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Switch to Forum Live View What does the Unitarian Universalist religion believe in and what are the services?
6 years ago  ::  Oct 08, 2008 - 5:18PM #1
Ilovethelord
Posts: 74
What does the Unitarian Universalist religion believe in and what are the services like compared to Christian churches like let's mine, Christian Church( Disciples of Christ).? Thank you and peace.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 11, 2008 - 11:16AM #2
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833
Your question about what Unitarian Universalists believe is basically unanswerable since each individual is free to study various religions and search out what beliefs are meaningful for hirself. Thus, there really isn't any "This is it" as most other faiths have, such as for instance, "We believe that Jesus was the only Son of God, who died for our sins and was resurrected." State any single belief, and you'll have UU's who would agree with it or some of it and any number who would deny it outright.

That being said, the following links may help to give you a sense of what Unitarian Universalism is about:

There are various threads here where people have asked questions similar to yours, thus, probably the best place to start: Welcome Center on UUism

This links to a similar thread appearing in the UU Community forum: UU service content

A question about UU Sunday School: Sunday School

And finally, a view of UU tolerance with a question by a prospective visitor about how likely a gay person is to feel welcomed to a UU church: UU Tolerance and Diversity

If you have other questions, I suggest starting a thread in the UU Community area or adding your questions to an existing one. You're more likely to get a prompt answer there although the boards have been rather quiet just lately.

Hope these links give you the information you seek.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 13, 2008 - 11:11AM #3
Evillynnstar
Posts: 531
The way I describe UU to others is that we accept that there are many different kinds of faiths and cultures out in the world. Rather than fight over who is right and who is wrong, we have come accept that its better to embrace one another and learn from each other. UUs encourage others to learn about other belief systems and often during the services they try to throw in the doctrine wisdom of as many faiths as possible. It encourages that all are welcome and they share a proud history as being the descended of the same church many of our American Founding fathers belong too. UU can be jewish, christian, pagan, muslim, atheist, or anything else for the most part. The point is to belong to community and to share our different ways, rather than fight.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 14, 2008 - 7:52PM #4
Ursyl
Posts: 462
The average service at our UU follows a pattern of opening music, announcements, lighting the Chalice, music, Joys and Concerns, the actual topic, closing.

Topics vary from Bible history to Native American teachings, Buddhism, other cultures, Green living, remembering our loved ones, guided meditation, how the political system works, etc. If we get really lucky, we may get to have a Zoroastrian speaker at some point in the future.

Just about anything is fair game.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 30, 2008 - 8:01PM #5
PeaceLoveandUnderstanding
Posts: 116
I used to be a Unitarian Universalist and I did like things in the UU Church, however I am now in a Church called Assemblies of God and the main reason why is the UU Church just compromised a lot and I found out that personally I believe Jesus Christ is lord and the Son of God through miracles.
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 03, 2008 - 8:54PM #6
Amadon
Posts: 17
Hi, I'm a UU theist.  I find that the UU church is open to all beliefs or those with no beliefs.  It has a social gospel rather than a religious gospel.  We get along because we don't try try to convert others to our beliefs but we do discuss our beliefs.

There are in fact UU Christian churches, mostly in the northeast, but their take on God and Jesus is not the same as the traditional Christian dogma.

UU churches are very much into outreach in both the world and the community.  Their outreach consists of supporting those who are victims of politics and violence, like the folks in Darfur.  Many UU's support Amnesty International.  Many UU's are also into ecology and saving the earth.

As a theist, I'm in the minority in my church, but there is no stigma attached to being different.  We have theists, deists, pagans, Buddhists, agnostics, atheists and more in our church.  Because I can't accept some of the Christian dogma, I find the UU church is the only place I'm comfortable.

Namaste, Dick
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 22, 2008 - 12:07PM #7
gustavus
Posts: 1
"In the love of truth and the spirit of Jesus,
we unite for the worship of God and the service of all," is a typical covenant of many Unitarian Universalist churches.
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6 years ago  ::  Nov 24, 2008 - 7:59AM #8
DotNotInOz
Posts: 6,833

gustavus wrote:

"In the love of truth and the spirit of Jesus,
we unite for the worship of God and the service of all," is a typical covenant of many Unitarian Universalist churches.



It certainly hasn't been in the half dozen or so UU churches I've ever attended, three of which I was a member of for more than a year.

That sounds far more like a creed than any UU church I've been associated with would use. It's a statement that might be used occasionally, especially as part of a historical or theistic service theme, but is not at all one that would be typical.

Now, it's possible that you've encountered such a statement used regularly in one of the historically UU Christian churches, most of which are in the Northeast or Mid-Atlantic regions of the U.S., or so I've been told. Elsewhere, it would be highly atypical.

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6 years ago  ::  Nov 28, 2008 - 8:18PM #9
Ursyl
Posts: 462
[QUOTE]"In the love of truth and the spirit of Jesus,
we unite for the worship of God and the service of all," is a typical covenant of many Unitarian Universalist churches.[/QUOTE]That would certainly EXCLUDE a goodly percentage of the membership of the UU I attend.

Same for the other UUs with which I am passingly familiar in our district.

Maybe this was the covenant in the past? Now we've got the 7 Principles and the different sources of inspiration---which go way beyond Jesus and the Abrahamic God.

They're included of course, but no longer the sole source of inspiration.
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