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Switch to Forum Live View A saint for our times?
5 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2010 - 5:48PM #1
cherubino
Posts: 7,277

Or is Fr. Flanagan of Boys Town fame just another dissenter of yore who's currently being co-opted by troublemakers to promote some covert agenda of their own? For better or worse, I suppose, Spencer Tracy's portayal of him in the movies will eclipse the real man in the popular imagination: www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNqFqinW32Y


But isn't that necessarily part of the hagiographic scenario here? It seems to me that Catholicism has become in recent decades a religion of nothing more than sex regulation, bioethics and socio-political bandwagons to legislate same, a church whose whiny & incessant tsk tsks are actually eroding any sort of moral leadership it once enjoyed on the world stage. I mean, how long has it been since they've canonized a saint who had any real fire in his belly, whose moral vision never faltered and who called his fellow clergy out on the mat over child abuse?


By contrast, there's something intrinsically insipid about Mother Teresa, J-P II, Pius XII, Escrivá and even Newman, something that suggests they all sold out to the Establishment and then spent the rest of their lives trying to justify it to themselves. None of that really struck home with me until I found this piece yesterday on a new grassroots movement in Nebraska to get Fr. Flanagan canonized, and-- whew-- what a difference in character and the whole definition of sanctity he represents when lined up with the others.


Anyway, details here:






 

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2010 - 6:10PM #2
gilg
Posts: 5,200

Isn't this the same guy that visited Ireland and deplored the conditons at Catholic run institutions? Nope, not saint material.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2010 - 6:19PM #3
tmore35
Posts: 149

Hi Cherubino,


 


Yes, I think Fr. Flanagan is a good choice for canonization.  I don't compare the saints, or measure them up one against the other.


 


Our pup would probably approve.  2 1/2 years ago after forty years of being a household with cats for pets, I told my husband thatI wouldn't mind if he could got a dog.  We went to the local shelter and adopted a cute black and tan dog--larger than I wanted, but nice looking.  The shelter experience reminded him of Fr. Flanagan, Whitey Marsh, and Boystown.  The black and tan orphan dog didn't fit the name "Whitey" or "March" either, so he would up being named Rooney.


Every so often, just for fun, I'll call my husband "Tracey".

Pax et Bonum!
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5 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2010 - 6:20PM #4
cherubino
Posts: 7,277

Mar 2, 2010 -- 6:10PM, gilg wrote:


Isn't this the same guy that visited Ireland and deplored the conditions at Catholic run institutions? Nope, not saint material.




Yes, that story is in the last link above:


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5 years ago  ::  Mar 02, 2010 - 11:53PM #5
hewy1952
Posts: 2,454

Mar 2, 2010 -- 6:19PM, tmore35 wrote:


Hi Cherubino,


 


Yes, I think Fr. Flanagan is a good choice for canonization.  I don't compare the saints, or measure them up one against the other.


 


Our pup would probably approve.  2 1/2 years ago after forty years of being a household with cats for pets, I told my husband thatI wouldn't mind if he could got a dog.  We went to the local shelter and adopted a cute black and tan dog--larger than I wanted, but nice looking.  The shelter experience reminded him of Fr. Flanagan, Whitey Marsh, and Boystown.  The black and tan orphan dog didn't fit the name "Whitey" or "March" either, so he would up being named Rooney.


Every so often, just for fun, I'll call my husband "Tracey".





Tmore:


We adopted a black and tan cat from a Doctor friend, with whom I used to (occasionally) drink a 'black and tan', him being Irish and all (and me English).  But it worked.


We named the cat (may she rest in peace) for our beloved time together--Guinness (and Harp).  Best cat we ever had.  35 pounds of Irish humor, grace beyond measure, and an occasional sip of 'me foam. 


Good luck with your adoption!

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 12:38AM #6
jane2
Posts: 14,295

Mar 2, 2010 -- 5:48PM, cherubino wrote:


Or is Fr. Flanagan of Boys Town fame just another dissenter of yore who's currently being co-opted by troublemakers to promote some covert agenda of their own? For better or worse, I suppose, Spencer Tracy's portayal of him in the movies will eclipse the real man in the popular imagination: www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNqFqinW32Y


But isn't that necessarily part of the hagiographic scenario here? It seems to me that Catholicism has become in recent decades a religion of nothing more than sex regulation, bioethics and socio-political bandwagons to legislate same, a church whose whiny & incessant tsk tsks are actually eroding any sort of moral leadership it once enjoyed on the world stage. I mean, how long has it been since they've canonized a saint who had any real fire in his belly, whose moral vision never faltered and who called his fellow clergy out on the mat over child abuse?


