Post Reply
Switch to Forum Live View Gender and Sexuality?
6 years ago  ::  Apr 17, 2008 - 9:47AM #1
Truth27
Posts: 523
Hi,

I'm not exactly clear on this, but, as I understand it, many African cultures/religions, due in part to the communal agricultural tradition, are very oriented towards having children and propogating the lineage.  This may explain why African women are so disenfranchised from control over their reproduction in many cases.  Along this vein, this may be why same sex relationships are so frowned upon (to the point of being punishable by the death penalty in places like Nigeria I've heard).  Here in the states, I've heard of Yoruba traditions that are welcoming to same sex relationships.  They also allow women control over their reproduction.  However, at least with regards to alternative sexuality, this is frowned upon even among many Yoruba circles in the US.  How can an update on these religions such that they adjust to the times be achieved?

Peace.
Quick Reply
Cancel
6 years ago  ::  Jul 07, 2008 - 11:43AM #2
Buddhamom08
Posts: 15
Hi Truth, when you speak of adjusting a religious mind set to something that has been a taboo for so long, it is a challenge.  However, it starts with education, which may help to foster compassion, and acceptance.

Many cultures believe that female sexuality as well as same sex relationships are considered un-natural or immoral.  This ideal is taught out of many religious belief systems. But what is the truth behind it all?  Could this be an object of control?  Maybe?

However, if we study the physiology of behavior and understand the makeup of the brain and the biochemicals/peptides and hormones that it produces (or possibly do not produce), we may gain a better perspective of sexual behavior, and then, maybe as a society or a culture we can start to re-educate others that same sex relationships is not a matter of morality (or immorality as many think) but a matter of bio-physiology. Or that a female being in tune with her sexual-self does not make her a whore, but a human who knows her body and what pleases her sexual needs.
Quick Reply
Cancel
6 years ago  ::  Dec 13, 2008 - 3:54PM #3
Latefordinner
Posts: 2
I agree that they are un natural. I admit I do not understand it because I do not have that inclination but it just does not seem right.
Quick Reply
Cancel
5 years ago  ::  Jan 01, 2010 - 1:15PM #4
Bairre
Posts: 122

Apr 17, 2008 -- 9:47AM, Truth27 wrote:

Hi, I'm not exactly clear on this, but, as I understand it, many African cultures/religions, due in part to the communal agricultural tradition, are very oriented towards having children and propogating the lineage. This may explain why African women are so disenfranchised from control over their reproduction in many cases. Along this vein, this may be why same sex relationships are so frowned upon (to the point of being punishable by the death penalty in places like Nigeria I've heard). Here in the states, I've heard of Yoruba traditions that are welcoming to same sex relationships. They also allow women control over their reproduction. However, at least with regards to alternative sexuality, this is frowned upon even among many Yoruba circles in the US. How can an update on these religions such that they adjust to the times be achieved? Peace.



Well, there are many cultures throughout the world that view homosexuality as unnatural or immoral, Africans aren't the only ones.  However, it is far more common among Christian and Muslim Africans than it is among Africans who practice Traditional Religions.  That's not to say that all Traditional Religions are open to homosexuality, but it is often seen as far less of a taboo than to Muslims and Christians.


This is also true in regards to female sexuality.  Many animist and polytheistic and even some monotheistic Traditional religions are very open to female sexuality.  Again, this isn't in general, but it isn't uncommon.  Nigeria is primarily Muslim (estimated 50% or population) and Christian (40%) with only 10% following other religions which include Judaism, Hinduism, as well as Tradtional African Religions, and in Islam homosexuality is punishable by death.  It is also true that Islam doesn't have the best record in regards to gender equality.  Neither, for that matter, does Christianity have a good record when it comes to gender equality or sexual freedom.


So, I don't think that the argument should be toward Traditional African Religions as they are marginal in most of Africa with a few exceptions.  Yoruba isn't the only Traditional African Religion, also, there are many.  And the areas where Tradition African Religions are practiced are often (though not always) more egalitarian in regards to your concerns.

Quick Reply
Cancel
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook