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Switch to Forum Live View The Two Creation Accounts Reinforce Multiple Prophetic Scenarios
3 years ago  ::  Sep 26, 2011 - 9:30AM #1
Shubee
Posts: 533

The first two chapters of Genesis provide two very different accounts of Creation.


Firstly, they are contradictory. The sequence of Genesis 1:1 – 2:3 is plants, animals, then man and woman, whereas the sequence of Genesis 2:4 – 25 is man, plants, animals, then woman. Secondly, in the account at Genesis 1, the name of God is “Elohim”(35 times), whereas in the second account the word “God” never appears, but rather “Yahweh” is used (11 times).


There is nothing unusual about this if we understand the entire Bible. The harmony is obvious. Scripture abounds with multiple prophetic scenarios so why be surprised with two distinct accounts of creation? It's an undeniable fact that the book of Daniel weaves together two distinct prophecies, the first one is written in Aramaic and anticipates the world as coming to an end in the days of a divided fourth kingdom (the Roman Empire) and the second scenario, written in Hebrew, envisions the world ending in the period of the divided Greek kingdom. And the book of Revelation foretells of the world possibly ending in the first century (the seals), then in 1844 (the trumpets). But those conclusions are cancelled with the introduction of a third and final scenario in Revelation 12, which extends to an even more distant future.


Moderated by Stardove on Mar 25, 2012 - 06:54PM
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 27, 2011 - 10:07AM #2
Shubee
Posts: 533

This is the end of the first creation account:


Genesis 2
1 Thus the heavens and the earth were completed, and all their hosts. 2 By the seventh day God completed His work which He had done, and He rested on the seventh day from all His work which He had done. 3 Then God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, because in it He rested from all His work which God had created and made.


The second creation account begins as follows:


Genesis 2
4 This is the account of the heavens and the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made earth and heaven. 5 Now no shrub of the field was yet in the earth, and no plant of the field had yet sprouted, for the LORD God had not sent rain upon the earth, and there was no man to cultivate the ground. 6 But a mist used to rise from the earth and water the whole surface of the ground. 7 Then the LORD God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being. 8 The LORD God planted a garden toward the east, in Eden; and there He placed the man whom He had formed. 9 Out of the ground the LORD God caused to grow every tree that is pleasing to the sight and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.


In regard to multiple scenarios in Bible prophecy, note the similarity between the seven trumpet judgments and the seven last plagues.


The inescapable conclusion to be drawn from the chart, i.e., that the traditional Adventist interpretation of the trumpets being ancient history and the seven last plagues being real plagues, is that the orthodox Adventist view of prophecy is completely irrational and indefensible.

Moderated by Stardove on Mar 25, 2012 - 06:53PM
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 28, 2011 - 3:46PM #3
Shubee
Posts: 533

One more argument that supports multiple scenarios is the New Testament expectation that the end of the world was to be in the lifetime of the Apostles.

Moderated by Stardove on Mar 25, 2012 - 06:53PM
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3 years ago  ::  Sep 28, 2011 - 11:25PM #4
Shubee
Posts: 533

Two stories or one?


Until the latter half of the 19th century, Genesis 1 and 2 were seen as one continuous, uniform story with Genesis 1:1–2:6 outlining the world's origin, and 2:7–2:25 carefully painting a more detailed picture of the creation of humanity. Modern scholarship, citing (1) the use of two different names for God, (2) two different emphases (physical vs. moral issues), and (3) a different order of creation (plants before humans vs. plants after humans), believes that these are two distinct scriptures written many years apart by two different sources, chapter 1 by the Priestly source and chapter 2 by the Jahwist, with the bridge the work of a "redactor", or editor.


- Metzger, Bruce M.; Murphy, Roland E., eds (1991). "Annotation to Genesis 2:4b". The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha (Revised edition ed.). USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 2048. ISBN 0195283562.


- Metzger, Bruce M.; Coogan, Michael D., eds (1993). The Oxford Companion to the Bible (First Printing ed.). Oxford University Press,. pp. 932. ISBN 0195046455.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_creation_n...

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3 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2011 - 11:04PM #5
Discerner
Posts: 1,722

The Genesis account of creation contains no contradictory accounts of the creative process. The account of creation in Genesis 1 provides the sequence of the creative process for each day, but provides very little explanation as to procedures and/or details. The account in Genesis 2 provides an explanation of the creative process by providing a more detailed exegesis of creation events, but not necessarily in the sequential order of creation. The fact that they are not sequential as is Genesis 1, neither chapter provides evidence that they are directly in contravention to each other, nor are they supposed to be parallel in a sequential explanation of the creative process.

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