Post Reply
Page 1 of 2  •  1 2 Next
Switch to Forum Live View
Announcement: Welcome
7 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 1:53AM #1
Marysara722
Posts: 2,550
Hello and Welcome to the Eastern Orthodoxy Forum.

This is the place to Discuss, Dialogue and Debate the Eastern Orthodox Faith & Practices.

Please take a moment to "introduce" yourself to the board. :)

It there is an interesting thread topic from the old EO board, feel free to
copy & paste the Opening Post, and re-post it into a new thread.

Thanks, and welcome aboard the new Bnet! ;)

MSara
Beliefnet Comm. Host

*************
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 2:09AM #2
itsacrucifiction
Posts: 2,687
Sorry to butt in, but I was curious as to what MarySara722 is doing here. I thought you only moderated that one really caustic (hopefully) board that we all know and love. What are you doing here on this board, if I may ask?
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Oct 18, 2007 - 9:58AM #3
Marysara722
Posts: 2,550

itsacrucifiction wrote:

Sorry to butt in, but I was curious as to what MarySara722 is doing here. I thought you only moderated that one really caustic (hopefully) board that we all know and love. What are you doing here on this board, if I may ask?



Hi Itsa, no I'm not a Host over here but just providing a "Welcome" thread here and there on a few boards that haven't had any invisitors a/o yet so the real newbie membes don't feel unwelcomed to our new website is all.
Yet it's good to see you here of all places though. ;)

Hang Loose, :)
MS


**************

Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Dec 05, 2007 - 1:08AM #4
Seraphim
Posts: 504
Welcome. There are not many Orthodox here yet, but I'm sure those that are would be willing to help with any questions you might have. What we don't know we can try to find out for you.
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Jan 23, 2008 - 11:23PM #5
catkorn
Posts: 1
Hi. I am Orthodox and have been raised in Rocor since I was 3 when my mother converted. I didn't know very many Orthodox kids growing up and when I was older, there were not any young Orthodox men to date. I married a non-Orthodox man and we have been married 13 years. We have 2 daughters, who have been baptised and are being raised in the church. I worry that my girls will be in the same situation I found myself in. Being married to a non-Orthodox person has been very difficult on our marriage. He converted 2 years ago, but quickly turned away from the church. Please keep my family in your prayer. In Christ, Christine
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Feb 04, 2008 - 11:19PM #6
Joseph14
Posts: 119
What is the difference between Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodox? I know little about either one.

Joseph14
Quick Reply
Cancel
7 years ago  ::  Feb 05, 2008 - 12:59PM #7
WitnessNJ
Posts: 144

Joseph14 wrote:

What is the difference between Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodox? I know little about either one.


   
   
  This is not an easy question to answer, they were both part of the same Church for the first 1000 years of Christianity.  So, in many ways they are the same.  They both hold on to Holy Tradition taught by Christ and handed down through the Church by the Holy Spirit, although Christians of the East (Orthodoxy) believe that the West (Catholicism), added to the faith. 
   
  Some claim that Orthodoxy is more spiritual than Catholicism, and Catholicism is more legalistic than Orthodoxy.   Other differences are that Orthodoxy is more local, every bishop is united to the Church by unity of faith. In the west, bishops seem to be united  by unity with the bishop of Rome.
   
  There are differences in Theology also. We have different understandings on the Trinity, original sin, and liturgics. 
   
  Hope this helps, you can ask more specific questions here or on the Eastern Orthodox forum.
                                           
Andy

Quick Reply
Cancel
6 years ago  ::  May 20, 2008 - 10:02AM #8
anyuta64
Posts: 1,536
Hi, Sisk22.

you ask some good questions.  first of all, a married man can indeed become a priest.  at one time it was even encouraged for parish priests to be married.  celibate priests generally would stay in monastic communities (but not always). 

However, when it comes to choosing a bshop, only the celibate priesthood is looked to. they can have been married at one time, and been widowed, but they can't be married at the time of elevation to bisihop. I don't know of any exeptions, but I'm sure one can be found somewehre if one looks hard enough, there would have to have been some very very compelling reason.

celibacy is not prized over marriage for priests (as I mentioned--their roles are different).  they must make that choice prior to ordination, as someone who is already a priest can not get married.

tribalism.  yes. sadly, it can happen. however, there are many Orthodox parishes which are very inclusive, and may even have a predominance of convers who don't fit into the usual national groups.  OCA and Antiochan chruches are probably most likely to have such communities, but other groups may as well.. depending on the specific parish. for example, the ROCR parish I grew up in now has a very large and very active "american" congregation, as well as a russian congregation, and have services in two languages (separately on normal weeks, together on holidays).  when the services are together, it's roughly half and half english/slavonic.

what would you like to know about the icon wall? it's called an iconostasis, and is really just an elaboration of the "altar rail".  the wall has three doors in it, one in the middle called the royal doors that is used only at special times during the service, and two on the sides called "deacons doors" used more frequently by clrgy and altare servers.  the iconostasis can be simple or quite elaborate, and there asre some rules about which icons go where on it.  It's usually quiet beautiful.  the royal doors are usually open euring much of the service, so people can see what's going on.. but the Orthodox service isn't meant to be entertainment for the people, but worhsip of God, therefore the priest faces the same direction as the people (with his back to the people much of the time), and seeing what is going on is not empahsised (although you do see much of it, despite the iconostasis.

hope that helps
Passion is inversely proportional to the amount of real information available.

NOTE: This post is a natural product. The sleight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual charicter and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws or defects.
Quick Reply
Cancel
6 years ago  ::  Nov 21, 2008 - 12:40AM #9
Huson
Posts: 44
Hello,

I did not grow up with any particular faith.  As an adult I "became a Christian" in a small Baptist church in North Carolina.  Along the way I went to California Baptist College (now University) and received a BS in Business.  Also went to Fuller Semimary, Pasadena, CA and received an MA in Theology.  I am married and have five children.

Over most of this time, about 25 years, I have been a Protestant, mostly Baptist, Christian.  Some years back the fact that there are many Protestant denominations, and that they do not all believe the same thing, began to bother me.  I was introduced to Catholicism and found that it answered many of my questions.   

In researching Catholicism I "discovered" Orthodoxy.  (I think I always knew that the Eastern Orthodox were there, but just never felt that they had anything to offer me.)  As I looked a bit at Orthodoxy I saw that it too went back to the Apostles.  Since, for me, the significance of Apostolic Succession was a major point I realized that I had to take a serious look at Orthodoxy.

Please note that while many of my questions may have Catholic underpinnings I do not intend to argue the Catholic position.  My purpose here is to learn about Orthodoxy, not to try and convince you of Catholicism.

Huson
Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 1 of 2  •  1 2 Next
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook