone.  Smile

Blessed is he who mingleth with all men in a spirit of utmost kindliness and love. ~Baha'u'llah
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 26, 2011 - 9:08AM #7
Kalzera
Posts: 260

Coming from a heavily Evangelical background...


it honestly depends on the speaker. Obviously an Academic, as well as a member of any Catholic or Orthodox church, would consider Orthodoxy and any rite of Catholicism as "traditional."


However, Evangelicals have so many different opinions. My grandparents are Evangelical, but they are also strict Lutherans. They don't agree with a lot of Catholic doctrine (obviously), but would consider it "Traditional." But they're also older, and the older generations would think any High Church Christianity is "Traditional." I have a friend who attends an Evangelical, Non-denom Church that advertises itself as "Non-traditional." And many of these Evangelical churches define "Tradition" as hymnals, a quiet service focused on a sermon from a pulpit, and wearing formal attire to Church.  Many of them also seem to be avoiding the word "Church" these days.


 But there's also the matter of whether or not "Traditional" = "Right." For example, I know an Evangelical that would lump the two terms into the same meaning, which means Mormons and JWs aren't "traditional."


I think, within Low-Church Protestantism, there's a common notion that "Traditional" Christianity is any Christianity that believes in "the Bible, the Trinity, and Jesus's death and resurrection." There are those that picture Catholic and Orthodox theology as not being any different from their own, both out of genuine ignorance of those Churches as well as a desire to show the non-Christian world that all Christians think alike.


From an Evangelical perspective, it's kind of hard to answer, both because it depends on what you're trying to accomplish in labeling something "Traditional" and because "Tradition" has different meanings to different Evangelicals.

However men try to reach me, I return their love with my love; whatever path they may travel, it leads to me in the end - Bhagavad Gita 4:11

"Knowledge is a light which God casteth into the heart of whomsoever He willeth" - The Four Valleys; Hadith
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3 years ago  ::  Dec 26, 2011 - 10:03AM #8
Rgurley4
Posts: 8,819

What is "Traditional" "Christianity" ?


Christian = Christ-follower.


"CHURCH" = the collective BODY of true believers who are indwelt by God the Holy Spirit. God the Son ( Jesus the Christ) is its HEAD.
And the "CHURCH" is supra-denominational and without government.


"TRADITION"...
1. "sacred tradition" is more likely to be used in reference to Roman Catholicism.
2. "holy tradition" in reference to Eastern Orthodoxy,
...although the two terms are often interchangeable in meaning.


3. Conservative Christ-followers believe that the Bible is the SUPREME basis for all Christian doctrine when in conflict with "tradition".


The love of the TRI-UNE God is such that God the Father poured out His perfect God the Son, Jesus, to free mankind from sin, death, the burden of the LAW, and yes, even from false and worthless "traditions",
so that the free gift of Grace through God the Holy Spirit-led Faith could be the only provision for salvation unto good works.


Here's how the earliest body of believers manifested their faith...immediately after the "birth" of the "CHURCH" on Pentecost:...
BEFORE the "traditions" of any churchy government...


Acts 2: 44-et seq...


And all those who had BELIEVED were together
and had all things in common; (disregard for materiality)
and they began selling their property and possessions
and were SHARING them with all, as anyone might have need. (neighborly love)
Day by day continuing with one mind in the temple, (Scripture + Prayer)
and breaking bread from house to house, (communion?)
they were taking their meals together with gladness and sincerity of heart, (fellowship)
PRAISING God and
having favor with all the people.
And the Lord was adding to their number day by day those who were being SAVED.

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