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7 years ago  ::  Nov 07, 2007 - 5:58PM #1
StarLight
Posts: 21
I was just wondering do more people have a monotheistic view of polytheistic or somewhere in between. I consider myself to be pagan, but I still haven't figured out if I believe in multiple god/desses or not. I like the idea of one universal Light but then how does Mother Earth play into that? At this point I see gods, saints, and even just some good people as either different manifestations of one god (which I haven't exactly figured out is female or both male and female, i feel like it needs to be both but I relate better a female diety) or as people who have completed their cycle of rebirths and have come back to help others who have not completed the cycle. Sorry if I'm rambling or making no sense. I haven't quite wrapped my head around the full idea yet. I'm just interested in what other people who consider themselfs pagans think.

~Blessed Be~
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7 years ago  ::  Nov 19, 2007 - 1:48AM #2
EmeraldGuardian
Posts: 47
An interesting thought...As far as "pagan" which I see as the ancient faith of England, isn't there the Goddess? I'm not all familiar with its theology so please inform me if there's a lack of info there. =P

But that depends what kind of pagan you see yourself as. Not to mention personal beliefs.
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7 years ago  ::  Dec 18, 2007 - 5:25PM #3
arianna_avalon
Posts: 2
I think that together, God and Goddess make one Spirit. Each complements the other. I also think that all female deities are manifestations of one Goddess and all male deities are manifestations of one God. I'm reading the Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley right now and I think her character, Vivienne, the Lady of Avalon, puts it nicely by saying, "All Gods are one God and all Goddesses are one Goddess. The god worshipped by the Christians is the same god that we of the Old Religion honour." Personally, I can identify more with the Goddess than the God. I guess it's because she is left out of so many other religions and as a young woman searching for her identity, I can connect more with her than a male deity.

~*~ Goddess Bless
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7 years ago  ::  Jan 17, 2008 - 8:40PM #4
StarLight
Posts: 21
Arianna_Avalon,
I like the way you put it. All goddesses are one goddess and all gods are one gods. I too lean toward a feminine deity being female myself. I also love Marion Zimmer Bradely. I have read most of the Darkover series. They are absolutely amazing. You might try reading Sara Douglass or Melanie Rawn. I love how Sara Douglass represents the god and goddess in her books.
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2008 - 10:24PM #5
Diarmuid
Posts: 291
In Wicca (not so much Paganism in general) the idea of all gods and goddesses being archetypes of one Goddess and one God is very influenced by Jungian idealogy. Some go even further to say that even the God and Goddess are a part of a One. And then there are those who believe that all deities are just archetypes within the mind that represent a part of oneself. Then there is pantheism, which is the belief that they Deity is just the living force within all.
As for me, I am a "hard" polytheist. I believe that all the Gods are individuals with seperate personalities and desires and are as independent and diverse as humanity is. I believe that the only thing that can be seen as the "One" is the community in which the Gods, humans, spirits and nature come together to create. Though this community is chaos and unbalanced, therefore not really a One at all.
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2008 - 10:33PM #6
Diarmuid
Posts: 291
[QUOTE=EmeraldGuardian;79682]An interesting thought...As far as "pagan" which I see as the ancient faith of England, isn't there the Goddess? I'm not all familiar with its theology so please inform me if there's a lack of info there. =P

But that depends what kind of pagan you see yourself as. Not to mention personal beliefs.[/QUOTE]

There was no single ancient faith in England. Though the Celtic beliefs within it were similar, each tribe and area would have its own gods and goddesses as well as the shared gods of the wider area. There was no "Goddess", there were the Gods and Goddesses. In all likelyhood, the pagans of ancient Britain were "hard polytheists", very different from Neo-Pagan religions like Wicca.
As for the word "pagan" it was a derogatory derived from the Latin word paganus meaning "country folk", so the religion of peasants. It has been embraced today be a very large and diverse community to describe their beliefs. So pagan is an umberella term encompassing a vast number of religions and belief systems. In the Christian use of the word (not ALL Christians, I am generalizing, I know), but in the wider Christian use of the word, it is used to describe any religion other than the Abrahamic faiths (Christianity, Judaism, Islam).
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2008 - 10:24PM #7
Diarmuid
Posts: 291
In Wicca (not so much Paganism in general) the idea of all gods and goddesses being archetypes of one Goddess and one God is very influenced by Jungian idealogy. Some go even further to say that even the God and Goddess are a part of a One. And then there are those who believe that all deities are just archetypes within the mind that represent a part of oneself. Then there is pantheism, which is the belief that they Deity is just the living force within all.
As for me, I am a "hard" polytheist. I believe that all the Gods are individuals with seperate personalities and desires and are as independent and diverse as humanity is. I believe that the only thing that can be seen as the "One" is the community in which the Gods, humans, spirits and nature come together to create. Though this community is chaos and unbalanced, therefore not really a One at all.
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 05, 2008 - 10:33PM #8
Diarmuid
Posts: 291
[QUOTE=EmeraldGuardian;79682]An interesting thought...As far as "pagan" which I see as the ancient faith of England, isn't there the Goddess? I'm not all familiar with its theology so please inform me if there's a lack of info there. =P

But that depends what kind of pagan you see yourself as. Not to mention personal beliefs.[/QUOTE]

There was no single ancient faith in England. Though the Celtic beliefs within it were similar, each tribe and area would have its own gods and goddesses as well as the shared gods of the wider area. There was no "Goddess", there were the Gods and Goddesses. In all likelyhood, the pagans of ancient Britain were "hard polytheists", very different from Neo-Pagan religions like Wicca.
As for the word "pagan" it was a derogatory derived from the Latin word paganus meaning "country folk", so the religion of peasants. It has been embraced today be a very large and diverse community to describe their beliefs. So pagan is an umberella term encompassing a vast number of religions and belief systems. In the Christian use of the word (not ALL Christians, I am generalizing, I know), but in the wider Christian use of the word, it is used to describe any religion other than the Abrahamic faiths (Christianity, Judaism, Islam).
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 21, 2008 - 9:58PM #9
cactus_flower17
Posts: 5
I completely agree. I think there should be a duality in divinity, and yet I do connect more with the female part of it. heh....probably because I AM female....lol
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7 years ago  ::  Apr 22, 2008 - 1:35PM #10
MrContemplative
Posts: 34
hmmm, very interesting questions and ideas.......
as these seem to be, and strike at, the very core of our faith, i feel it is good that we are talking about something that seems to be very awkward for many other teens.

but to continue the subject:
i, personally, think it's kinda like it is in the Forgotten Realms fantasy world: "You can worship one god of a pantheon, one god of no pantheons, or a whole pantheon of deities. But if you don't worship any deities, your life will end in pure eternity, neither good, nor bad. If you falsely pray to a deity/deities, then may they protect you, because you will most definitely need it."*

*I paraphrased this from the campaign handbook.
Note: I am not some phony who bases my ideas off of DnD, but i think that some of the quotes in the books really sum things up well.
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