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Switch to Forum Live View compare and contrast the meanings of the names of God
5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 12:29PM #1
Yusha
Posts: 10

In the Jewish  scriptures YHWH is the  unspeakable name for God. It's meaning is  something like this 'I shall  be as I shall be' or 'I am that I am'.  Jesus prayed to YHWH but called  him 'abba' which means 'father' in  aramaic.


 


Now one of the holy names of Allah is  pronounced  al-Hayul Qayum ... which means 'the Ever Living, the One Who  sustains  and protects all that exists' ... compare this with 'I shall  be as I  shall be'... does anyone see a common thread?


 


So I asked myself ... did God Almighty have   sexual desire for the Virgin Mary and did they produce offspring which   is half god/man which makes up 1/3 of a trinity? And I said no. There  is  only one God. Jesus had no biological father, however he did have a   spiritual father (that being God).




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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 1:21PM #2
ffb
Posts: 2,167

In Judaism, god has many names -- in fact, some would say that every letter and every word is a name of god. Each name points to a different aspect of god and as god is infinite, the variety of names is likewise infinite. The 4 letter name you refer to has one meaning and if that overlaps with the senses that are called forth by the way god is named in other religions then that's fine. But, other religion's names for god are not part of judaism.

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 2:51PM #3
nieciedo
Posts: 5,617

Is it me, or is something lost in translation here?


The Tetragrammaton (YHWH) is the third person singular masculine imperfective of the causative construction of the verb "to be" and means "He causes/has been causing/will cause to be."


You seem to be confusing that with the phrase "Ehyeh-asher-ehyey," which is likewise treated as a proper name in the book of Exodus. This is notoriously difficult to translate. "Ehyeh" is the first person singular imperfective of the basic construction of the verb "to be" and mean "I am" or "I will be" or "I will become" etc. "Asher" is the relative particle that transforms the clause of the verb that follows into a modifier of the noun or pronoun or implied subject that precedes it. "I am who am" (I am the One that exists, I am the One for Whom existence is a necessary and not a tangential quality). Other possibilities are "I am who I am" or "I will be what I will be" and so forth.


Arabic al-Hayu 'l-qayyum is exactly cognate to Hebrew he-Hay haqqayyam, "the Living and Enduring One."


What all of this has to do with Jesus -- and what Jesus's alleged parentage has to do with names of God or Judaism -- completely escapes me.

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 4:54PM #4
LeahOne
Posts: 16,255

Likewise, what does any of this have to do with Judaism????


Maybe these replies should be attached to the identical thread which has been posted over at DMJ......

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 6:50PM #5
Yusha
Posts: 10

I made these connections all by myself while reading the english translations of the scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. I guess it does lose quite a bit in the translations but I was looking at the meanings behind the words. The greatest name for God in Hebrew is YHWH, and  I thought it meant 'I shall be as I shall be'.


I made the connection that when translated into english. The phrase conveys: Majesty, Autonomy, Living Eternally... it carries with it, great power.


And when I read the name for Allah ... al-hayul qayum -- when it's meaning is translated into english, The Ever Living, the One Who sustains and protects all that exists, I also see the same connotations to Majesty, Autonomy, and Living Eternally.


I also wanted to fit Christianity into the mix by stating that Jesus prayed to YHWH, and this is in their New Testament in the scenes where he prayed ... was he praying to himself? no he was praying to God, who he referred to as 'abba.' He did not break Jewish law by pronouncing the name. No what Jesus did was expound upon the 'malKUta dishmaYA', the kingdom of the Heavens. The kingdom of his 'father' ... aka YHWH his spiritual father not biological Father.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 7:22PM #6
LeahOne
Posts: 16,255

"He did not break Jewish law by pronouncing the name."


There was a law against that????  I never knew.....  I just assumed that the Tetrangrammeton couldn't be pronounced correctly unless one knew the proper vowel marks.  You see, the Hebrew letters represented by the 'Y' 'H' and 'V' are each SILENT without the vowel marks.  So the word 'YHVH' literally DOES NOT MAKE A SOUND.


I also don't understand why you stop with the Abrahamic faiths - why not explore the Names of Deity in other faith traditions as well?

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 8:49PM #7
ffb
Posts: 2,167

" The greatest name for God in Hebrew is YHWH"


I'm not seeing how that is developed. Not only are the english letters poor connections to the Hebrew, and not only is the pronunciation unknown to us (and, by tradition, would have been something that only the high priest would say), but saying that one name is "greater" than any other makes no sense. That's like setting up 10 arrows all pointing to the same picture and saying that one arrow is greater than the others. How is that measured?

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 27, 2010 - 8:52PM #8
Yusha
Posts: 10

I guess why I stop at the Abrahamic faiths because they share the same root.


But I stick with my english translations of the Tanach, the Holy Bible, and the Quran.


I think the true believers have a genuine fear of God and that is pleasing in the eyes of the Creator, that (fear of God) accompanied by good works and the preservation of morals.

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 28, 2010 - 9:54AM #9
nieciedo
Posts: 5,617

Jan 27, 2010 -- 8:49PM, ffb wrote:


" The greatest name for God in Hebrew is YHWH"


I'm not seeing how that is developed. Not only are the english letters poor connections to the Hebrew, and not only is the pronunciation unknown to us (and, by tradition, would have been something that only the high priest would say), but saying that one name is "greater" than any other makes no sense. That's like setting up 10 arrows all pointing to the same picture and saying that one arrow is greater than the others. How is that measured?





Perhaps it can be measured by the degree of caution and respect with which it is treated? The Tetragrammaton is "greater" than other names because it is the Deity's specific personal name for Itself. There is a reason why its pronunciation was gradually restricted only to the Temple liturgy and then eventually only to the purification of the Holy of Holies on Yom Kippur. It is also the only name which came to be replaced with euphemisms until the original pronunciation was lost to living tradition. There are even people who refuse to even say or write "Yud-Heh-Vav-Heh" and use "Yud-Keh-Vav-Keh" instead.


 

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5 years ago  ::  Jan 28, 2010 - 8:59PM #10
ffb
Posts: 2,167

in that the shem hameforash had a specific use in temple ritual and was considered special for that purpose, the name could be considered different from other names (though the begadim of the cohen kadol were special for him but i wouldn't call them greater than other clothes, just specially designated).  there are names which we are never supposed to even try and pronounce -- ones which in prayer our eyes are supposed to scan but our lips never pronounce. Does that make these names "greater" in that there is some forbidden mystical level and even the cohen gadol wouldn't pronounce them? does one name give the average person a higher connection or more precise access to god than another name? is one to be treated with a different sanctity from another today because it is "more" a name of god? Eastern European Jews spoke yiddish and forbade hebrew for conversation because every word was supposed to be in lashon hakodesh as a name of god (since the world was created through lashon hakodesh). so a word's being used for the avodah and therefore being "greater" would be tantamount to saying that the animal made hekdesh is "greater" -- but it isn't, just different. Unless you redefine "greater."

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