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Switch to Forum Live View Oriental and Eastern Orthodox Unity?
6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 2:02AM #1
Solidgranit
Posts: 34
Are the oriental and eastern Orthodox Churches in communion presently?
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 1:16PM #2
Seraphim
Posts: 504
No, not at present though there a little fudging at the edges where they exist in close proximity. There is a great deal of mutual respect though. In most regards our faith and its practice are indistinguishable allowing for cultural variations such as exist between Orthodox who are Russians and Greeks or Romanians.  The main sticking points are in how we express our Christology.  Just speaking for myself, I think our understanding is virtually the same, but we each insist upon a particular emphasis within that understanding, which for a variety of reasons...some just tides of history that have remained unresolved for 1500 years.   It is not unusual to see Copts worshiping at Orthodox temples when none of their own are near.

To illustrate just how close we are on most points: If a Protestant converts to Orthodoxy they will have to be catechized and may have to be baptised. Some Protestants and Catholics (as rule) who convert will be catechized but need only to be chrismated before they can commune. A Non-Chalcedonian (Copt/Syrian, Armenian, Mar Toma) who converts to Orthodox need only give an Orthodox confession of the faith.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 5:02PM #3
Solidgranit
Posts: 34
That is interesting because there is a Coptic Orthodox Church near me and one of the Priest's there told me that the two Churches are in communion...
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 01, 2008 - 5:26PM #4
Seraphim
Posts: 504
That is surprising. There has been a lot of talk and consultations about it for the past few years, and there was a big conference at Balamand that set the framework for discussion further how things could be worked out...but it was not that enthusiastially received.  Pope Shenouda III is not at present up for endorsing Chalcedon or the 6th Council and I don't think the Orthodox are willing to dismiss or diminish Chalcedon. 

I think it is safe to say we are closer to reunion that any time since the schism. There is lots of friendly feeling, but its not a done deal, and there is no easy way forward that I can see at this point.
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 02, 2008 - 12:24AM #5
Solidgranit
Posts: 34
What would you say of the debates regarding re-unification?  I understand it could be viewed as denying or at the least challenging the authority of the ecumenical councils and thus the presence and work of the Holy Spirit, but shouldn't there be a solution that is compatible for both sides?
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 02, 2008 - 12:24AM #6
Solidgranit
Posts: 34
What would you say of the debates regarding re-unification?  I understand it could be viewed as denying or at the least challenging the authority of the ecumenical councils and thus the presence and work of the Holy Spirit, but shouldn't there be a solution that is compatible for both sides?
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 02, 2008 - 10:56AM #7
SeraphimR
Posts: 9,382
Here is a website devoted to the Eastern/Oriental Orthodox issues

http://www.orthodoxunity.org

but I don't know how current it is.


I have read that the biggest obstacle to unity is not so much problems with theology, but the fact that the Oriental Orthodox have canonized Saints who were anathematized by the rest of the Church (which was undivided at the time).
People with a mission to save the earth want the earth to seem worse than it is so their mission will look more important.


P.J. O'Rourke
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6 years ago  ::  Oct 02, 2008 - 11:01AM #8
Seraphim
Posts: 504
I think it is good to have and to continue the discussions, but I think both sides agree that the only basis for untity that we can have must be the truth.  The Church is not just a social organization, it is the Body of Christ and as such it must be true to itself. Neither of us wants a unity that compromises the truth about Christ just for the sake of a joint round of Kumbyah.  And there is also the human factor to consider...to reunify one side has to say that on XYZ major concerns we have been largely in the wrong for 1500 years and you in the right.  I don't care how charitable one might be personally...that's a lot of history to swallow.  There may be some ways to save face available...but still there needs be a capitulation of one side or the other, primarily because there are so few points of theology that seperate us...there's not a lot of groud to offer give and take compromises.

In God's time the right leadership and the right circumstances on the ground will enable this thing to be resolved. In the interim while cognizant and mindful of our differences we can still be charitible and respectful of each other...again especially since on so much we are in agreement. And we can pray that God hasten the day.
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6 years ago  ::  Dec 21, 2008 - 3:57PM #9
razzputin
Posts: 119
Hey Solid,
Jest between you n' me, I say da more da better.  Bring 'em all in!  More Choiches ta go to,  an more good food ta sample!  Nestorians, Coptics, Armenians, Chaldeans, Monophysites, Monothelites, Circumcellions, Marcians, Donatists, whatever...   I'll bet dey all can cook!    Hell if ya can find some old fashioned Arians hangin' around somewhere, bring 'em too!  I got plenty o room at the ranch!  We'll get drunk, argue, eat (maybe brand and cut a few calves or shear some sheep!)  Hey! Maybe we'll even dance the Xoro!  I ain't one ta let some musty old dogma get in the way of a good party!
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