Post Reply
Page 2 of 2  •  Prev 1 2
Switch to Forum Live View 160,000 Couples Become Married Overnight
1 year ago  ::  Mar 20, 2013 - 5:03PM #11
Shusha
Posts: 4,345

Mar 20, 2013 -- 11:47AM, d_p_m wrote:

Mar 18, 2013 -- 11:26PM, Shusha wrote:


Mar 18, 2013 -- 10:53PM, d_p_m wrote:


Mar 18, 2013 -- 8:33PM, Shusha wrote:


The weird thing is to think about being legally "married" to more than one person:  the ex who you are not quite legally divorced from yet and the common law spouse you have been living with and are also legally married to. 




For that matter, what happens if you are living with more than one other person?




THAT is a most interesting question.  I have no idea.





I doubt anyone has thought about it. It's relatively easy to avoid bigamy when you have to have a ceremony and a marriage certificate to get married... but there are a number of people in poly relationships... and as well, how do you distinguish between people just living together, and people 'living together', especially now when it doesn't matter what sex the people are... especially with 'after the fact' claims? Do how many marriages do four people living in the same household create? Two? Three? Four? Six? How many are guilty of bigamy? Trigamy? If one person leaves, can they claim support and property from each of the other three?



I haven't looked into it.  I do know that ALL persons who provide financial care for children for any length of time become legally liable to continue to do so in the future.  Thus a child could potentially have a bio dad, bio mom and two or three or more step parents, grandparents or other guardians contributing child support to whoever the child happens to be living with. 


But as for spousal support for more than two people?  I'd imagine it was possible. If someone lived with two others and that person stayed home and looked after the household for many years while the other two worked, I'd imagine there would be a case for both having to support that person for a time after a break up. 


Normally, the BC government doesn't overly concern itself with people's living arrangements.  Its only the split of property, spousal support and child support which could come up in court. 

Quick Reply
Cancel
1 year ago  ::  Mar 20, 2013 - 5:08PM #12
d_p_m
Posts: 9,612

Mar 20, 2013 -- 5:03PM, Shusha wrote:

Mar 20, 2013 -- 11:47AM, d_p_m wrote:

Mar 18, 2013 -- 11:26PM, Shusha wrote:


Mar 18, 2013 -- 10:53PM, d_p_m wrote:


Mar 18, 2013 -- 8:33PM, Shusha wrote:


The weird thing is to think about being legally "married" to more than one person:  the ex who you are not quite legally divorced from yet and the common law spouse you have been living with and are also legally married to. 




For that matter, what happens if you are living with more than one other person?




THAT is a most interesting question.  I have no idea.





I doubt anyone has thought about it. It's relatively easy to avoid bigamy when you have to have a ceremony and a marriage certificate to get married... but there are a number of people in poly relationships... and as well, how do you distinguish between people just living together, and people 'living together', especially now when it doesn't matter what sex the people are... especially with 'after the fact' claims? Do how many marriages do four people living in the same household create? Two? Three? Four? Six? How many are guilty of bigamy? Trigamy? If one person leaves, can they claim support and property from each of the other three?



I haven't looked into it.  I do know that ALL persons who provide financial care for children for any length of time become legally liable to continue to do so in the future.  Thus a child could potentially have a bio dad, bio mom and two or three or more step parents, grandparents or other guardians contributing child support to whoever the child happens to be living with. 


But as for spousal support for more than two people?  I'd imagine it was possible. If someone lived with two others and that person stayed home and looked after the household for many years while the other two worked, I'd imagine there would be a case for both having to support that person for a time after a break up. 


Normally, the BC government doesn't overly concern itself with people's living arrangements.  Its only the split of property, spousal support and child support which could come up in court. 





I find it ironic that according to one account, a major motivation for this change was to lighten the case load in BC courts...

"If you aren't confused by quantum physics, you haven't really understood it."

― Niels Bohr



"One need only watch a few minutes of any Orphan Black episode to see why Tatiana Maslany deserves to win every acting award available."

    —Mark Rozeman, http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2014/07/18-first-time-emmy-nominees-wed-like-to-see.html?a=1
Quick Reply
Cancel
1 year ago  ::  Mar 20, 2013 - 5:14PM #13
d_p_m
Posts: 9,612

Mar 20, 2013 -- 5:03PM, Shusha wrote:


I do know that ALL persons who provide financial care for children for any length of time become legally liable to continue to do so in the future.  Thus a child could potentially have a bio dad, bio mom and two or three or more step parents, grandparents or other guardians contributing child support to whoever the child happens to be living with.



This never struck me as fair, that if you have a relationship with a woman for a few years, or potentially, a few months, you are on the hook for supporting her children forever.

Rule #!, never move in with a woman and her children.

"If you aren't confused by quantum physics, you haven't really understood it."

― Niels Bohr



"One need only watch a few minutes of any Orphan Black episode to see why Tatiana Maslany deserves to win every acting award available."

    —Mark Rozeman, http://www.pastemagazine.com/blogs/lists/2014/07/18-first-time-emmy-nominees-wed-like-to-see.html?a=1
Quick Reply
Cancel
1 year ago  ::  Apr 12, 2013 - 3:36PM #14
Beliefnet_community
Posts: 484

This thread was moved from World News & Politics.  I'm hoping it will generate some interest on this forum Wink

We are listening! Problems, complaints, other issues? Send us a message at Beliefnet_community.
Quick Reply
Cancel
1 year ago  ::  Apr 13, 2013 - 2:20AM #15
Anesis
Posts: 1,542

Mar 20, 2013 -- 5:14PM, d_p_m wrote:


Mar 20, 2013 -- 5:03PM, Shusha wrote:


I do know that ALL persons who provide financial care for children for any length of time become legally liable to continue to do so in the future.  Thus a child could potentially have a bio dad, bio mom and two or three or more step parents, grandparents or other guardians contributing child support to whoever the child happens to be living with.



This never struck me as fair, that if you have a relationship with a woman for a few years, or potentially, a few months, you are on the hook for supporting her children forever.

Rule #!, never move in with a woman and her children.





This was my thought, too. Men will be scared to death to live with any woman, which may lead to a lot of couples maintaining separate homes. BC is so big on going green, that this law will likely have a significant impact on housing cost, gas, hydro, etc.


Another change in the FLA has to do with child welfare. It appears (I have not read it in detail, but this is word of mouth from colleagues) that with every divorce, the government has taken it on themselves to decide what is in the child's best interest. It appears it is not up to the parents anymore. My understanding is that the ministry (child protection) now is obligated to assess all parents who are getting divorced, so THEY can decide how to handle custody and guardianship. Oh....and custody and guardianship are now one and the same. There is no such thing anymore as joint guardianship but sole custody.


The brainiac BC government obviously did not consult with child welfare social workers, lawyers, courts, or mediators before bringing in this Act. Terribly disappointing.

Quick Reply
Cancel
Page 2 of 2  •  Prev 1 2
 
    Viewing this thread :: 0 registered and 1 guest
    No registered users viewing
    Advertisement

    Beliefnet On Facebook