There is such a truth in this. Father Flanagan was so special fo his dedication to his work and what he saw of his calling. It worked in a difficult time.


 


 


 


By contrast, there's something intrinsically insipid about Mother Teresa, J-P II, Pius XII, Escrivá and even Newman, something that suggests they all sold out to the Establishment and then spent the rest of their lives trying to justify it to themselves. None of that really struck home with me until I found this piece yesterday on a new grassroots movement in Nebraska to get Fr. Flanagan canonized, and-- whew-- what a difference in character and the whole definition of sanctity he represents when lined up with the others. There is some real irony there.The canonizations of few in the last thirty year has struck any meaningful chord with most of us. From Fr.Flanagan we can look at a long ministry  that made a difference for poor American boys and it rings a small bell that we also might do something on whatever scale. That we are our brother's keeper remains with most of us.


Kudos, Gilg, for the story of Fr. Flannagan chastising the Irish Church and Government about the conditions in this Irish industrial schools, etc. Thanks to Cherubino for presting it.


 


Anyway, details here:






 




Great topic so well presented.


Jane

discuss catholicism
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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 8:37AM #7
Marcion
Posts: 2,883

IMHO those deserving sainthood are, Fr Flanagan, Fr Damian, Fulton Sheen and JohnXXIII.


The notion of canonization of PiusXII nauseates me. 

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 9:51AM #8
WaveringCC
Posts: 5,130

Mar 3, 2010 -- 8:37AM, Marcion wrote:


IMHO those deserving sainthood are, Fr Flanagan, Fr Damian, Fulton Sheen and JohnXXIII.


The notion of canonization of PiusXII nauseates me. 




Why Fulton Sheen?

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 11:18AM #9
David
Posts: 287

Mar 2, 2010 -- 5:48PM, cherubino wrote:

Or is Fr. Flanagan of Boys Town fame just another dissenter of yore who's currently being co-opted by troublemakers to promote some covert agenda of their own? For better or worse, I suppose, Spencer Tracy's portayal of him in the movies will eclipse the real man in the popular imagination: www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNqFqinW32Y


But isn't that necessarily part of the hagiographic scenario here? It seems to me that Catholicism has become in recent decades a religion of nothing more than sex regulation, bioethics and socio-political bandwagons to legislate same, a church whose whiny & incessant tsk tsks are actually eroding any sort of moral leadership it once enjoyed on the world stage. I mean, how long has it been since they've canonized a saint who had any real fire in his belly, whose moral vision never faltered and who called his fellow clergy out on the mat over child abuse?


By contrast, there's something intrinsically insipid about Mother Teresa, J-P II, Pius XII, Escrivá and even Newman, something that suggests they all sold out to the Establishment and then spent the rest of their lives trying to justify it to themselves. None of that really struck home with me until I found this piece yesterday on a new grassroots movement in Nebraska to get Fr. Flanagan canonized, and-- whew-- what a difference in character and the whole definition of sanctity he represents when lined up with the others.


Anyway, details here:






 






I can see your point..I go to Mass for the Sacraments and Reconciliation...I don't go for the boring homilies which are nothing but the same old, same old...always asking for more...what have you done for God and the Church lately...the Church has become what Christ condemned in the Pharasees...too much pomp and paying lip service to what the Holy Spirit has called the Church to be...always about money..money..money...

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5 years ago  ::  Mar 03, 2010 - 1:44PM #10
quondamonachus
Posts: 400

Cherub,


I'll go with Flanagan and suggest another saint for our times: his last name escapes me for the moment, but Fr. Pete, SJ was an assistant pastor at my parish in the '50s and was instrumental in exposing the corruption and abuse of workers on the NY docks. As you know, Fr. Pete was magnificently portrayed by the inimitable late Carl Maulden in On the Waterfront.

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